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Gigantic Purple Slug

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Need to get a new pair of trainers for running, outside and on treadmills.

Have had some problems in the past with shin splints, although I'm not that heavy, probably something to do with the way I run.

Any suggestions/recommendations appreciated.

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I run about 30k a week or so, but I have luckily never experienced splints before. Knock on wood.

I usually buy last years models, and rarely spend more than £30-40 a pair.

But I do try them on, looking for low shoe weight, good breathing as in webbing, good weight transfer, and overall construction.

It's probably your technique more than the shoe as far as your splints are concerned, but not everybody is equal.

I had a terrible time when I started until the tibialis anterior muscles toughened up.

TIP: Stay the hell off of treadmill, they are biomechanically incorrect and you see 1.5x ++ pressure at every footfall due to the bouncing.

Try mixed terrain running too, on hard pack earth, trails. Horse paths are good if not too chewed up in the valleys, but watch out for the road apples.

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Need to get a new pair of trainers for running, outside and on treadmills.

Have had some problems in the past with shin splints, although I'm not that heavy, probably something to do with the way I run.

Any suggestions/recommendations appreciated.

Stop running at 60mph Steve.

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Need to get a new pair of trainers for running, outside and on treadmills.

Even The Bionic Man needs decent footwear wink.gif

I am training for a marathon (first timer), and am running, well jogging, over 30 miles a week.

The following might not be the answer you want, but it will save your knees, motivation, shins & wallet in the long run (no pun intended):

  • bite the bullet & go to a proper running shop (Runners Need, London Marathon Store if you are in the capital), and get your running gait analyzed. They will recommend the correct shoe for your type of foot fall. Get this wrong, and the aches / injuries will follow (runners knee, achilles tendonitis, shin splints, hip problems)
  • They will have a few different types according to your budget, If you are overweight / on the heavy side, get a pair with cushioning
  • Once you know your foot type (pronator, mild over pronator (like me) etc), you can do like the other poster recommended & buy 'last years style' for about 40% less at sportshoes.com. But buy from the shop the first time, as if they analyse your gait & don't buy it is a bit of a p155 take.
  • Gait analysis involves them videoing your feet as you run on the treadmill. It's quite informative actually
  • In my experience, I found I was a mild over-pronator, so was recommended Saucony Grid Hurricane's, or Asics Gel Kayano's. Both are 'proper' running shoes at about £100 / pair. But now I buy them online for about £65.
  • I tried to go cheap by buying a pair of New Balanace 468's (again for mild over pronators) for £55 new - they gave me a burstitis in my ankle joint, so you get what you pay for. My advice (& that of others I know) is to get a pair you like & stick with the same shoe / brand
  • Brands to check are Saucony (lovely brand, feel like slippers, quite wide), Asics (ditto, but a bit firmer), Mizuno (her indoors loves hers). Avoid New Balance, Nike & Adidas.

I've been jogging for about 2 years now, and have been bitten by the bug big style & get ar5ey if I don't get out on the road, and have lost over two stone in the process - so happy to advise further...

g

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Steve - I went down the whole 'Get a proper set of running shoes' plan for years and years. Still kept on getting wee niggly injuries. Found a lot of info on different styles of running. Pose technique, forefoot running etc.. Basically trying to run as you would if you were barefoot. As this is how we are supposed to run. The logic makes sense.

I am an overpronator - and so got the big chunky heeled running shoes/orthotics and all.

However there is a lot of thought that these alter your running style as we shouldn't really be landing hard on our heels - if you run barefoot on grass you will find you naturally run with your forefoot. If you don't land hard on your heels then over-pronating is not such a problem - as you are not slamming your heels down hard - and this is where the pronation begins.

Of course we are not supposed to run on really hard surfaces either so just running barefoot along the road is not much of an option. So got myself a pair of the Vibram 5 finger things to move onto eventually - after very slowly trying to build up on some low profile running shoes with much smaller heels than I used to have - trying to ease the forefoot running in very gently. I reckon if you go at it hard you will end up in trouble.

No idea if it will work - but I have heard good things about it, and I think the logic makes sense. Taking it very slowly though. Achilles/calfs/foot muscles will really need to get up to speed with the extra work required for running forefoot.

One thing I have noticed about runners you see pounding the pavements - their technique is usually horrific. So inefficient and painful looking. Amazing as with any other sport/pastime people will have lessons, look for advice, do practice techniques. However when it comes to running people just assume they know how to do it. Show them a quick vid of themselves and they will soon realise the truth !!

