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repetitive bleats

High House Prices Affect Everybody

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High house prices negatively affect 'home owners' more than they realise. i'd like to make a list of the ways that everyday life is impacted by our the UK's ridiculous obsession that expensive housing is a good thing. Most of us here realise that the only benificiaries are ultimately those who downsize or bought to speculate - or the banks/solicitors/estate agents that leech from the process.

This list could be cut and pasted in the comments below every article that pushes house price inflation as something to be cheered.

The obvious ones (in my mind) are expensive houses mean:

Everything on the high street becomes more expensive as the rent the shop/restaurant pays is dictated by property prices, and the wages the staff earn need to be enough to allow them to afford to pay their mortgage or rent.

High wages - making the UK much a less competitive place to do business

Two parents need to work full time just to pay the rent. The Daily Mail readers who bemoan all the feral children might want to take note.

I bet there are plenty more. Any takers?

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Activities which are wealth creating and usefull become economically unviable because of an inflated cost of living; this leads to unemployment, poverty and crime

Unemployment poverty and crime lead to high welfare and policing bills which are then paid for by high taxes

High taxes on production lead to unemployment and poverty .. ... ...

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Activities which are wealth creating and usefull become economically unviable because of an inflated cost of living; this leads to unemployment, poverty and crime

Good shout - that also brings to mind the fact that money which could be used to create productive businesses gets diverted into house price speculation.

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Activities which are wealth creating and usefull become economically unviable because of an inflated cost of living; this leads to unemployment, poverty and crime

Unemployment poverty and crime lead to high welfare and policing bills which are then paid for by high taxes

High taxes on production lead to unemployment and poverty .. ... ...

A very good description of the Loop of Doom.

It can be funded by taxes imposed on rising house prices in the short term.

As soon as house prices level out (or, God forbid actually fall) the entire artifice is exposed for the sham that it is.

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Good shout - that also brings to mind the fact that money which could be used to create productive businesses gets diverted into house price speculation.

Absolutely -

And also, because the rewards of the economy are going to real estate holding rather than ingenuity or production, the wrong people (not the productive or the ingenious) have all the power and are making all the decisions about how this wealth should be used to create more wealth.

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High house prices negatively affect 'home owners' more than they realise. i'd like to make a list of the ways that everyday life is impacted by our the UK's ridiculous obsession that expensive housing is a good thing. Most of us here realise that the only benificiaries are ultimately those who downsize or bought to speculate - or the banks/solicitors/estate agents that leech from the process.

This list could be cut and pasted in the comments below every article that pushes house price inflation as something to be cheered.

The obvious ones (in my mind) are expensive houses mean:

Everything on the high street becomes more expensive as the rent the shop/restaurant pays is dictated by property prices, and the wages the staff earn need to be enough to allow them to afford to pay their mortgage or rent.

High wages - making the UK much a less competitive place to do business

Two parents need to work full time just to pay the rent. The Daily Mail readers who bemoan all the feral children might want to take note.

I bet there are plenty more. Any takers?

Bang on

There are many women who want a career, but i have met more in the work place who would much rather be at home with their kids. That is from the top to the bottom , once knew a women who had been the editor of a national newspaper when she retired earlie as they now wanted rid of her she stated more than once , what the f--k have i done with my life , wish i had stayed at home and had had more than one child.

Also if women could leave the work place when they have their children this would free up jobs for the next generation.

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A very good description of the Loop of Doom.

It can be funded by taxes imposed on rising house prices in the short term.

The best way to do it is to tax production and leave real estate ownership relatively tax free so that it remains an attractive investment

Edited by Stars

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- diverts financial and human capital towards house building and other related activities such as estate agents, etc.

- encourage further real estate collateral based lending rather than lending based on productive activities

- hides the extent of the impoverishment of the UK population vis a vis globalisation and enables TPTB to ignore the problem and avoid tackling it

- hides the extent of the population's pension deficit via the 'wealth effect'

- encourages over consumption via same wealth effect, such encouraging impoverishment of individuals and of the country as a whole

- contributes to the 'ponzification' of the economy by encouraging speculation at the expense of thrift, productive activities and investment. Undermines the whole culture of the nation.

- accelerates the process of corruption of public authority employees as they are encouraged to partake in real estate speculation themselves and become interested parties in the ponzi process

- generate artificially high tax revenue that translate in increase entitlements that cannot be supported by the real economy thus leading to unsustainable public deficits once the ponzi bursts

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High house prices negatively affect 'home owners' more than they realise. i'd like to make a list of the ways that everyday life is impacted by our the UK's ridiculous obsession that expensive housing is a good thing. Most of us here realise that the only benificiaries are ultimately those who downsize or bought to speculate - or the banks/solicitors/estate agents that leech from the process.

This list could be cut and pasted in the comments below every article that pushes house price inflation as something to be cheered.

The obvious ones (in my mind) are expensive houses mean:

Everything on the high street becomes more expensive as the rent the shop/restaurant pays is dictated by property prices, and the wages the staff earn need to be enough to allow them to afford to pay their mortgage or rent.

High wages - making the UK much a less competitive place to do business

Two parents need to work full time just to pay the rent. The Daily Mail readers who bemoan all the feral children might want to take note.

I bet there are plenty more. Any takers?

It creates inflation, by endless remortgaging and spending of uncreated, unearnt wealth.

Those that spend the paper wealth which is beyond any relationship to wages, will do so primarily on imported goods thereby creating a balance of payments deficit. This is manifested in govt borrowing ultimately. It transfers unearnt wealth abroad and we end up owing China or wherever huge sums which cannot be repaid. Ringing any bells?

Ordinary people who earn wages like £20-30k cannot ever buy a house unless they inherit money or have parents who will pay for part of it.

