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Frankyizzy

Electric Shock Insurance Payout!

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Hi

This is my first time posting so please be gentle!!!

I found this site and it seems like there are plenty of knowledgeable people on here that may be able to help me with a problem I have?

I bought a lamp last year and used for 8mths, unfortunately it then gave me a really bad electric shock that meant I had to get an ambulance and also go to the doctor the following week. I have been left with a bad shoulder and kneck from the fall it caused and also a real fear of electricity - when I fell I hit my baby on the way down so when the ambulance driver came he had to check her out too. He said that other than the head cut she had she was fine but would have definately been killed if I was still holding her at the time I turned it on, or if any of the other children had turned it on they would have been killed.

I went back to the store where I got it from and they referred it on to their insurance group, they Insurance group took the lamp for investigation and have now come back saying that they accept liability and will themselves be taking it up with the company that supplied it. I now have to see a Doctor to have a report taken as to my injuries and long term effects mentally. The Insurance company have then said that they will make me an offer based upon all of the information.

What I need to know is what should I accept (ball park figure) I am worried that I may think it is worth more than it is or accept less than it is worth. How can I find out more?

Many thanks in advance for any help - and no my hair isn't still on end!

Frankyizzy xx

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Sorry I thought as there where topics about giving up smoking and stuff that it was for everything, thanks for letting me know will try elsewhere.

Frankyizzyx

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The other poster was being sarcastic. You could try one of the compensation lawyers who advertise on TV and the internet for no fee claims - they would advise you how much you could claim. Based on your story I think you need professional help. Most lawyers will talk to you for 10- 20 mins for free to see if you have a case

More realistic than sarcastic: legal advice here may be good, but only by coincidence, and could easily be more dangerous than the lamp.

A lawyer is a huge parasite. Involving one here (your free consultation is their cost of making a sale) would IMHO be way OTT for a case where you seem to have made so much progress already.

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Hi

Thanks for that advice I did think about the Solicitor route but didn't know if it would be worth it?

Thanks for the apology also - you have been very helpfull.

Frankyizzy xxx

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More realistic than sarcastic: legal advice here may be good, but only by coincidence, and could easily be more dangerous than the lamp.

A lawyer is a huge parasite. Involving one here (your free consultation is their cost of making a sale) would IMHO be way OTT for a case where you seem to have made so much progress already.

Case in point

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Do you have home insurance?

If so, check to see if you have legal expenses cover (about £20 a year usually). Call your insurer and they will refer you to a panel firm who will handle a claim for you.

When deciding whether to take on a claim, any lawyer will look at three things:

1. Liability - can we prove that someone else was negligent?

2. Causation - can we prove that this negligence caused our client's injury?

3. Quantum - is our client's injury serious enough that it warrants making a claim? £1000 is usually the minimum

From what you have said, you have a written admission of 1. Ambulance attendance and GP both establish 2.

By a process of deduction, 3 looks OK. If you have had symptoms for 4-6 weeks at least then you should be fine.

Most lawyers will arrange for you to go for a medical. Apart from that, the only thing you have to do is fill out some forms.

A first offer from the insurer is likely to be on the low side, especially if they are dealing with you directly and don't think that you are seeking legal advice.

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Do you have home insurance?

If so, check to see if you have legal expenses cover (about £20 a year usually). Call your insurer and they will refer you to a panel firm who will handle a claim for you.

When deciding whether to take on a claim, any lawyer will look at three things:

1. Liability - can we prove that someone else was negligent?

2. Causation - can we prove that this negligence caused our client's injury?

3. Quantum - is our client's injury serious enough that it warrants making a claim? £1000 is usually the minimum

From what you have said, you have a written admission of 1. Ambulance attendance and GP both establish 2.

By a process of deduction, 3 looks OK. If you have had symptoms for 4-6 weeks at least then you should be fine.

Most lawyers will arrange for you to go for a medical. Apart from that, the only thing you have to do is fill out some forms.

A first offer from the insurer is likely to be on the low side, especially if they are dealing with you directly and don't think that you are seeking legal advice.

Thanks for the advice about the Home Insurance, you are right I do have that so will call them asap

Thanks again x

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Thanks for the advice about the Home Insurance, you are right I do have that so will call them asap

Thanks again x

Glad to have helped. All the best.

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Do you have home insurance?

If so, check to see if you have legal expenses cover (about £20 a year usually). Call your insurer and they will refer you to a panel firm who will handle a claim for you.