I do have to say the few runners I see who look like they are efficient - do look like they are leaning forward and almost 'falling forward' as they run. Good enough for me to give it a try. A few 100m at a time though.

Sorry for confusing things Steve. :D

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I too once badly suffered from shin splints Steve from too heavy / ill-cushioned shoes and had to stop. Since then I have been happy to pay whatever because an extra £20 is a small price to pay to avoid shin splints.

I like Asics gel as I tend to crush other shoes to death but Brooks Beast is also excellent, they are my current pair and probably the one I will buy again next time. About £60 / £70.

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Better still, don't run but cycle, more efficient, body weight is supported, low impact and much better on the joints :rolleyes: Seriously we were not designed to run long distances. Sprinting is OK. Put as much effort into cycling and you will go four times faster (and further). I used to run/jog round my local park, and quite frankly the following day felt as though I had been in a car crash.

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Better still, don't run but cycle, more efficient, body weight is supported, low impact and much better on the joints :rolleyes: Seriously we were not designed to run long distances. Sprinting is OK. Put as much effort into cycling and you will go four times faster (and further). I used to run/jog round my local park, and quite frankly the following day felt as though I had been in a car crash.

Yes, and runnng is boring. ;) Sprinting is the best way to lose weight, do 20 x 100m sprint separated by about a minute. Burns more calories than plodding 5km away.

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What Gary Bug said; this is about getting to the right shop, not brand names or particular models.

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Please don't believe that repeated sprinting will leave your legs in any better shape/less likely to be injured. You have to build up very very very slowly to this. Running too fast too soon is one of the main reasons for injuries in runners.

It is great for your fitness though.

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Thanks for all the great advice.

Went to the city centre to something or other sports. Populated by teenage assistants in tracksuits giving me looks like "ask me if I'm bovered".

Then went down the local high street. Small running shop. Videoed me running on a treadmill. Showed me why my old trainers were crap. Got a good pair of saucony. Expensive but so far feel good. Guy in the shop was really nice aussie guy. Full of useful advice.

Tried the shoes down the gym an hour or so ago and they felt really good, but I think I'm going to take the advice on this thread and try and run outside more. After all nice weather at the moment.

Cheers.

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Good luck. Lovely weather for it - although I prefer it a little cooler. Being a pasty Jock and all.

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Please don't believe that repeated sprinting will leave your legs in any better shape/less likely to be injured. You have to build up very very very slowly to this. Running too fast too soon is one of the main reasons for injuries in runners.

It is great for your fitness though.

<br >Marathon running good for fitness? Don't think so. It would have to be sprints. In fact, I think any person could maintain excellent conditioning on three exercises: sprints, pushups, and pullups. You can sprint on a bike, up a hill. Cardio? Walking and recreational cycling (the bicycle man's most efficient and beautiful invention). But each to their own, I value my joints.

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Better still, don't run but cycle, more efficient, body weight is supported, low impact and much better on the joints :rolleyes: Seriously we were not designed to run long distances. Sprinting is OK. Put as much effort into cycling and you will go four times faster (and further). I used to run/jog round my local park, and quite frankly the following day felt as though I had been in a car crash.

You sure about that?

Leopards are designed for sprinting, we are designed for long distance. It's why we don't have any hair and we sweat a lot, we can chase down prey over long distances till they fall over from exhaustion.

The problem is we are designed to run barefoot on the balls of our toes, not wearing shoes and pounding down on our heels.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100127134241.htm

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<br >Marathon running good for fitness? Don't think so. It would have to be sprints. In fact, I think any person could maintain excellent conditioning on three exercises: sprints, pushups, and pullups. You can sprint on a bike, up a hill. Cardio? Walking and recreational cycling (the bicycle man's most efficient and beautiful invention). But each to their own, I value my joints.

I agree sprints are great for fitness - I just think people who do it running have to be careful - in fact I think you are saying the same !

Better to do it on wheels or in the pool where the stresses are less. Although if you build it up slow I think running is a good plan. As D.C stated below - it is probably the way we run that is the issue.

You sure about that?

Leopards are designed for sprinting, we are designed for long distance. It's why we don't have any hair and we sweat a lot, we can chase down prey over long distances till they fall over from exhaustion.

