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Tesco Enters The Second-Hand Market

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http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/bargains-and-rip-offs/article.html?in_article_id=505492&in_page_id=5#ixzz0pmTiNRUF

Edit: sorry if it was not clear, but as per the thread subtitle, I was interested in the forums view as to whether Tesco were entering the used goods market as a sign of deteriorating consumer markets.

Were there any signs of this happening in the last recession, or in Japan , the Usa ?

Tesco enters the second-hand market

Tesco is to offer customers second hand goods with shoppers able to sell their old computer games to the supermarket, which will then offer them for sale .

Every little helps: Tesco will sell pre-owned goods for the first time.

However, the retailer will not pay cash to people who sell their games for the popular consoles such as Nintendo's Wii and DSI, the Sony Playstation or Microsoft's xBox.

Instead, it will give them a Tesco money card which can be used in its stores to buy games, other merchandise or groceries.

New games can cost as much as £40, but they quickly become obsolete once the owner has completed all the levels or becomes bored.

Several retailers, such as the specialist firm Game, will allow customers to sell them back, providing they and the boxes are in good condition. Tesco has drawn up a central pricing structure, with a sliding scale as to what a customer will get.

Where a game initially cost £40, Tesco might pay £27 to a customer and then sell it on for £30. The move by Tesco is a concerted attempt to grab customers away from firms such as Game and HMV.

Buying manager John Stanhope said: 'This is a great way for games lovers to get the biggest possible range of entertainment and get a little help with their shopping bill too.'

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Just in time.

The games manufacturers have just introduced single-use serial numbers. If you sell your game, the buyer has to pay £10+ for another serial number or they can't play it AT ALL. Second hand games are about to become worthless.

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Just in time.

The games manufacturers have just introduced single-use serial numbers. If you sell your game, the buyer has to pay £10+ for another serial number or they can't play it AT ALL. Second hand games are about to become worthless.

How does that work then? All I can really find about it is Sims 3 needing registration for additional content/facebook integration. I guess you could force people

to register and link serial to xbox cpu or something but what if my xbox is offline?

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Just in time.

The games manufacturers have just introduced single-use serial numbers. If you sell your game, the buyer has to pay £10+ for another serial number or they can't play it AT ALL. Second hand games are about to become worthless.

Not correct, the game is still usually playable off line, only certain features are reduced for re-use ie. multiplayer & extra goodies. USed prices will be reduced, but certainly not worthless. Ea would be committing financial suicide if they forced it. I think it is $10 not £10

Personally I think will lead to a buyers strike, as it did with the Drm online codes for pc. Used prices are falling pretty quickly anyway these days

Tesco are not idiots, why would they announce going into the market if it was about to be come worthless :rolleyes:

http://www.edge-online.com/news/ubisoft-to-follow-eas-used-game-strategy

Ubisoft is to tackle the second-hand game market with a code system that gives purchasers of new games access to download content which second-hand buyers will have to pay for.

During a recent investors call, Ubisoft seniors said: "We are looking very carefully at what is being done by EA regarding what we call the $10 solution and we will probably follow that line at some time in the future."

The '$10 solution' refers to EA's Online Pass system, in which new games come with a one-use code allowing gamers to access the title's online multiplayer modes, whereas second-hand buyers need to purchase their own code for $10.

Ubisoft went on to indicate that it has a similar code system in place to allow new game consumers access to portions of a game via downloads, which will come at an extra cost to those who buy the game second hand.

Usisoft said: "We have been using keys, starting last year, on our products and those keys were allowing consumers to have download content if they were buying the product in specific stores, so we have the system in place to generate more revenue on the used market and we are now building the content to make sure that it can be beneficial for both groups."

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Guest happy?

....New games can cost as much as £40, but they quickly become obsolete once the owner has completed all the levels or becomes bored.

Several retailers, such as the specialist firm Game, will allow customers to sell them back, providing they and the boxes are in good condition..

In my experience most of Game's customers are in very poor condition - some indeed are complete lard-arses.

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Just in time.

The games manufacturers have just introduced single-use serial numbers. If you sell your game, the buyer has to pay £10+ for another serial number or they can't play it AT ALL. Second hand games are about to become worthless.

You are on the money. All the games companies and console manufacturers are moving towards downloadable games (think apple appstore) specifically because the 2nd hand game market is hurting them. This move by Tesco will might put the final nail in the coffin of high street stores such as Game but it will be very a short lived success if it is a success at all.

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You are on the money. All the games companies and console manufacturers are moving towards downloadable games (think apple appstore) specifically because the 2nd hand game market is hurting them. This move by Tesco will might put the final nail in the coffin of high street stores such as Game but it will be very a short lived success if it is a success at all.

Whilst I agree that download will most likely prevail in the end, I believe it is several years away. I can buy a xbox 360 game, for £40 when it came out, then sell it on ebay /amazon /play for £30 a few weeks later (or minus a £5 second user code fee) or £10 /£15 less to gamestation / .tesco

Why would I throw money away by paying £35/ £30 for a downloadable game which has no resalable value ? There is a danger of simplistically confusing games with cd / apple itunes markets as they cost 4 x as much, and games often take £6 million to develop.

On the wider topic of this thread, I think it is worth keeping an eye out for the supermarkets / big corps. going into used goods markets a furhter sign of consumption decline.

Of course Tesco went into the housing market not so long ago ........oh.. too late we're in the off -topic :D

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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