When deciding whether to take on a claim, any lawyer will look at three things:

1. Liability - can we prove that someone else was negligent?

2. Causation - can we prove that this negligence caused our client's injury?

3. Quantum - is our client's injury serious enough that it warrants making a claim? £1000 is usually the minimum

From what you have said, you have a written admission of 1. Ambulance attendance and GP both establish 2.

By a process of deduction, 3 looks OK. If you have had symptoms for 4-6 weeks at least then you should be fine.

Most lawyers will arrange for you to go for a medical. Apart from that, the only thing you have to do is fill out some forms.

A first offer from the insurer is likely to be on the low side, especially if they are dealing with you directly and don't think that you are seeking legal advice.

He's a solicitor!

Who's got the torches? Pitchforks?

Right...

BURN HIMMMM!!!!!!!!

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He's a solicitor!

Who's got the torches? Pitchforks?

Right...

BURN HIMMMM!!!!!!!!

Watch out ...

1. Liability - can we prove that someone else was negligent? Yes you burned him.

2. Causation - can we prove that this negligence caused our client's injury? Yes the injury was caused by the burns.

3. Quantum - is our client's injury serious enough that it warrants making a claim? £1000 is usually the minimum. Yes! Lets sue!

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This is an odd case. Was it a ceiling light firtting or a bedside lamp. If so it is very hazzadous in yor place. If it was a ceiling fitting you maybe stitches up. Insurance companies may not pay up as you did not do a risk assesment if there are children un the roo. Another thing were you doing something an electrician should be doing. I know it sounds rubbish Health and safty restriction on you are't just the product of Wolley left wing do gooders they arise from Insurance companies who don't want to pay out too.

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poor sod.

electric shocks aren't nice at the best of times.

if the item you bought was less than a year or so old,it ought to be fully covered under warranty....which also means electrically safety compliant....as long as you weren't doing something realy stupid like using it as swimming-pool lighting.

as for the shock itself,these can be very serious(in first aid terms,most shocks are to be treated on the same level of severity as full-thickness burns).

that's quite a nasty injury.

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poor sod.

electric shocks aren't nice at the best of times.

So what turns an electric shock from "ouch, static" or "oops, that was the mains" (i.e. a shock but absolutely not anything serious) into something nasty? A medical condition would be an obvious candidate, but what else matters?

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Hi

This is my first time posting so please be gentle!!!

I found this site and it seems like there are plenty of knowledgeable people on here that may be able to help me with a problem I have?

I bought a lamp last year and used for 8mths, unfortunately it then gave me a really bad electric shock that meant I had to get an ambulance and also go to the doctor the following week. I have been left with a bad shoulder and kneck from the fall it caused and also a real fear of electricity - when I fell I hit my baby on the way down so when the ambulance driver came he had to check her out too. He said that other than the head cut she had she was fine but would have definately been killed if I was still holding her at the time I turned it on, or if any of the other children had turned it on they would have been killed.

<SNIP>

I agree that you should go to a personal industry specialist. They may be sharks etc, but they will be your shark as long as you check out the fee structure is all above board as far as it will impact you.

If some liability has been already been admitted (did you keep evidence) then I guess you have a solid case. The key thing will then be what they offer, as you can't really go to court before you have given them a chance to make a reasonable offer - you can then of course reject that offer and see if they offer more. If not then you can chose to go to Court. I guess the injury specialist will know what is reasonable for the level of injury, if the offer is lower then they'll recommend court as long as the right evidence has been collected to put a case together.

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So what turns an electric shock from "ouch, static" or "oops, that was the mains" (i.e. a shock but absolutely not anything serious) into something nasty? A medical condition would be an obvious candidate, but what else matters?

Hi

Thanks for all of the replys - in short:

It was a table lamp that after being used for a few months in the lounge the top came loose (metal cover covering the prongs) exposing the 2 prongs which I stuck my thumb on when I put my hand up under the shade to turn the switch on - the lamp base was metal too. It seems also that the lamp did not have an earth as rather than just blow the lamp and the mains box it blew me 4 feet backwards and yes it was ouch! Still have problems with my arm and shoulder now and a real fear of electricity especially around the kids!

Also not sure if it is attached, but I seem to contract viral meningitis 3 weeks later perhaps due to being very run down after the shock

Frankyizzyx

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  • 197 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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