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Young Jobless Suicidal

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http://uk.news.yahoo.com/21/20100523/tuk-young-jobless-consider-suicide-f858358.html

Northern Ireland statistic, could this be applied to the rest of the UK?

35% felt sucidal

32% felt depressed.

27% felt they had nothing to look forward to in life.

Will such people fight for Injin world like the Thais attempted to do?

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I'm not sure how many get there's something to be angry about, or maybe more importantly a clear cause to fight for/against. From personal experience I'd suggest having an outward focus for anger/blame at the situation would be far less emotionally destructive as being left to assume it's your fault (but at what cost for that mass venting of anger). Certainly the longer it goes on the harder it is to maintain that it's not because you're not good enough/useful enough etc and other thoughts which just add fuel to fire of depressed/suicidal thoughts.

Ian Jeffers, director at The Prince's Trust, said: "The implications of youth unemployment stretch beyond the dole queue and the emotional effects on young people are profound, long-term and can become irreversible."

It's quotes like that that cheer me up no end about being young and unemployed.

Edited by rented

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I'm not sure how many get there's something to be angry about, or maybe more importantly a clear cause to fight for/against. From personal experience I'd suggest having an outward focus for anger/blame at the situation would be far less emotionally destructive as being left to assume it's your fault (but at what cost for that mass venting of anger). Certainly the longer it goes on the harder it is to maintain that it's not because you're not good enough/useful enough etc and other thoughts which just add fuel to fire of depressed/suicidal thoughts.

It's quotes like that that cheer me up no end about being young and unemployed.

I'm sure a fair few here remember the early days of the big bad Thatch ... '1 am a one in 10, a number on a list ... a statistical reminder of a world that doesn't care.' (band called UB40 ...)

I remember something called the Youth Opportunities Programme (Yoppers as they were called were dogsbodies, not proper apprentices), run by the Manpower Services Commission that also ran make-work programmes to soak up graduates doing things like (as I think I recall in Glasgow Uni in the early 80s) writing a biographical dictionary of writers or somesuch. Despite the fact that only about 12% of school leavers went to Uni back then, there were still squads of unemployed grads and a lot of them never really achieved very much on the back of the shit jobs they had to take after uni.

As for the damage being permanent - some of the white trash chavs out there are the kids of the early 80s unemployed and unemployable (many of whose parents began the 80s with jobs but by the early 90s were on the dole like their young offspring), whole families who quickly learned about living off benefits, beating the system by doing work cash in hand, and generally opting out of the world of work.

The 80s revisited ... not the yuppie, big bang 80s but the grim early 80s with no money, no hope, and a plummy-voiced Tory in charge. God help us all.

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I'm sure a fair few here remember the early days of the big bad Thatch ... '1 am a one in 10, a number on a list ... a statistical reminder of a world that doesn't care.' (band called UB40 ...)

I remember something called the Youth Opportunities Programme (Yoppers as they were called were dogsbodies, not proper apprentices), run by the Manpower Services Commission that also ran make-work programmes to soak up graduates doing things like (as I think I recall in Glasgow Uni in the early 80s) writing a biographical dictionary of writers or somesuch. Despite the fact that only about 12% of school leavers went to Uni back then, there were still squads of unemployed grads and a lot of them never really achieved very much on the back of the shit jobs they had to take after uni.

As for the damage being permanent - some of the white trash chavs out there are the kids of the early 80s unemployed and unemployable (many of whose parents began the 80s with jobs but by the early 90s were on the dole like their young offspring), whole families who quickly learned about living off benefits, beating the system by doing work cash in hand, and generally opting out of the world of work.

The 80s revisited ... not the yuppie, big bang 80s but the grim early 80s with no money, no hope, and a plummy-voiced Tory in charge. God help us all.

:( The 1980s was the start of generations on benefits then?

Edited by rented

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http://uk.news.yahoo.com/21/20100523/tuk-young-jobless-consider-suicide-f858358.html

Northern Ireland statistic, could this be applied to the rest of the UK?

35% felt sucidal

32% felt depressed.

27% felt they had nothing to look forward to in life.

Will such people fight for Injin world like the Thais attempted to do?

I think you can apply this to any teenager, regardless of employment, from about 14 to 18.

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Precisely why my other half left NI when she was 18 to get a degree in what she was interested in, despite her parents begging her not to leave and just become a housewife, checkout assistant and simply stop having such silly, lofty ambitions.

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Precisely why my other half left NI when she was 18 to get a degree in what she was interested in, despite her parents begging her not to leave and just become a housewife, checkout assistant and simply stop having such silly, lofty ambitions.

Crabs and Barrels eh? As a crab that escaped, I know exactly what your other half went through. Good for her!

