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Another Bright Idea - Pay Obese People To Lose Weight

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It sounds daft but anything that gets away from the idea of a health service as a mere conduit for the wares of big pharma is a good thing.

Vast amounts are spent of drugs treatments and invasive bypass surgeries that throw up their own side effects and issues.

Just paying fatties to be healthier, if it is found to work, could save a packet.

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Let them stay fat and die early. It's a lifestyle choice. And I read recently (apologies, can't find the research - you can treat me like a ranting idiot) that overall fat people cost the state less, as even though they cost more than a healthy person for each year they are alive, the total cost is less as the healthy person will cost more over their entire (much longer) life. I don't know if the research took into account the cost to industry in missed work etc.

So, I would like a state pension, and if all the fatties die early, there is a slim chance I might get one.

Edited for stupidity.

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Let them stay fat and die early. It's a lifestyle choice. And I read recently (apologies, can't find the research - you can treat me like a ranting idiot) that overall fat people cost the state less, as even though they cost more than a healthy person for each year they are alive, the total cost is less as the healthy person will cost more over their entire (much longer) life. I don't know if the research took into account the cost to industry in missed work etc.

So, I would like a state pension, and if all the fatties die early, there is a slim chance I might get one.

Edited for stupidity.

Good point. How many hugely obese 90 year olds are there around ?

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More idiotic social engineering.

'Thou shalt be healthy!'

Soon, no doubt, smokers, drinkers, dangerous drivers, parachutists, people who don't wash, nose pickers etc will benefit from such largesse.

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Let them stay fat and die early. It's a lifestyle choice. And I read recently (apologies, can't find the research - you can treat me like a ranting idiot) that overall fat people cost the state less, as even though they cost more than a healthy person for each year they are alive, the total cost is less as the healthy person will cost more over their entire (much longer) life. I don't know if the research took into account the cost to industry in missed work etc.

So, I would like a state pension, and if all the fatties die early, there is a slim chance I might get one.

Edited for stupidity.

The trouble is people don't usually die early these days, however marred by sickness their lives may be. The mass medicalisation of society, all the breakthroughs, have masked the fact that people are more unhealthy now, with degenerative diseases more prevalent than ever. However, the medical system can keep you ticking over in a state of ill health for decades.

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More idiotic social engineering.

'Thou shalt be healthy!'

Soon, no doubt, smokers, drinkers, dangerous drivers, parachutists, people who don't wash, nose pickers etc will benefit from such largesse.

You forgot.... mountain bikers, canoeists, gym attendees, soldiers, sailors, tinkers, tailors, rich men, beggar men and thieves....

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

You forgot.... mountain bikers, canoeists, gym attendees, soldiers, sailors, tinkers, tailors, rich men, beggar men and thieves....

Death by enjoyment is prohibited.

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You forgot.... mountain bikers, canoeists, gym attendees, soldiers, sailors, tinkers, tailors, rich men, beggar men and thieves....

In my experience, cyclists cost us a great deal of NHS money - they're forever falling off their bikes at speed and breaking, lacerating and concussing their bodies. That calls for some expensive [titanium] hardware in mending the broken bones and lots of medical training for those who treat them - not cheap.

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In my experience, cyclists cost us a great deal of NHS money - they're forever falling off their bikes at speed and breaking, lacerating and concussing their bodies. That calls for some expensive [titanium] hardware in mending the broken bones and lots of medical training for those who treat them - not cheap.

I must say I agree. While I don't doubt that over weight people on the whole have a poor health record I can only go on personal experience and it is this.

Me - Over weight, possibly but strict standards obese. I'm out every weekend in the woods climbing up hills and generally fit and healthy. The last time I went to the doctors was last year about nose bleeds which was a single visit with no prescription. Prior to that it was 4 or 5 years ago, again nothing significant.

Friend 1 - Football fanatic, had about 5 serious injuries in the last 8 years, most significant was late last year when he destroyed his knee cap and now cannot play football for 12 months and has pins in his knee. Was in hospital for a week and is now having regular treatment on his knee.

Friend 2 - Goes to the gym and runs 10K's all the time. Also has a knackered knee and again had significant work done on it in the last 2-3 years.

Friend 3 - Rugby player, been in hospital a number of times with various injuries, broken arms, dislocated shoulder etc.

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I must say I agree. While I don't doubt that over weight people on the whole have a poor health record I can only go on personal experience and it is this.

Me - Over weight, possibly but strict standards obese. I'm out every weekend in the woods climbing up hills and generally fit and healthy. The last time I went to the doctors was last year about nose bleeds which was a single visit with no prescription. Prior to that it was 4 or 5 years ago, again nothing significant.