The problem is we are designed to run barefoot on the balls of our toes, not wearing shoes and pounding down on our heels.

http://www.scienceda...00127134241.htm

Hence why I have been walking around all day in my 5 fingers !! Tried to run normally on them and it does hurt the heels. You can only run on your forefoot when running with these - just like how we are 'meant' to barefoot.

Quite a scary thought trying to change the way you run completely. Will give it a go though.

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You sure about that?

Leopards are designed for sprinting, we are designed for long distance. It's why we don't have any hair and we sweat a lot, we can chase down prey over long distances till they fall over from exhaustion.

The problem is we are designed to run barefoot on the balls of our toes, not wearing shoes and pounding down on our heels.

http://www.scienceda...00127134241.htm

Thanks for that link. Story had a link to a dedicated website. Great info.

Forefoot

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You sure about that?

Leopards are designed for sprinting, we are designed for long distance. It's why we don't have any hair and we sweat a lot, we can chase down prey over long distances till they fall over from exhaustion.

The problem is we are designed to run barefoot on the balls of our toes, not wearing shoes and pounding down on our heels.

http://www.scienceda...00127134241.htm

There is evidence some hunter gatherer societies did indeed run long distances to trap game, but I suspect more cunning and intelligence was used to trap them, once we had learned to cook/process food and could divert energy away from our large guts to the brain! Virtually everyone I see running seems ill. They are either "obese"or horrendously thin (the very keen runner) and I can't think of a worst way of loosing weight than running. Yes if you can sustain the running over a long period and you don't injure yourself, but I reckon its more likely to make a "fat" person hungry and reaching for the carbs.I cycled past two joggers the other day (both overweight) one complaining to his partner about his aches and pains and injuries, but I just love whizzing past them on my bike, using just a fraction of the energy and without the physical damage. Seems part of the mindset, I'm overweight, must go running. Oh and its got to really boring and tedious, treadmill based and can only be made tolerable with an iPod or staring at a music video in the gym. NO! just walk a bit more, strength training and err.. eat a bit less (especially less wheat / grains and sugar, in fact preferably zero).

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There is evidence some hunter gatherer societies did indeed run long distances to trap game, but I suspect more cunning and intelligence was used to trap them, once we had learned to cook/process food and could divert energy away from our large guts to the brain! Virtually everyone I see running seems ill. They are either "obese"or horrendously thin (the very keen runner) and I can't think of a worst way of loosing weight than running. Yes if you can sustain the running over a long period and you don't injure yourself, but I reckon its more likely to make a "fat" person hungry and reaching for the carbs.I cycled past two joggers the other day (both overweight) one complaining to his partner about his aches and pains and injuries, but I just love whizzing past them on my bike, using just a fraction of the energy and without the physical damage. Seems part of the mindset, I'm overweight, must go running. Oh and its got to really boring and tedious, treadmill based and can only be made tolerable with an iPod or staring at a music video in the gym. NO! just walk a bit more, strength training and err.. eat a bit less (especially less wheat / grains and sugar, in fact preferably zero).

Not sure you are correct there. Plenty of overweight people do run when they should start on something else. Then again many people I see on bikes, or in a swimming pool, or doing any sort of sport look pretty ill and in horrible shape.

You need to do it properly. Just like anything else.

You are right though - plenty of shocking runners out there. I wince when I hear the clunk of their feet on hte tarmac. Then again, when you see the odd person who does it properly, it does look quite beautiful.

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Not sure you are correct there. Plenty of overweight people do run when they should start on something else. Then again many people I see on bikes, or in a swimming pool, or doing any sort of sport look pretty ill and in horrible shape.

You need to do it properly. Just like anything else.

You are right though - plenty of shocking runners out there. I wince when I hear the clunk of their feet on hte tarmac. Then again, when you see the odd person who does it properly, it does look quite beautiful.

I think if you are already pretty athletic, or were good as sports at school and have kept it up, rather than starting afresh after an lapse of 20 or so years, it probably is less of a risk.

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I think if you are already pretty athletic, or were good as sports at school and have kept it up, rather than starting afresh after an lapse of 20 or so years, it probably is less of a risk.

Tip no 1: Don't use a walkman. Listen for your footsteps. Try to make them as quiet as possible.

Tip no 2: Try to glide rather than bounce. That will reduce the impact of each step, and force you to take faster, shorter steps.

Tip no 3: Long slow distance is somewhat boring. To get round this, I go to the running track and try to beat my previous times.

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  • 220 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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