As for the youngsters, 'You've gotta make it happen', 'You've gotta make it happen'. There's a big world out there - believe in yourself!

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Guest sillybear2

Can't these kids just join some kind of club or group? Where was the survey again?

Ohh... :ph34r:

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The 80s revisited ... not the yuppie, big bang 80s but the grim early 80s with no money, no hope, and a plummy-voiced Tory in charge. God help us all.

I do worry that this naive view of the economic situation - distilled down to 'posh Tories and greedy businessmen' - is going be the narrative of the masses this year and next.

Complete ignorance at the situation we are in financially - and about to get worse as UNITE and CWU try to cause as much disruption as possible.

I love this country, but half of me would have liked Gordon to have got in again.

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I'm sure a fair few here remember the early days of the big bad Thatch ... '1 am a one in 10, a number on a list ... a statistical reminder of a world that doesn't care.' (band called UB40 ...)

I remember something called the Youth Opportunities Programme (Yoppers as they were called were dogsbodies, not proper apprentices), run by the Manpower Services Commission that also ran make-work programmes to soak up graduates doing things like (as I think I recall in Glasgow Uni in the early 80s) writing a biographical dictionary of writers or somesuch. Despite the fact that only about 12% of school leavers went to Uni back then, there were still squads of unemployed grads and a lot of them never really achieved very much on the back of the shit jobs they had to take after uni.

As for the damage being permanent - some of the white trash chavs out there are the kids of the early 80s unemployed and unemployable (many of whose parents began the 80s with jobs but by the early 90s were on the dole like their young offspring), whole families who quickly learned about living off benefits, beating the system by doing work cash in hand, and generally opting out of the world of work.

The 80s revisited ... not the yuppie, big bang 80s but the grim early 80s with no money, no hope, and a plummy-voiced Tory in charge. God help us all.

Most people here have no experience of the early 80's. They just think that getting rid of Brown will solve all their problems and get them a house at 50% off 2007 prices. They are in for some very nasty surprises.

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Precisely why my other half left NI when she was 18 to get a degree in what she was interested in, despite her parents begging her not to leave and just become a housewife, checkout assistant and simply stop having such silly, lofty ambitions.

Well, as a teenager growing up in Northern Ireland, I used to get asked to take part in surveys like this, and like today's adolescents, got some fun out of providing misleading rubbish answers. I don't know what your wife's background was, but my very ordinary pals all wanted to be millionaires and professionals. Most of them made it. What's your wife?

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I'm sure a fair few here remember the early days of the big bad Thatch ... '1 am a one in 10, a number on a list ... a statistical reminder of a world that doesn't care.' (band called UB40 ...)

I remember something called the Youth Opportunities Programme (Yoppers as they were called were dogsbodies, not proper apprentices), run by the Manpower Services Commission that also ran make-work programmes to soak up graduates doing things like (as I think I recall in Glasgow Uni in the early 80s) writing a biographical dictionary of writers or somesuch. Despite the fact that only about 12% of school leavers went to Uni back then, there were still squads of unemployed grads and a lot of them never really achieved very much on the back of the shit jobs they had to take after uni.

I remember the Youth Opportunities Programme, I had a young business at the time and used the scheme extensively as a recruitment tool. The Job Centre would send school leavers (not graduates) for an interview, we'd take on the ones that seemed best suited to the assembly work we had and claim back their wages from the MSC. After the allowed time on the scheme we would either let them go, or, if they were good, take them onto permanent staff. I still had half a dozen of them working for me twenty years later, one of them being my works manager.

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There is a sense of despair and foreboding across all generations as we ponder a dark future of lower wages, smaller banks, no more quangoes, no more property ladder proggies on tele, crashing house prices as no one will fell they should stretch their vanishing finances on a bigger hous, hang on.........this a terrible environment for HPI--oh happy days are here again.....!! :lol:

http://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/uk-households-grow-most-pessimistic-about-their-finances-as-cuts-loom-tele-9d8a1bde0e8e.html?x=0

UK households grow most pessimistic about their finances as cuts loom
8:11, Monday 24 May 2010
UK households are more pessimistic about their own finances than at anytime for more than a year, as the Government prepares to deliver radical cuts in spending.
A survey of households showed that 43pc expect their finances to be worse in a year's time, that's the highest amount since April 2009, when the UK remained in the shadow of recession, according to Markit Economics and YouGov (LSE: YOU.L - news) . The survey also showed that 57pc of the households questioned expect the cuts in spending will hurt them.

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http://uk.news.yahoo.com/21/20100523/tuk-young-jobless-consider-suicide-f858358.html

Northern Ireland statistic, could this be applied to the rest of the UK?

