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Photo-Essay Of 1950's London

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Interesting blog from Charles Hugh-Smith with some photos of 1950's London, showing how a large, advanced capital city can function effectively (probably more effectively than it does now) without vast amounts of petrol-driven transport: http://www.oftwominds.com/blogmay10/1950s-London05-10.html

It reminds me that even in my childhood I used to see rag-and-bone men (horse driven) up until the late '70's. I expect to see a return of these gentlemen very soon. Anyone seen any yet?

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It reminds me that even in my childhood I used to see rag-and-bone men (horse driven) up until the late '70's. I expect to see a return of these gentlemen very soon. Anyone seen any yet?

There's a thread on rag and bone men - apparently they're motoring around the streets as we speak, blowing trumpets and getting stopped by the bill. In Ireland they're called tinkers.

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There's a thread on rag and bone men - apparently they're motoring around the streets as we speak, blowing trumpets and getting stopped by the bill. In Ireland they're called tinkers.

Ah yeah, this one: http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=143991&st=0

OK, my next prediction is lots of people selling their cars and travelling on cheapo mopeds.

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Excellent thread and links CST.I've been cycling around London and my hometown and wondering about the insanity. Empty pavements and full roads, with virtually everyone moving around (even if only a mile or two) in their steel, plastic and rubber, four wheeled overcoats.

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Interesting blog from Charles Hugh-Smith with some photos of 1950's London, showing how a large, advanced capital city can function effectively (probably more effectively than it does now) without vast amounts of petrol-driven transport: http://www.oftwomind...ondon05-10.html

It reminds me that even in my childhood I used to see rag-and-bone men (horse driven) up until the late '70's. I expect to see a return of these gentlemen very soon. Anyone seen any yet?

Amazingly, Tubby Izaacs is still there.

Edited by tbatst2000

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Interesting blog from Charles Hugh-Smith with some photos of 1950's London, showing how a large, advanced capital city can function effectively (probably more effectively than it does now) without vast amounts of petrol-driven transport: http://www.oftwomind...ondon05-10.html

It reminds me that even in my childhood I used to see rag-and-bone men (horse driven) up until the late '70's. I expect to see a return of these gentlemen very soon. Anyone seen any yet?

Amazingly, Tubby Izaacs is still there.

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OK, my next prediction is lots of people selling their cars and travelling on cheapo mopeds.

Cheap mopeds are cheap because they are unreliable Chinese rubbish. Decent quality stuff might cost 2k or more so can actually end quite costly. Cars on the other hand can be had for a few hundred Pound and can be pretty reliable at that price. I may buy a step-thru scooter myself but I'll be mainly for the fun of it...try not to laugh!

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Cheap mopeds are cheap because they are unreliable Chinese rubbish. Decent quality stuff might cost 2k or more so can actually end quite costly. Cars on the other hand can be had for a few hundred Pound and can be pretty reliable at that price. I may buy a step-thru scooter myself but I'll be mainly for the fun of it...try not to laugh!

That's a good point, but I was thinking more from the fuel consumption point of view rather than the initial investment.

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That's a good point, but I was thinking more from the fuel consumption point of view rather than the initial investment.

I think a lot of scooters will only do 70 mpg or so so not so good considering their weight and size. My old Nissan van will do 50mpg and many small cars will do 60 to 70. Having done a bit of research I'd say that a Kymco Nexxon 125 (Taiwanese- 120mpg!) could be a good bet.(1,300 to 1,400)

Where's Ken? He'll put us right!

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Interesting blog from Charles Hugh-Smith with some photos of 1950's London, showing how a large, advanced capital city can function effectively (probably more effectively than it does now) without vast amounts of petrol-driven transport: http://www.oftwominds.com/blogmay10/1950s-London05-10.html

He is somewhat romantic about that, when you look closer what you actually see is poverty and lack of good equipment, not eco-friendliness at all. Pushing wheelbarrows to unload/transport stuff often meant an early grave, as the body does wear out in your 50's,especially if you have to lift the goods by hand when you don't have a forklift handy.

