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Check out weekly housing benefit guidelines for your area (note rooms = bedrooms + living rooms).

A rent officer has told me that the figures in his area are gathered from letting agents - may not be universally true.

Be interesting if anyone can spot a trend.

http://www.voa.gov.uk/publications/localrefrents/index.htmThe LRR determination is provided for all HB claims.

The LRR is the mid-point between what in the rent officer’s opinion are the highest (‘H’) and lowest (‘L’) non-exceptional rents in a given locality.

There is a full definition of locality in the regulations. In summary, the locality is an area of at least two neighbourhoods within which the tenant might reasonably expected to live, having regard to the accessibility of various facilities and services, and containing a mix of residential premises and variety of different tenancies.

Rent officers use a framework of generally agreed localities. In the interests of fair and consistent decision-making, rent officers also meet regularly to discuss and agree the H and L points in the range for LRRs in each of generally-agreed locality. These discussions generate the agreed LRR levels shown in the table.

Rent officers are required to make an LRR determination for properties based on the number of “rooms suitable for living in” (i.e living rooms and bedrooms, not bathrooms and kitchens)

The table show LRRs for properties for 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 rooms. They also show the three LRR categories for one room properties, which rent officers call 1A, 1B and 1C. The tables provide an indication of rent officer decision-making during the previous quarter of the year.

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Wahoo! £500 a month.

The rent including bill on my self contained granny annex is £330.

Kickback!

it's no bl**dy wonder this has pushed private rents up, folow this logic:

1) find lower and higher limits of local rents

2) set social rent at average of these 2

3) landlords set their lowest rent now at the average rent set in 2

4) therefore lower limit of local rents increases

5) repeat from step 1

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it's no bl**dy wonder this has pushed private rents up, folow this logic:

1) find lower and higher limits of local rents

2) set social rent at average of these 2

3) landlords set their lowest rent now at the average rent set in 2

4) therefore lower limit of local rents increases

5) repeat from step 1

I’d like know how long this unchecked institutional housing inflation has gone on for.

The effect in some London boroughs has been to force 40% of homes to be supported by local housing allowance. I have seen what that does morally to people, they know the only way to live is to live is to lie. Yet another example of Nulabours fairness. :angry:

Could someone let me know how it is that they can’t be held to account for their actions?

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it's no bl**dy wonder this has pushed private rents up, folow this logic:

1) find lower and higher limits of local rents

2) set social rent at average of these 2

3) landlords set their lowest rent now at the average rent set in 2

4) therefore lower limit of local rents increases

5) repeat from step 1

I thought HB was set at 90% of the average

tim

Edited by tim123

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I thought HB was set at 90% of the average

tim

maybe - a similar principle would apply

change "2" to: 2) set social rent at 90% of the average of these 2

it would still inflate rents

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I'd like know how long this unchecked institutional housing inflation has gone on for.

The effect in some London boroughs has been to force 40% of homes to be supported by local housing allowance. I have seen what that does morally to people, they know the only way to live is to live is to lie. Yet another example of Nulabours fairness. mad.gif

Could someone let me know how it is that they can't be held to account for their actions?

they are. we have democratic elections

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it's no bl**dy wonder this has pushed private rents up, folow this logic:

1) find lower and higher limits of local rents

2) set social rent at average of these 2

3) landlords set their lowest rent now at the average rent set in 2

4) therefore lower limit of local rents increases

5) repeat from step 1

I should point out I'm not on any benefits whatsoever.

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Thanks for finding excellent resource. I have attempted to obtain this information in the past and run into a brick wall.

Compare to average council rents and join the dots. This is so easily fixed. No need to clamp down on benefits to save the

taxpayer billions. Could even fund the building with QE, at least there would be valuable and money-saving assets to show for it.

Oh, and real jobs.

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Thanks for finding excellent resource. I have attempted to obtain this information in the past and run into a brick wall.

Compare to average council rents and join the dots. This is so easily fixed. No need to clamp down on benefits to save the

taxpayer billions. Could even fund the building with QE, at least there would be valuable and money-saving assets to show for it.

Oh, and real jobs.

Yep. Instead we get permanent banker bailout.

I'm hoping some of the IT guys on here can crunch the numbers. Nobody else will.

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Unfortunately it's set to the median level.

So that's not unfortunate then.

If everybody below the median put their rent up to the median to take advantage of HB, then the median amount would not change.

tim

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Unfortunately it's set to the median level.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_Housing_Allowance

A number chosen through pure spite to ensure that no matter how hard the private sector renters work around half of them will always have worse accommodation than the scroungers.

Not necessarily true, as some LL with good accomodation will - perhaps having had a bad non-paid rent experience - not let to HB tenants even if they could get a slightly higher rent from them. The recent trend back to giving the tenant the money rather than direct to LL may exacerbate that effect. Not that I think HB is a good or fair system. A work colleague of mine has a recently inherited house in E London that she decided to refurbish and rent out rather than sell. At the rent the letting agent told them to advertise, the ONLY takers they got were HB prospective tenants who must have known they had the whip hand as the single mother with child she 'chose' as tenant proceeded to demand new lounge furniture as a sweetener, even telling her the colour she wanted the sofa to be and the which shop stocked it.