35% felt sucidal

32% felt depressed.

27% felt they had nothing to look forward to in life.

Will such people fight for Injin world like the Thais attempted to do?

Its not just the jobless, it is also dispiriting to work your backside off to get a half decent job only to be shafted out of buying your own home by an army of BTL investors and idiot prices, especially when you look around and realise that if you had just got yourself knocked up with you were 16 the Governemnt would give you everything you need and more.

I am getting closer and closer to the point of jacking it all in, I am sure that if you are earning less than ~£35/40K you are better of breeding a pile of kids than bothering to work - even better if you can persuade the fathers to live elsewhere.

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But when the culprit for peoples' anger is gone, the people become unpredictable, like they did in Iraq when Saddam Hussein was toppled. Labour is gone and many of the people with most to be angry about would normally have been Labour supporters.

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As for the damage being permanent - some of the white trash chavs out there are the kids of the early 80s unemployed and unemployable (many of whose parents began the 80s with jobs but by the early 90s were on the dole like their young offspring), whole families who quickly learned about living off benefits, beating the system by doing work cash in hand, and generally opting out of the world of work.

The 80s revisited ... not the yuppie, big bang 80s but the grim early 80s with no money, no hope, and a plummy-voiced Tory in charge. God help us all.

I think its the best option for anyone young in the UK today - live off the house owners profits. Although a boomer myself, I think the boomers should be made to pay for this mess, anyone entering the world today has nothing to gain by support it. Taxpayers are everyone else are paying (QE) to support house prices, why fall into that trap if a life on the dole has more opportunities?

Its not just the jobless, it is also dispiriting to work your backside off to get a half decent job only to be shafted out of buying your own home by an army of BTL investors and idiot prices, especially when you look around and realise that if you had just got yourself knocked up with you were 16 the Governemnt would give you everything you need and more.

I am getting closer and closer to the point of jacking it all in, I am sure that if you are earning less than ~£35/40K you are better of breeding a pile of kids than bothering to work - even better if you can persuade the fathers to live elsewhere.

Jack it in, emigrate. Let the 'Rich' property owners pay your way, The UK should instate a wealth tax as well as increasing capital gains (which should be higher that 50% in my opinion - the government gives and the government is entitled to a share of the profit).

Edited by Peter Hun

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I think you can apply this to any teenager, regardless of employment, from about 14 to 18.

The full, unexpurgated survey reads as follows:-

35% felt suicidal and extremely horny

32% felt depressed and extremely horny

27% had nothing to live for except being extremely horny

6% were too busy masturbating to fill in the survey form

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The 80s revisited ... not the yuppie, big bang 80s but the grim early 80s with no money, no hope, and a plummy-voiced Tory in charge. God help us all.

I remember the eighties well and it feels like we've had more sunshine over the last two days than we had in that whole decade. I prefer the current 'plummies' to the faked plummy of that time but ask me again in a few months time.

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The full, unexpurgated survey reads as follows:-

35% felt suicidal and extremely horny

32% felt depressed and extremely horny

27% had nothing to live for except being extremely horny

6% were too busy masturbating to fill in the survey form

Only 6%? :rolleyes:

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Its not just the jobless, it is also dispiriting to work your backside off to get a half decent job only to be shafted out of buying your own home by an army of BTL investors and idiot prices, especially when you look around and realise that if you had just got yourself knocked up with you were 16 the Governemnt would give you everything you need and more.

I am getting closer and closer to the point of jacking it all in, I am sure that if you are earning less than ~£35/40K you are better of breeding a pile of kids than bothering to work - even better if you can persuade the fathers to live elsewhere.

+1

I know quite a few people who when they were 16-18 knocked up their girlfriends which stopped them continuing their education and got them working. Most if not all bought some form of house/flat, usually a new build 1 bed flat, which was still possible on a school leavers wage (~15k wasn't too hard to get with reasonable GCSEs/A-levels/BTEC) back in 1999 in some of the cheaper parts of Oxfordshire.

They're a lot more comfortable than I am now even though I went to university got a 'good' job and earn 50+% more than them now.

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Well, as a teenager growing up in Northern Ireland, I used to get asked to take part in surveys like this, and like today's adolescents, got some fun out of providing misleading rubbish answers. I don't know what your wife's background was, but my very ordinary pals all wanted to be millionaires and professionals. Most of them made it. What's your wife?

Certainly a professional but not a millionaire unfortunately! Forgive me if I was generalising, but her experience was one of little opportunity in semi rural NI in her chosen field, & was actively discouraged by her folks from going to uni. Luckily her ambition saw her better her situation or she may well have ended up in one of the three categories listed by the OP.

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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