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Gaining Weight

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I'm looking to bulk up again. I did this in the past and went training and did pretty well at it. I know you need to:

1. Eat at least 6-7 smaller meals a day with adequate carbs, good fats and protein

2. Train pretty heavy in lowish rep range in good form to avoid injury

3. BE CONSISTENT.

My big problem was getting an appetite. For sure, it improved after a while when my gut was stretched but it was never ravenous. Oddly smelling onions helped a bit as did a beer before a meal but are there any better ways to improve appetite? I know pharmaceuticaly marinol is useful but I don't really want to go down this path.

Anybody?

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I'm looking to bulk up again. I did this in the past and went training and did pretty well at it. I know you need to:

1. Eat at least 6-7 smaller meals a day with adequate carbs, good fats and protein

2. Train pretty heavy in lowish rep range in good form to avoid injury

3. BE CONSISTENT.

My big problem was getting an appetite. For sure, it improved after a while when my gut was stretched but it was never ravenous. Oddly smelling onions helped a bit as did a beer before a meal but are there any better ways to improve appetite? I know pharmaceuticaly marinol is useful but I don't really want to go down this path.

Anybody?

I don't have a massive appetite so gaining if very difficult for me. Recently I've been taking shots of olive oil or flax oil in concentrated OJ which I got from here.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Tpj0rRX30E&feature=player_embedded

So long as you get your protein and EFA quota I don't see much wrong with this approach if you're really struggling.

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Guest X-QUORK

Heavy cannabis use.

I'm not sure a dozen Krispy Kreme donuts are the kinds of "nutritional" foods needed for weightlifting.

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I'm looking to bulk up again. I did this in the past and went training and did pretty well at it. I know you need to:

1. Eat at least 6-7 smaller meals a day with adequate carbs, good fats and protein

2. Train pretty heavy in lowish rep range in good form to avoid injury

3. BE CONSISTENT.

My big problem was getting an appetite. For sure, it improved after a while when my gut was stretched but it was never ravenous. Oddly smelling onions helped a bit as did a beer before a meal but are there any better ways to improve appetite? I know pharmaceuticaly marinol is useful but I don't really want to go down this path.

Anybody?

Ah Gaining weight - now there is subject on which I can advise on - How I wish I that problem.

eat desert after dinner. eat before bed time.

Always eat breakfast, plenty of carbohydrate rich foods like bread, pasta and potatos. don't do any cardio until you bulk up. if your struggling with your appetite - then try calorie rich snacks such as chocolate bars and crisps. Just Diet in reverse - make sure your eating 500 calories over your BMR, everyday - don't cheat by eating a low cal salad or something. You don't need to stuff yourself with a big meal just make sure your counting the cals - and getting above about 2500 cals per day. Calculate your BMR and work from there.

protein shakes might help - but the the protein might make you more full, obviously you will need meat to help with muscle gain, but it can be filling. Things like mc donalds milkshakes are calorie laden, and not filling, or mcflurrys icecreams - but contain protein in the milk.

Drink a beer after dinner - its all calories.

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Hmm, have to say I don't agree that someone should be using junk food and beer to bulk up.

Sounds like a guarenteed way to end up a fat *******. And if the OP happens to be a naturally skinny ectomorph type he'll end up skinnyfat. Wee skinny arms and legs and a great big gut.

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Hmm, have to say I don't agree that someone should be using junk food and beer to bulk up.

Sounds like a guarenteed way to end up a fat *******. And if the OP happens to be a naturally skinny ectomorph type he'll end up skinnyfat. Wee skinny arms and legs and a great big gut.

Can never figure out what body type I am. I'm not an ectomorph certainly. Think I'm an endomorph with mesomorph tendencies :blink:Then again I'm skinny arms and a fattish gut, yet skinny'ish. Might bulk up too actually. Beats carrying around your loose skin/fat folds in a bucket all day.

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Can never figure out what body type I am. I'm not an ectomorph certainly. Think I'm an endomorph with mesomorph tendencies   :blink:Then again I'm skinny arms and a fattish gut, yet skinny'ish. Might bulk up too actually. Beats carrying around your loose skin/fat folds in a bucket all day.