Friend 1 - Football fanatic, had about 5 serious injuries in the last 8 years, most significant was late last year when he destroyed his knee cap and now cannot play football for 12 months and has pins in his knee. Was in hospital for a week and is now having regular treatment on his knee.

Friend 2 - Goes to the gym and runs 10K's all the time. Also has a knackered knee and again had significant work done on it in the last 2-3 years.

Friend 3 - Rugby player, been in hospital a number of times with various injuries, broken arms, dislocated shoulder etc.

Absolutely shocking, these people cannot be allowed to go making themselves unhealthy.

Pay them to stop.

At once!

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Let them stay fat and die early. It's a lifestyle choice. And I read recently (apologies, can't find the research - you can treat me like a ranting idiot) that overall fat people cost the state less, as even though they cost more than a healthy person for each year they are alive, the total cost is less as the healthy person will cost more over their entire (much longer) life. I don't know if the research took into account the cost to industry in missed work etc.

So, I would like a state pension, and if all the fatties die early, there is a slim chance I might get one.

Edited for stupidity.

I'd understood from health professionals that, for most people, the bulk of cost the NHS occurs at the beginning and end of people's lives. Birth and death are expensive, particularly if you spend some years of ill-health prior to your actual death. (for example due to being unhealthy due to excess weight) Extra years of good health not bothering the NHS don't add cost.

OTOH living longer costs more in pension. So logical conclusion is not simply to let fatties die but to kill off all elderly and save pensions. In other words kill you off to save paying you state pension :)

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Guest theboltonfury

I must say I agree. While I don't doubt that over weight people on the whole have a poor health record I can only go on personal experience and it is this.

Me - Over weight, possibly but strict standards obese. I'm out every weekend in the woods climbing up hills and generally fit and healthy. The last time I went to the doctors was last year about nose bleeds which was a single visit with no prescription. Prior to that it was 4 or 5 years ago, again nothing significant.

Friend 1 - Football fanatic, had about 5 serious injuries in the last 8 years, most significant was late last year when he destroyed his knee cap and now cannot play football for 12 months and has pins in his knee. Was in hospital for a week and is now having regular treatment on his knee.

Friend 2 - Goes to the gym and runs 10K's all the time. Also has a knackered knee and again had significant work done on it in the last 2-3 years.

Friend 3 - Rugby player, been in hospital a number of times with various injuries, broken arms, dislocated shoulder etc.

There you have it. It's best to be a fatty.

Dust?

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There you have it. It's best to be a fatty.

I had to rush off in to a meeting so didn't get a chance to add my closing statement.

Of course being a good average weight and fit and healthy is clearly best, my point is that the argument about fat people being a burden on the NHS is skewed at best.

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Guest theboltonfury

I had to rush off in to a meeting so didn't get a chance to add my closing statement.

Of course being a good average weight and fit and healthy is clearly best, my point is that the argument about fat people being a burden on the NHS is skewed at best.

Quite right. The argument that many don't reach 80% of life expectancy must back this up. As someone else said, it saves on pensions too.

Harsh but true I guess.

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Quite right. The argument that many don't reach 80% of life expectancy must back this up. As someone else said, it saves on pensions too.

Harsh but true I guess.

Plus think of all the extra money they spend on food as well. Keeps the economy going. I bet Tesco loves fatties.

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Friend 2 - Goes to the gym and runs 10K's all the time. Also has a knackered knee and again had significant work done on it in the last 2-3 years.

I think a bit of context is needed here to be honest

Friend 2 - Has a knackered knee from when he was a borderline alcoholic and fell down stairs in a nightclub , man i enjoyed those days :lol:

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I'd understood from health professionals that, for most people, the bulk of cost the NHS occurs at the beginning and end of people's lives. Birth and death are expensive, particularly if you spend some years of ill-health prior to your actual death. (for example due to being unhealthy due to excess weight) Extra years of good health not bothering the NHS don't add cost.

OTOH living longer costs more in pension. So logical conclusion is not simply to let fatties die but to kill off all elderly and save pensions. In other words kill you off to save paying you state pension :)

... and if we were all killed at birth, there'd be no problem.

Or, more Malthusian-ly, only let the brighter ones breed and they'll contribute to, more than they take from, society. Discuss.

[retires hastily, having removed pin from grenade:ph34r:]

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Plus think of all the extra money they spend on food as well. Keeps the economy going. I bet Tesco loves fatties.

Sshh! They'll be making food VAT-able if they read this.:ph34r:

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  • 146 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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