Property over collateralised in the small business sector causing yet more risk in the economy when the bubble bursts.

Speculation - a huge land price for parcels with residential planning consent is distorting the market for any other usages. There are hundreds more!

Houses are only bricks and mortar with a few fittings, on a piece of ground. They do not cost a great deal to build. It's land price which is more batty than anything.

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Just thought of another one.

Expensive housing means expensive housing benefits which means higher taxes

Great list of all the reasons why house-price inflation is a bad thing - so why do governments encourage it?

Probably because the bulk of the non-cash money which now accounts for 97% of the UK's money supply has to be created by ordinary people borrowing it into existence from the banks - and mortgages are by far the biggest personal loans. As mortgages (and other debts) are repaid, money disappears from the economy ... unless sufficient numbers of people come forward to replace it, by borrowing some more into existence. The bigger and more numerous the mortgages, the more money flowing into the economy - so governments can congratulate themselves on presiding over a "boom", while increasing their tax take.

In fact, the interests of banks and governments coincide, as they can both expect to profit nicely from property-price inflation.

But it's worth noting that the banks wouldn't have been able to lend enough to push prices up into never-never-land if they didn't have a monopoly privilege on creating all of the nation's new non-cash money.

Enactment of The Bank of England (Creation of Currency) Bill 2010 would make it impossible to inflate house prices in this particular way ever again, since it establishes the basic principle that " ... every credit to an account must be matched by an equal debit from another account". Only the Bank of England would be exempt from this requirement, giving it sole right to create all non-cash money in the UK (as it already enjoys the sole right to create money in the traditional form of notes and coins). The commercial banks, restricted to lending money which already existed in deposits, would no longer be in a position to drive up prices by agreeing to finance absurdly over-valued property deals.

The Bank of England (Creation of Currency) Bill 2010 is online at http://www.bankofenglandact.co.uk/.

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Just thought of another one.

Expensive housing means expensive housing benefits which means higher taxes

:rolleyes::rolleyes: If you had to name the 4/5 props that hold up the entire scam that the "housing market" is :-

ONE: - Is Housing Benefits: Landlords across the land are being MASSIVELY subsidised by the insane levels of OUR taxes which are being doled out as Housing "Benefit" -- it is one of the greatest unstated scandals of our time....

TWO: - LIAR LOANS.......

/Fraudulent Credit/Mortgages of over 3 x salary - in all forms --- i.e. Double income, Interest Only... etc etc.: - The Biggest MAMMOTH in the room EVER in history.....

THE Secret Weapon used by the VI's over the last 15 years to PUMP UP house @prices@ to the LUDICROUS, INSANE, UNAFFORDABLE - and - UNSUSTAINABLE levels of today.....

:rolleyes:

Edited by eric pebble

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Bang on

There are many women who want a career, but i have met more in the work place who would much rather be at home with their kids. That is from the top to the bottom , once knew a women who had been the editor of a national newspaper when she retired earlie as they now wanted rid of her she stated more than once , what the f--k have i done with my life , wish i had stayed at home and had had more than one child.

Also if women could leave the work place when they have their children this would free up jobs for the next generation.

Women should be tied to the sink......... :D:P

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Guest The Relaxation Suite

High house prices negatively affect 'home owners' more than they realise. i'd like to make a list of the ways that everyday life is impacted by our the UK's ridiculous obsession that expensive housing is a good thing. Most of us here realise that the only benificiaries are ultimately those who downsize or bought to speculate - or the banks/solicitors/estate agents that leech from the process.

This list could be cut and pasted in the comments below every article that pushes house price inflation as something to be cheered.

The obvious ones (in my mind) are expensive houses mean:

Everything on the high street becomes more expensive as the rent the shop/restaurant pays is dictated by property prices, and the wages the staff earn need to be enough to allow them to afford to pay their mortgage or rent.

High wages - making the UK much a less competitive place to do business

Two parents need to work full time just to pay the rent. The Daily Mail readers who bemoan all the feral children might want to take note.

I bet there are plenty more. Any takers?

Unaffordable house prices are reponsible for nearly every single social problem, with some exceptions of course.

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Women should be tied to the sink......... :D:P

No they should have choices , but so many with young children do not have the choice to stay at home they have to work.

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Deciding whether or not one can afford children should be another choice; but the benefits system has removed it for those with little responsibility <_<

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Deciding whether or not one can afford children should be another choice; but the benefits system has removed it for those with little responsibility <_<

Paid for by those with responsibility.

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No they should have choices , but so many with young children do not have the choice to stay at home they have to work.

It is very sad, for a famiy to afford a home now both partners 'have' to work this is all to the detriment to the child as both parents work full time and the children are harvested off to numerous nurseries and I am sure come off the worse for this.

Property speculation and 'investment' are the main reasons for this and should have been curtailed many years ago.

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It is very sad, for a famiy to afford a home now both partners 'have' to work this is all to the detriment to the child as both parents work full time and the children are harvested off to numerous nurseries and I am sure come off the worse for this.

Property speculation and 'investment' are the main reasons for this and should have been curtailed many years ago.

Understatement of the century.... :rolleyes:

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It is very sad, for a famiy to afford a home now both partners 'have' to work this is all to the detriment to the child as both parents work full time and the children are harvested off to numerous nurseries and I am sure come off the worse for this.

Property speculation and 'investment' are the main reasons for this and should have been curtailed many years ago.

Get women back in the kitchen and looking after their kids!

Take away their extra earning power and make them rely on dad's wage only, like in the good old days.

I can see such restrictions being somewhat unpopular with many women.

Unless you actualy stop people having both partners earning, then how do you stop those 2-income couples being able to outbid the "traditional" wife-at-home 1-income families for any given house?

They will always have more money to spend, especially if both partners have good jobs.

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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