Eat 4 raw eggs mixed up with 2 teaspoons of sugar for breakfast. Eat a block of cheese before bed... and you'll be a fat ******* in no time.

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I have always eaten whatever I liked- none of your 5 meals a day chicken breast and salad low fat low GI ******. I've very rarely eaten breakfast in the last ten years. And I've always had an 'athletic' build, BMI of 22-23, never been fat. I just didn't eat too much.

Last year I decided to get a bit bigger and so did Stronglifts 5x5. I put on a stone and a half in about 4 months, and looked pretty good on it. But I still didn't bother with any kind of eating program- I'd just eat, in addition to what I'd normally eat, say two extra tins of tuna in oil or 400g of Sainsbury's value mince, fried up every day. And I drank a bit more full fat milk.

I've lost most of it since then- gave up over Christmas, hurt my shoulder, and never got back into it. I started again last week, and after two workouts randomly ricked my back. So I'll probably wait until next week to start again, again. But it works, and I recommend it. And, in my experience, most diet advice is rubbish. As long as you get enough calories and protein in, you'll be fine, your body doesn't really care about what form it takes. If you're an Olympic athlete, maybe it matters. For normal folk, not so much.

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are there any better ways to improve appetite?

Long walks in the fresh air.

Lots of sex.

Taking picolax and not eating for 36 hours.

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Drink whole milk.

Last couple of months I've got more focused on training and to help, I've been drinking 4 pints of whole milk per day, aswell as eating what I would normally. Weights gone from 12 n half stone to 14 stone. I've also been squatting most days, working up to a max for the day then doing some backoff sets, either doubles or some reps. My max squat was fairly low at the start, 140kg. Now my max is 170kg (and I'm close to 175, couldn't quite hit that today). I've put on some decent muscle around my legs, **** and back. Upper body has increased aswell. I'm confident of getting 182.5kg within a month/6 weeks, so then I'll have a 400 lb squat (which will be a little milestone for me). I want 200kg by the end of the year.

So yeah, long story short; if you struggle to eat the calories, drink them (milk). And push up the weight you are using in the powerlifts. You'll get bigger.

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Long walks in the fresh air.

Lots of sex.

Taking picolax and not eating for 36 hours.

Don't know about the picolax, seem to remember that sounded awful, but otherwise, yes.

Sex in the morning will make you want an enormous breakfast.

If you make the long walks at high altitude you'll be chewing your own arm off with hunger by the end of the day.

Edit : That's the appetite bit. For weight gain you need heavy muscle work, in a gym or home-based concrete making for renovation, that kind of thing. In 10 days of concreting I gained a stone, all muscle.

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I'm looking to bulk up again. I did this in the past and went training and did pretty well at it. I know you need to:

1. Eat at least 6-7 smaller meals a day with adequate carbs, good fats and protein

2. Train pretty heavy in lowish rep range in good form to avoid injury

3. BE CONSISTENT.

My big problem was getting an appetite. For sure, it improved after a while when my gut was stretched but it was never ravenous. Oddly smelling onions helped a bit as did a beer before a meal but are there any better ways to improve appetite? I know pharmaceuticaly marinol is useful but I don't really want to go down this path.

Anybody?

Well you're going to provide a little more information.

What's your intake, your current weight and body fat, your age, occupation and activity levels.

Gaining weight at a certain point when training does become very difficult and calorie dense food may be your only option, but I've no idea if you are there.

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I have always eaten whatever I liked- none of your 5 meals a day chicken breast and salad low fat low GI ******. I've very rarely eaten breakfast in the last ten years. And I've always had an 'athletic' build, BMI of 22-23, never been fat. I just didn't eat too much.

Then you're the exception not the rule, so your opinion is irrelevant really.

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This thread is great IMO, legendary in fact. A lot of myths busted, the OP sets it up and all the self proclaimed experts fall into the trap. Brill :)

Eat Clean...Why?

Not sure what myths have been bust.

OP hasn't given enough information, and a few people have said some daft things.