The system was barely functional back then and extracted a a high cost in terms of human and animal misery, not to mention the proportion that transport cost back then and the problem of commuting to work on time and without arriving filthy and tired.. And we'd need to move the factories back into London too, the air will absolutely reek from that, not to mention the stink from pigs and their droppings or the chicken stench from people's backyards as food production will become more local. Stinky diesel fumes are perfume in comparison.

I don't think that this will be an improvement over today, it never was all that great, check out the older London too:

42. ELIZABETHAN LONDON.

PART III.

The population of London at this time was perhaps, for it is not certain, 150,000. There were no suburbs, unless we call the Strand and Smithfield suburbs; the London citizen stepped outside the gates into the open country. This fact must be remembered when we think of the narrow lanes. The great danger of the City still remained, that of fire, for though the better houses were built of stone, the inferior sort, as was stated above, continued to be built of timber and plaster. There were no vehicles in the streets except carts, and the number of these was restricted to 420. When you think of London streets at this time remember that in most of them, in all except the busy streets and the chief thoroughfares, there was hardly ever any noise of rumbling wheels. The packhorses followed each other in long procession, laden with everything; there were doubtless wheelbarrows and hand carts; but the rumbling of the wheels was not yet a part of the daily noise.

also:

(Under George the second)

To walk in the streets meant the encounter of roughness and rudeness which would now be thought intolerable. There were no police to keep order: if a man wanted order he might fight for it. Fights, indeed, were common in the streets: the waggoners, the hackney coachmen, the men with the wheelbarrows, the porters who carried things, were always fighting in the streets: gentlemen were hustled by bullies, and often had to fight them: most men carried a thick cudgel for self-protection.

The streets were far noisier in the last century than ever they had been before. Chiefly, this was due to the enormous increase of wheeled vehicles. Formerly everything came into the City or went out of it on the backs of pack-horses and pack-asses. Now the roads were so much improved that waggons could be used for everything, and the long lines of pack-horses had disappeared from the main roads. In the country lanes the pack-horse was still employed. Everybody was able to ride, and the City apprentice, when he had a holiday, always spent it on horseback. But for everyday the hackney coach was used. Smaller carts were also coming into use. And for dragging about barrels of beer and heavy cases a dray of iron, without wheels, was used. All these innovations meant more noise and still more noise. Had Whittington, in the time of George II., sat down on Highgate Hill (still a grassy slope), he would have heard, loud above the sound of Bow Bells, the rumbling of the waggons on Cheapside.

The entire book can be found as an audio book (or html version) here: http://librivox.org/the-history-of-london-by-walter-besant/

C

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Excellent thread and links CST.I've been cycling around London and my hometown and wondering about the insanity. Empty pavements and full roads, with virtually everyone moving around (even if only a mile or two) in their steel, plastic and rubber, four wheeled overcoats.

Comfy, warm or cool - your choice, relaxed, radio on, light breeze from the blower, coat on the seat, shades on, sat nav telling you where to go so you don;t even need to pick up a map. Just like a mobile extension of your front room.

The only thing that will get people out of their cars is when they cost too much.

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Interesting blog from Charles Hugh-Smith with some photos of 1950's London, showing how a large, advanced capital city can function effectively (probably more effectively than it does now) without vast amounts of petrol-driven transport: http://www.oftwominds.com/blogmay10/1950s-London05-10.html

It reminds me that even in my childhood I used to see rag-and-bone men (horse driven) up until the late '70's. I expect to see a return of these gentlemen very soon. Anyone seen any yet?

whilst hes on the right path i dont think hes going back far enough for a picture future london which is likely much better represented by

GinLane.jpg

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I can remember Tubby Issacs from the late 1970's. At that time it was the only place in London where you could get a cup of tea at 5 in the morning and something to eat if you were not to fussy about what it was.

Used to deliver a lot of army mail and signals (telex), bit like faxes today but fax machines were few and far between then.

