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Mrs Bear

Skool Leavers: 190 Out Of 220 Rejected

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Letter in The Times today:

'In the debate about the new Government's changes to the school system no one seems to focus on the fact that the current system does not work.

My business advertised for a receptionist. We had 220 applicants. We asked every applicant to enclose a handwritten letter applying for the job, and stating why they should be employed. We rejected 190 immediately because the applicants could not write, spell or construct a sentence in English.

The tragedy was that they all really wanted the job. The current system is failing the pupils in the most horrific way if school-leavers cannot write a simple letter applying for a job.'

I can't help wondering

a] how many of the 30 who didn't fail the first hurdle, had had the wit to write their letter on the computer first, spell-check it, and then copy it out in their best joined-up.

and

b] how many of the 190 rejects had still managed a C in GCSE Eng Lang.

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Misleading title innit? Those who can write aspire to better things than a receptionist job (meaning many are due big disappointment, but not quite yet). So that should at best read "190 of 220 unambitious skool levers ..."

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Misleading title innit? Those who can write aspire to better things than a receptionist job (meaning many are due big disappointment, but not quite yet). So that should at best read "190 of 220 unambitious skool levers ..."

The first requirement when leaving school is simply to get a job. Not many walk into a highly skilled job on a great salary. Furthermore if I owned a company I wouldn't hire a receptionist who couldn't construct a sentence.

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Letter in The Times today:

'In the debate about the new Government's changes to the school system no one seems to focus on the fact that the current system does not work.

My business advertised for a receptionist. We had 220 applicants. We asked every applicant to enclose a handwritten letter applying for the job, and stating why they should be employed. We rejected 190 immediately because the applicants could not write, spell or construct a sentence in English.

The tragedy was that they all really wanted the job. The current system is failing the pupils in the most horrific way if school-leavers cannot write a simple letter applying for a job.'

I can't help wondering

a] how many of the 30 who didn't fail the first hurdle, had had the wit to write their letter on the computer first, spell-check it, and then copy it out in their best joined-up.

and

b] how many of the 190 rejects had still managed a C in GCSE Eng Lang.

I hate hand written applications, generally I have not written much since my ACCA exams so it genuinely hurts my wrist. Unrelated a 19621 mile trek on a motorbike also ruined my thumbs and my wrists too!

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Not many walk into a highly skilled job on a great salary.

Those who can write are encouraged to stay in the education system. It takes an unusual family or a strong-willed youngster to resist the pressure of the norm.

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I hate hand written applications, generally I have not written much since my ACCA exams so it genuinely hurts my wrist. Unrelated a 19621 mile trek on a motorbike also ruined my thumbs and my wrists too!

I've been using computers for so long that my hand writing has degraded to near-doctor standards...

But I've seen B.Sc. candidates who not only couldn't handle basic trigonometry, but - and this is the annoying bit - seemed slightly outraged that they should be expected to handle it.

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Those who can write are encouraged to stay in the education system. It takes an unusual family or a strong-willed youngster to resist the pressure of the norm.

Guess we've come a long way since the 16th century...

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Those who can write are encouraged to stay in the education system. It takes an unusual family or a strong-willed youngster to resist the pressure of the norm.

What!! Don't you know there is a national shortage of sociology graduates, and we are far from fulfilling the 5-year plan for media studies 2.2s?

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Those who can write are encouraged to stay in the education system. It takes an unusual family or a strong-willed youngster to resist the pressure of the norm.

Even if they stay in education, the problem still remains. Experience is king, for the majority "further education" = a few more years of p*ssing around.

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A friend who owns a media company is regularly complaining that many of his graduate recruits (including graduates from Oxbridge) are incapable of writing a basic letter. It hardly gives one confidence in the education system. I'm not a teacher but I recently attended a big teacher training conference and one thing above all struck me. The need to inspire children was emphasised over and over again, but the need to educate them and teach them important skills was such a secondary consideration as to be almost entirely absent. I was left thinking that our education system gives our children a sense of ambition, confidence and drive (which is admirable) without properly equipping them to turn those ambitions into reality.

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I've been using computers for so long that my hand writing has degraded to near-doctor standards...

But I've seen B.Sc. candidates who not only couldn't handle basic trigonometry, but - and this is the annoying bit - seemed slightly outraged that they should be expected to handle it.

trig as in

Silly old horses

Tits Oral Ar5e

Cum And head

All Socialists Talk Crap

Damn I still remember these from school due to a very interesting maths teacher

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I've been using computers for so long that my hand writing has degraded to near-doctor standards...

But I've seen B.Sc. candidates who not only couldn't handle basic trigonometry, but - and this is the annoying bit - seemed slightly outraged that they should be expected to handle it.

I taught a student in the third year of her biology degree how to add fractions. She got the second highest first that year at Oxford. A very common refrain I heard whilst teaching statistics, "but I did biology because I'm no good at math."

There was one guy who applied for a position in English literature at my college who was asked at interview what was his favorite book - not the most unusual question for someone intending to read English literature. After some very interesting discussions, it turned out he had never read a book from start to finish.

You should see many of the attempts at basic exams in maths and physics by prospective candidates.

Truly breathtaking, and all of them predicted 3As at A-Level.

What do people do for 12 years at school these days?

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Funny thing is, these kids coming to the market now are the product of Nu Labia.

Was it not on QT the other day that Campbell (could have been elsewhere) said they were proud of their education policies? You have got to be kidding me!