Pretty much a normal thread

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Not sure what myths have been bust.

OP hasn't given enough information, and a few people have said some daft things.

Pretty much a normal thread

You read all 23 pages in about 10 minutes? Are you Short Circuit?

The myth that "clean" calories will magically turn to muscle while "dirty" calories will go to fat is a myth you here every day from the industry and I agree with the OP that it's total BS.

Edit to add: You have to read it all to see that he gives enough information throughout the thread.

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Hmm, have to say I don't agree that someone should be using junk food and beer to bulk up.

Sounds like a guarenteed way to end up a fat *******. And if the OP happens to be a naturally skinny ectomorph type he'll end up skinnyfat. Wee skinny arms and legs and a great big gut.

Have a friend who was like that. Its a terrible look.

Then he developed a medical problems that meant he no longer drinks.

Whoosh, beer gut gone. No special exercises, just no alcohol.

For some folks its easy really if they have the willpower or a really bad scare...

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You read all 23 pages in about 10 minutes? Are you Short Circuit?

The myth that "clean" calories will magically turn to muscle while "dirty" calories will go to fat is a myth you here every day from the industry and I agree with the OP that it's total BS.

Edit to add: You have to read it all to see that he gives enough information throughout the thread.

Well I've been training and coaching for the best part of fifteen years. So no I didn't read all of the thread, I'd be shocked if it wasn't something I heard before.

But then dirty should be defined as food with very little nutritional value outside of the total number of calories. And often food with potentially negative nutritional benefits, the impact on insulin for example when consuming several hundred calories in refined sugar. Managing insulin is important, so a post workout spike, just fine. Pre-sleep; stupid. And then of course it depends on what type of sugar we're talking about, glycemic index differences between maltodextrin and glucose, for instance.

What you eat, when you eat, in what combination, inline with your training needs and nutritional requirements is important. I know some pros (both natural and not) and some of their diets off season are shocking, but it doesn't mean if you eat like a pro, you'll look like one.

So my point to the OP; weight gain if you're 250lbs @ 20% its a different story to being 150lbs @ 8%. Or even 250lbs at 8%, but I suspect if youre 250lb and 8%, you know what you're doing. And of course age makes a big difference. Over 40, getting clean lean muscle is hard work, not impossible, but you need to put in twice the work a 20 year old does, at 20 the advice is basically eat more (anything) train more (anything), sleep more. At 20-30 the body is very forgiving.

Today, I'm 200lbs, 10% @ 5'10", but I'm getting on a bit and my lifestyle has changed so I'm less focused on weight training now. The heaviest I was 230 lbs, and I just couldn't gain anymore and that was on 5k calories a day. At 5k a day, you have no choice but to eat calorie dense foods. But that doesn't mean you dont pay attention to the impact on body chemistry and protein synthesis.

Edit to add: Personally I liked using all natural peanut butter, calorie dense, fair nutrition and easy to eat.

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I'd just keep it fairly simple; it's unlikely the OP needs anything complex at the moment, if he's asking for advice on the subject on this forum!

That's why I suggest drinking the calories, if you struggle to eat them. Unless you're lactose intolerant, drinking milk is pretty easy. Training wise, compound lifts, but do it frequently. I never used to think it wise to train as often as possible, until I started reading some stuff by a guy called John Broz. He coaches olympic-weight lifters in America (including a young prodigy called Pat Mendes, an amazingly strong 19 yr old). Anyway, he has his lifters squat everyday, twice per day. Now, I couldn't handle that, but I have been trying to squat daily. Working up to a max for the day, then doing doubles in the 80-90% range. It's made my squat rocket up and long may it continue.

There's many different approaches to training, you just gotta find one that you want to throw yourself into. The basic premise is lift heavy shit, eat more than you need, rest, repeat.

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eat more than you need

There gets a point, where this is really hard.

Physically you just can’t consume any more, solid or liquid, and liquids have the additional problem of making one feel full.

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Well I've been training and coaching for the best part of fifteen years. So no I didn't read all of the thread, I'd be shocked if it wasn't something I heard before.