Me on my trusty BSA 500 army motorbike zapping around the Londist Military installations from Horse Guards to the Tower to West Ham in the East and RAF Uxbridge in the West. Great Days.

Even at the time when the Falklands kicked off I can recall delivering the signals (by DON R) as we were called (army speak for despatch rider) to units around London telling them the news and to mobilize.

Seemed the traffic was a hell of a lot lighter in those days as well and the lack of speed camera's meant I could do 70mph down the City Road. The police used to leave me alone as I had a registration place they could not understand.

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Interesting blog from Charles Hugh-Smith with some photos of 1950's London, showing how a large, advanced capital city can function effectively (probably more effectively than it does now) without vast amounts of petrol-driven transport: http://www.oftwomind...ondon05-10.html

It reminds me that even in my childhood I used to see rag-and-bone men (horse driven) up until the late '70's. I expect to see a return of these gentlemen very soon. Anyone seen any yet?

we still have these - gypsies looking for scrap metal mostly - and yes some of them have horse drawn wagons

Yorkshire is a strange place I can tell thee

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Excellent thread and links CST.I've been cycling around London and my hometown and wondering about the insanity. Empty pavements and full roads, with virtually everyone moving around (even if only a mile or two) in their steel, plastic and rubber, four wheeled overcoats.

Problem is it becomes self-fulfilling. The more cars there are, the more unpleasant and downright dangerous it becomes to get around on foot or by bicycle. So more people take to their cars, and so on and so on. And kids don't get around on bicycles or on foot because it is so much more dangerous. The lack of pedestrian crossings is scandalous, given that put someone in a car and they assume automatically that it is their right of way whatever the circumstances. It is absolutely insane.

Comfy, warm or cool - your choice, relaxed, radio on, light breeze from the blower, coat on the seat, shades on, sat nav telling you where to go so you don;t even need to pick up a map. Just like a mobile extension of your front room.

The only thing that will get people out of their cars is when they cost too much.

Except when your extension is immobile in a traffic jam. Driving within towns and cities should be made a lot more expensive and inconvenient - light blue touch paper, stand back and enjoy.

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Add in parents driving their kids to school half a mile down the road. Is this an urban myth? Do the parents then drive on to work, or drive home again?

I work close to a non-Job Centre, by a park where I occasionally have lunch. I sometimes see people rocking up in some fairly decent cars, park, go in and come out 10 mins later. I wonder what they are doing? I don't think they work there.

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Except when your extension is immobile in a traffic jam. Driving within towns and cities should be made a lot more expensive and inconvenient - light blue touch paper, stand back and enjoy.

My argument would be that the alternative should be much easier and better. Truro splashed on a huge cheap park and ride service with very frequent shuttles. It is now widely used by many including by me; I still drive in occasionally but generally prefer not to.

No need for penalties or punishments, just improve the alternatives.

If there was a quick and convenient bus into work I would probably go in on that on the days that I don't need a car at work. There isn't and there is no prospect of one.

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Interesting blog from Charles Hugh-Smith with some photos of 1950's London, showing how a large, advanced capital city can function effectively (probably more effectively than it does now) without vast amounts of petrol-driven transport: http://www.oftwominds.com/blogmay10/1950s-London05-10.html

It reminds me that even in my childhood I used to see rag-and-bone men (horse driven) up until the late '70's. I expect to see a return of these gentlemen very soon. Anyone seen any yet?

Wonderful photos; those from the 60s on a linked page show the docks when they were still working.

Thanks for this

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Great slide show........how the West End has changed over the last 50 years, some for the good, was a bit seedy in those days, mostly not so good, the community village spirit was alive and very much kicking then. Notice the absence of yellow lines and parking restrictions, people had more freedom to be what they wanted to be then. ;)

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That looks positively clean and orderly. People were more self reliant back then, plus there really werent the assortment of narcotics then. When/if we face economic realities i expect London to resemble a South American slum city.

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  • 196 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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