My colleague went along with it and bought the furniture - perhaps reasoning she needed new furniture anyway... but the point I would take from it was that at the high rent she was asking the only takers were the HB tenants, and they knew they were in a strong position to pick and choose. This suggests that in this area at least HB is putting a floor under unreasonably high rents.

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Not necessarily true, as some LL with good accomodation will - perhaps having had a bad non-paid rent experience - not let to HB tenants even if they could get a slightly higher rent from them. The recent trend back to giving the tenant the money rather than direct to LL may exacerbate that effect.

One other factor is that the LL can get paid direct from the LA if the HB tenant defaults for a couple of months - I don't know if this includes arrears.

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Not necessarily true, as some LL with good accomodation will - perhaps having had a bad non-paid rent experience - not let to HB tenants even if they could get a slightly higher rent from them. The recent trend back to giving the tenant the money rather than direct to LL may exacerbate that effect. Not that I think HB is a good or fair system. A work colleague of mine has a recently inherited house in E London that she decided to refurbish and rent out rather than sell. At the rent the letting agent told them to advertise, the ONLY takers they got were HB prospective tenants who must have known they had the whip hand as the single mother with child she 'chose' as tenant proceeded to demand new lounge furniture as a sweetener, even telling her the colour she wanted the sofa to be and the which shop stocked it.

My colleague went along with it and bought the furniture - perhaps reasoning she needed new furniture anyway... but the point I would take from it was that at the high rent she was asking the only takers were the HB tenants, and they knew they were in a strong position to pick and choose. This suggests that in this area at least HB is putting a floor under unreasonably high rents.

I find this odd.

For all of the places that I have looked, the HB allowance is well below a "normal" rent for the area.

tim

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I find this odd.

For all of the places that I have looked, the HB allowance is well below a "normal" rent for the area.

tim

What do you mean by normal? Comparing like with like?

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Does anyone know how to get time series data for the average weekly housing benefit paid to private tenants?

I'd just be interested to see how it's varied over time.

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So asking vested interests (how many letting agents have property?) what rents should be for lha is insane. That surely needs to stop.

They should include council rents in their calculations - otherwise it's squewed solely at increasing rents.

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Check out weekly housing benefit guidelines for your area (note rooms = bedrooms + living rooms).

A rent officer has told me that the figures in his area are gathered from letting agents - may not be universally true.

Be interesting if anyone can spot a trend.

http://www.voa.gov.uk/publications/localrefrents/index.htmThe LRR determination is provided for all HB claims.

The LRR is the mid-point between what in the rent officer’s opinion are the highest (‘H’) and lowest (‘L’) non-exceptional rents in a given locality.

There is a full definition of locality in the regulations. In summary, the locality is an area of at least two neighbourhoods within which the tenant might reasonably expected to live, having regard to the accessibility of various facilities and services, and containing a mix of residential premises and variety of different tenancies.

Rent officers use a framework of generally agreed localities. In the interests of fair and consistent decision-making, rent officers also meet regularly to discuss and agree the H and L points in the range for LRRs in each of generally-agreed locality. These discussions generate the agreed LRR levels shown in the table.

Rent officers are required to make an LRR determination for properties based on the number of “rooms suitable for living in” (i.e living rooms and bedrooms, not bathrooms and kitchens)

The table show LRRs for properties for 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 rooms. They also show the three LRR categories for one room properties, which rent officers call 1A, 1B and 1C. The tables provide an indication of rent officer decision-making during the previous quarter of the year.

Great data source. Thanks for posting it.

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What do you mean by normal? Comparing like with like?

The 25-75 percentile range.

The original claim was that the rent on the property was so high that only HB claiments could afford it.

For the places that I am looking, 75% of the rents are above the HB limit so an HB claiment can only afford the bottom 25% of properties. All of the high priced properties are rented to people like me who are prepared to pay for "quality" (however you define that).

And to be clear, I am looking at variaous locations in the 20-50 mile range outside of London.

tim

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Thanks for finding excellent resource. I have attempted to obtain this information in the past and run into a brick wall.

Compare to average council rents and join the dots. This is so easily fixed. No need to clamp down on benefits to save the

taxpayer billions. Could even fund the building with QE, at least there would be valuable and money-saving assets to show for it.

Oh, and real jobs.

You don't even have to use government money to fund the building of new council estates.

Look, we don't need the government to manufacture cheap used cars, right? So, just allow the private sector to build good, decent, large, houses, in new, spacious suburbs. Allow the building of a million good new homes, and you will see the prices of all houses in Britain coming down by a great deal.

Yes, only middle class families will live in this new 1 million houses, but they will vacate their current 1 million houses. And it will cost zero to the tax-payers. (Make the developers pay for the developments infrastructures, of course.) And the average quality of UK housing will improve. in the future we can keep doing that, even replacing old estates, and the quality will keep improving.

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Unfortunately it's set to the median level.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_Housing_Allowance

A number chosen through pure spite to ensure that no matter how hard the private sector renters work around half of them will always have worse accommodation than the scroungers.

Exactly!

Please do send an email to your MP, perhaps even forwarded to Eric Pickles, and the housing minister (I forgot his name).

BTW, if someone has a little time, we could try to put together here a list of useful email addresses for this topic (Housing Benefits pushing rents up). Please? (I really can't do it today.) Contacts emails in the press would be very helpful too. The government wants/needs to save money now. The timing is perfect. We must lobby now.

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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