But then dirty should be defined as food with very little nutritional value outside of the total number of calories. And often food with potentially negative nutritional benefits, the impact on insulin for example when consuming several hundred calories in refined sugar. Managing insulin is important, so a post workout spike, just fine. Pre-sleep; stupid. And then of course it depends on what type of sugar we're talking about, glycemic index differences between maltodextrin and glucose, for instance.

What you eat, when you eat, in what combination, inline with your training needs and nutritional requirements is important. I know some pros (both natural and not) and some of their diets off season are shocking, but it doesn't mean if you eat like a pro, you'll look like one.

Interesting. I agree with the insulin management stuff, loosing fat (and gaining it) involves a lot of insulin management. Also how its harder work as you get older, especially loosing the fat around your tummy area becomes increasingly impossible (but enough of that, thats for the "loosing weight" thread).What I wanted to ask, is do you think body builders can teach ordinary Joe (or Joanna) in the street, about weight management? Namely carb cycling, cutting and bulking and ... dare I say it the various "sports supplements?"

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Interesting. I agree with the insulin management stuff, loosing fat (and gaining it) involves a lot of insulin management. Also how its harder work as you get older, especially loosing the fat around your tummy area becomes increasingly impossible (but enough of that, thats for the  "loosing weight" thread).What I wanted to ask, is do you think body builders can teach ordinary Joe (or Joanna) in the street, about weight management? Namely carb cycling, cutting and bulking and ... dare I say it the various "sports supplements?"

The science behind the nutritional advice is sound and easy. But bodybuilders aren't the right spokesmen.

When average Joe sees a bodybuilder, he thinks steroids, oh he looks like that because of the gear and in part they are right. Drug abuse is rampant in all sports, the irony of course being where bodybuilding has accepted it, and said okay, we'll have two types of competitions, natural and err, untested. The admission hasn't helped and the naturals don’t get all that much publicity.

The message should come from traditional sports stars, people whom, the average Joe can associate with, but these guys tend to get bought by the diet industry. And that's the second issue; there is a very profitable diet industry that spends billions on marketing traditional diets. To stand a chance of being heard over all of that noise, you need more public recognition than any bodybuilder will ever get.

In the end though, it's far more complex anyway. I hardly coach anymore, and those I do coach find me, I don’t go looking, it's not my main income so I don’t need it. The reason I now do this, I'm not qualified to treat peoples emotional problems. And 9 times out 10, that's what I was doing. People felt that "getting fit" would fix some underlying problem or issue, they didn't really want to train. It's okay, you don’t have to do this, go do something you enjoy, become "fit" as a by product of doing things you enjoy. The guys I coach now, can do it themselves, really, they just need a little direction.

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I should have called the thread increasing appetite, I saw the losing weight thread and tried to be clever. I know what's needed to gain weight, I've done it all before. I know how to train, I know what food to eat. My big problem is appetite and always has been. For the record I have tried:

Veta Salveo (yea okay I shouldn't have and I was warned it was sawdust) needless to say

didn't work, an act of desperation

Beer/Whiskey: works somewhat

Onion/Gut juice stimulation: This works mildly

Does anybody have any other anecdotal evidence of these or any others that they have actually tried? Herbs, spices?

(In answer to other points:

I have to watch cholesterol. Last time I did this I didn't and my calories were quite high. When I had a cholesterol check for something else it was nearly off the scale. I don't want that this time so it will have to be grilled chicken and maltodextrin etc. I Know from past experience, the curry cravings etc. will cease after a withdrawal period and your brain psycholigcaly changes when you train so you are less inclined to eat junk.

The problem with fluids is that not as much is absorbed. Absorption is more important than calories so make the shake extra thick. Of course, as pointed out, this means for a low appetite person it's more difficult to get down your gut, splenda might help a bit here..

ectomorphic/mesomorph

)

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The trouble I find is keeping the weight on. I gained by eating around 4000 calories a day for about a year with little cardio however I couldn't keep my eating schedule up so have pretty much gone back to how I was and I have accepted being slim - obviously I'm naturally designed to be this way.

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