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But would you want foreigners to stop importing British products and services as well?

Should every country have a closed economy?

Or specialise in what each do better, and then trade? We had a few centuries of it. It has worked well.

Progress depend on trade. The freer the better. It has worked for centuries.

Protectionism on the other hand is a major cause of divergence of interests and wars, including the 1st and 2nd world wars.

For instance (just a basic example, but it is valid for other products as well) : If we try to grow bananas we'll need heated greenhouses, and tropical countries could grow pears only in air-conditioned green houses. This would make all products much more expensive to make, and much more expensive for everybody. Would we be "protecting" our individual countries. :)

Same thing for other products and services. Google "David Ricardo".

Edit: And no, races to the bottom (in salaries and labour standards) don't happen, didn't happen since the industrial revolution, quite the opposite. The poorer country develops, and increases global wealth.

I think what we should do is not go the protectionist nut-job way of N. Korea but have a system by where some industries are guaranteed.

For instance indigenous food and beverage production should be strongly supported, and foreign foodstuffs of indigenous type should be taxed. For instance importing apples from spain, when they can be grown 2 miles down the road in Kent is simply insanely ludicrous. However, non-indigenous food types such as bananas, kiwis, coffee, chocolate etc should not receive any form of tax.

I would also have a list of major UK companies that had to manufacture their goods in the UK and could never become foreign owned, under Act of Parliement.

E.g

Rolls Royce

BAE

Cadburies

Land Rover/Jaguar

Corus

The reason for doing this is because the jobs and wealth these companies provide are so eminently important, that to live without them would cause great harm to the British economy.

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Of course it's going to be more expensive , since you are paying more than 5p/hour for it.

Just buy less stuff.

Oh i can see why the whole buy britain campaign failed now laugh.gif

The funny thing is - I earn a fair amount - enough to put me in the top 5% I would think - yet I buy hardly anything - because I spend so much on rent, food, cars, car tax, car insurance, life insurance, contents insurance, mobile phone, phone, broadband, tax, council tax, petrol etc that I haven't got enough to spend on 'stuff'. I buy what I have to.

How people on average salaries manage is beyond me.

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I think what we should do is not go the protectionist nut-job way of N. Korea but have a system by where some industries are guaranteed.

For instance indigenous food and beverage production should be strongly supported, and foreign foodstuffs of indigenous type should be taxed. For instance importing apples from spain, when they can be grown 2 miles down the road in Kent is simply insanely ludicrous. However, non-indigenous food types such as bananas, kiwis, coffee, chocolate etc should not receive any form of tax.

I would also have a list of major UK companies that had to manufacture their goods in the UK and could never become foreign owned, under Act of Parliement.

E.g

Rolls Royce

BAE

Cadburies

Land Rover/Jaguar

Corus

The reason for doing this is because the jobs and wealth these companies provide are so eminently important, that to live without them would cause great harm to the British economy.

The problem is that, if it not the market that decides all these things, then it will have to be politicians and a government bureaucracy. They are much worse than markets, always, and everywhere. Planned economies have been tried before, many times. ;) They never work, and never will, because reality is too complex for planning. Markets do work much much better - by comparison.

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Here's a radical thought.

British manufacturing got priced out by companies with cheaper labour costs.

A large percentage of the average worker's wages is spent on putting a roof over their heads.

If houses were cheaper, wages could be lower and we would be able to compete in world markets.

I don't know when it is going to permeate through to the generally moronic public that their obsession with high house prices, eventually, will turn us into a third world nation.

That is one of those things that is as at the same time absolutely obvious and completely ignored.

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One of my favourite points. High house prices (i.e. big debt) just makes the labour of this country uncompetitive.

I wonder when/if someone in the coalition will pick up on this and start talking sense.

How about St. Vince? It's time for someone to start talking housing/land/commercial property down - time for them to change the nation's thinking so that the Daily Express can no longer print stupid 'Hooray, House Prices Up' headlines.

The short sightedness of this obsession with house prices is enough to make you weep.

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I do buy some local stuff - my last belt was direct from Pittards own factory shop here in Yeovil, tanned and made on-site. A fair number of motorcycle leather goods (gloves, etc) are made with Pittards leather too.

I'd have no problem paying more for British - we just don't, as a rule, advertise what is totally British that much currently.

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This has been tried before ... 'I'm Backing Britain' I think it was - back in the 1970s.

No-one took any notice of it then and they won't now.

Don't be too cynical.

I was watching a program on TV in the week, about young entrepreneurs. There was a girl who made scarves, and they brought in some City shyster to talk her into moving the production to China or India, she resisted thankfully, and put him in his place.

We need more of this type of girl in our country, and hopefully someone in government was watching and will give her, and those like her, the support they need.

Edited by Britney's Piers

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We need more of this type of girl in our country, and hopefully someone in government was watching and will give her, and those like her, the support they need.

She sounds a decent sort. But the government should absolutely not be putting taxpayers money her way just because of it. That's the road to socialist ruin: starts off well-intentioned, but moves rapidly to backing lame ducks, and diverting slush-funds to your mates.

The support she should be able to get is affordable premises, affordable staff (oops, don't tell boom boom), available finance from the private sector if and only if she has a good business case, and above all freedom from excessive red tape. Same as any other business, in fact.

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Support doesn't have to mean taxpayers money, it can be a simple as being left alone to get on with the job.

The support she should be able to get is affordable premises, affordable staff (oops, don't tell boom boom), available finance from the private sector if and only if she has a good business case, and above all freedom from excessive red tape. Same as any other business, in fact.

Yes.

Of course financial disincentives on importing finished goods from China might be nice too but would never happen.

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For instance indigenous food and beverage production should be strongly supported, and foreign foodstuffs of indigenous type should be taxed. For instance importing apples from spain, when they can be grown 2 miles down the road in Kent is simply insanely ludicrous. However, non-indigenous food types such as bananas, kiwis, coffee, chocolate etc should not receive any form of tax.

It is more insane than this, we import almost as many potatoes as we export...

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That "buying British" is fairly problematical in actually finding a product that's meaningfully British-made is largely down to the fact that patriotism nowadays is fairly ersatz and focussed on symbolic entities (e.g. football teams) rather than on a deep sense of identity and belonging. This is partly because this kind of sense of identity and belonging is both obstructive to global capital, and partly because since World War 2, serious patriotism is seen as a fairly dubious gateway to blood-and-soil nationalism and things even worse.

So you therefore have companies who simply see "Britishness" as a Union Jack sticker that can be applied when advantageous, but will happily outsource operations to China when other circumstances prove advantageous. If British industry and the UK Government can't take production in the UK seriously, and apply to it some meaning above and beyond the profit margin*, why do they expect consumers to do otherwise?

*no ******** from free-traders about profit being the only reason to be in business, please. The Germans don't see it this way, and are vastly more successful

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  • 201 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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