If you want a prime example of how kids talk these days (let alone write), then check out "FatBoy" from Eastenders. This is the youth of today.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6UXCtn9TIk

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I hate hand written applications, generally I have not written much since my ACCA exams so it genuinely hurts my wrist. Unrelated a 19621 mile trek on a motorbike also ruined my thumbs and my wrists too!

Chord struck here. How many of us actually write anything any more, other than a birthday card, holiday postcards or the odd shopping list?

A few yrs ago I did a couple of OU courses in subjects I'd known damn all about before.

I literally had to train myself for the exams - 3 hours of non-stop, reasonably legible essay writing - with a pen!

Nightmare.

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I hate hand written applications, generally I have not written much since my ACCA exams so it genuinely hurts my wrist.

That bring back memories (or in the case of paper 14/3.6 nightmares).

Still write phone notes etc by hand, much to the annoyance of pretty much everyone else in the office.

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Chord struck here. How many of us actually write anything any more, other than a birthday card, holiday postcards or the odd shopping list?

A few yrs ago I did a couple of OU courses in subjects I'd known damn all about before.

I literally had to train myself for the exams - 3 hours of non-stop, reasonably legible essay writing - with a pen!

Nightmare.

I hate the essays at OU. I average about 80 - 85 for those. Prefer the Maths, easy to get 100.

Fluffy666, I can do trig, I can even integrate. Do I get the job?

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trig as in

Silly old horses

Tits Oral Ar5e

Cum And head

All Socialists Talk Crap

Damn I still remember these from school due to a very interesting maths teacher

No I remember

Oranges have sections

Apples have cores

Opposite over adjacent

but 'All Socialists Talk Crap'? May be true but how does it relate to trig?

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but 'All Socialists Talk Crap'? May be true but how does it relate to trig?

It tells you which funtions are +ve as you go around the circle in quadrants. All, Sine, Tangent, Cosine.

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Letter in The Times today:

'In the debate about the new Government's changes to the school system no one seems to focus on the fact that the current system does not work.

My business advertised for a receptionist. We had 220 applicants. We asked every applicant to enclose a handwritten letter applying for the job, and stating why they should be employed. We rejected 190 immediately because the applicants could not write, spell or construct a sentence in English.

The tragedy was that they all really wanted the job. The current system is failing the pupils in the most horrific way if school-leavers cannot write a simple letter applying for a job.'

I can't help wondering

a] how many of the 30 who didn't fail the first hurdle, had had the wit to write their letter on the computer first, spell-check it, and then copy it out in their best joined-up.

and

b] how many of the 190 rejects had still managed a C in GCSE Eng Lang.

2 mch txtin nwdys

l8r y'al

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I hate the essays at OU. I average about 80 - 85 for those. Prefer the Maths, easy to get 100.

Fluffy666, I can do trig, I can even integrate. Do I get the job?

Well, easy for some. ;)

Give me the 'starter' classical Greek any day, but same principle.

No essays, just grammar and vocab, right or wrong.

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I can't help wondering

a] how many of the 30 who didn't fail the first hurdle, had had the wit to write their letter on the computer first, spell-check it, and then copy it out in their best joined-up.

and

b] how many of the 190 rejects had still managed a C in GCSE Eng Lang.

These figures don't surprise me.

I'd like to know how this compares to 15, 20, 30 years ago, when people didn't have computers to check their spelling.

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These figures don't surprise me.

I'd like to know how this compares to 15, 20, 30 years ago, when people didn't have computers to check their spelling.

Not convinced it's a computer problem, more an expectations problem.

30 years ago students were expected to be able to write and spell and were marked down if they could not. In these days of prizes for all it seems that it's considered unimportant so long as the student can convey their meaning.

Not sure how the schools expect anyone to be able to hold down a job with these literacy levels, then again if their exam results are ok I'm not sure they really care.

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Guest absolutezero

A friend who owns a media company is regularly complaining that many of his graduate recruits (including graduates from Oxbridge) are incapable of writing a basic letter. It hardly gives one confidence in the education system. I'm not a teacher but I recently attended a big teacher training conference and one thing above all struck me. The need to inspire children was emphasised over and over again, but the need to educate them and teach them important skills was such a secondary consideration as to be almost entirely absent. I was left thinking that our education system gives our children a sense of ambition, confidence and drive (which is admirable) without properly equipping them to turn those ambitions into reality.

And there is the biggest problem.

The current drive from OfSTED is 'independent learning'.

In other words if you actually teach them something you will get graded as "inadequate". They want to see 'group work' with the teacher 'facilitating'.

I'd like to know how to do that when I'm supposed to be teaching them how to work out the speed of a car after a collision with another or why a wire gets hot when electric current is passed through it.

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Guest absolutezero

I taught a student in the third year of her biology degree how to add fractions. She got the second highest first that year at Oxford. A very common refrain I heard whilst teaching statistics, "but I did biology because I'm no good at math."

There was one guy who applied for a position in English literature at my college who was asked at interview what was his favorite book - not the most unusual question for someone intending to read English literature. After some very interesting discussions, it turned out he had never read a book from start to finish.

You should see many of the attempts at basic exams in maths and physics by prospective candidates.

Truly breathtaking, and all of them predicted 3As at A-Level.

What do people do for 12 years at school these days?

"Independent learning."

Great for undergraduates perhaps. Not so good for 13 year olds.

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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