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David Cameron's 500 Day Programme To Change Britain

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Torygraph scoop

whats on the chop, shape of things to come (what to expect= not much)

isn't he another Blair (Private Eye)

sugar coated with empty words like “freedom, fairness and responsibility” , lovely.

Queen's speech revealed: David Cameron's 500 day programme to change Britain

David Cameron's 500-day programme for turning Britain into a “strong and fair society” can be disclosed by The Sunday Telegraph.

By Patrick Hennessy, Political Editor

A late draft of the Queen’s Speech, obtained by this newspaper, reveals that the Government will spell out an ambitious programme of at least 21 Bills to be introduced in the next 18 months.

Within days, the coalition Government intends to bring in key school reforms and scrap plans for ID cards.

A radical programme of political reform will get under way in the following weeks.

The speech has “freedom, fairness and responsibility” as its main themes and contains many key policies demanded by the Liberal Democrats as the price for their entry into the coalition government.

The measures to be announced within weeks could include a Parliamentary Reform Bill as well as Nick Clegg’s long-cherished “Great Repeals Bill”, containing measures which he has said would represent the biggest constitutional shake-up in 200 years. These plans are likely to alarm many Tory MPs and activists.

Five of the Bills will be led by the Treasury under George Osborne, reaffirming the Tory Chancellor’s primacy over Vince Cable, the Lib-Dem Business Secretary, whose department is almost absent from the draft list.

Mr Osborne and David Laws, his Lib Dem deputy at the Treasury, will tomorrow announce details of £6 billion in “emergency” savings in government spending to be made this year — including £513 million from cutting funding to quangos.

The draft of the Queen’s Speech viewed by The Sunday Telegraph will see the monarch declaring at Tuesday’s State Opening of Parliament that the Government’s first priority will be to “reduce the deficit and restore economic growth” and to “accelerate the reduction of the structural budget deficit”. The Queen is expected to go on to outline Government plans to make tax and benefits “fairer and simpler” while adding, in an echo of Tory pre-election warnings against Labour’s “jobs tax”, that “National Insurance contributions should not be a hindrance to employment”.

In a reference to the Tories’ “Big Society” plan, the draft has the Queen saying: “My Government will seek to build a strong and fair society by reforming public services and encouraging individual and social responsibility.”

The list of Bills sets out a precise and packed timetable.

The first Bill to be published will be an Academies Bill, allowing more schools to become academies – enshrining the new administration’s commitment to education reform, a key policy for Mr Cameron and his inner circle.

A Bill scrapping planned local government changes in Exeter and Norwich will follow in days, as will a highly symbolic measure of the break from the Labour era — the tearing up of plans for identity cards, something demanded both by the Tories and Lib Dems.

The weeks before Parliament breaks for its summer recess — which is likely to be in late July — will see, in addition to the emergency Budget on June 22, the publication of Bills largely concerned with halting Labour tax plans and dealing with the budget deficit.

The parliamentary Bill is likely to include proposals for fixed-term parliaments and to give voters the right to “recall” misbehaving MPs.

It could also be the vehicle used to pave the way for a referendum on changing the voting system in general elections to the multi-choice alternative vote method, the chief prize obtained by the Lib Dems in coalition talks.

The 12 months following the summer recess will see the Government get down to the business of reforming the state and public services – including two Bills from Iain Duncan Smith’s Work and Pensions Department, one of which will embody wholesale benefits changes.

A Health Bill will aim to reduce health inequalities. These can be chalked up as “wins” for the Tories.

Michael Gove, the Education Secretary, is expected to get a second Bill – which could be the vehicle for his ambitious Swedish-style “free schools” plan to increase the number of state education providers to groups including parents.

The draft Queen’s Speech also lists an Energy Security and Green Economy Bill, pleasing Lib Dems, and a Police Reform and Social Responsibility Bill, likely to win Tory favour.

However, there is no mention in the documents seen by this newspaper of a free parliamentary vote to repeal Labour’s ban on hunting with dogs – an issue that has been a key demand of Tory activists.

The draft text for the Queen’s Speech has her announcing reforms that will “restore trust in democratic institutions and rebalance the relationship between the citizen and the state”, while “legislation will be brought forward to restore freedoms and civil liberties”.

Euro-sceptics are likely to be reassured to hear that there will be a Bill published after the summer recess to ensure that “in future this parliament and the British people have their say on any proposed transfer of powers to the European Union”.

On foreign policy, the Government will seek “a two-state solution [in Israel/Palestine]”, “lasting security and stability in Afghanistan” and “an enhanced partnership with Pakistan and India”. It will also address “serious international concerns posed by Iran’s nuclear programme”.

Mr Osborne will tomorrow spell out the £513 million of savings to be made from stopping government funding to various quangos, as a key plank of the £6 billion cutbacks to be made this year.

Reports this weekend also suggested that another £900 million alone in savings would be made by Mr Cable’s Business Innovation and Skills department, while a further £200 million could come from university funding.

Other Whitehall savings will be made through cutting consultancy and travel costs; cutbacks on government orders; a reduction in property costs; scaling back or cancelling wasteful IT projects and restricting recruitment.

It is understood that over the past seven days the Treasury has identified “endemic” waste across Whitehall — including yearly government spending of £125 million on taxis; £320 million on hotels; £70 million on flights; £3 billion overall on travel; £580 million on office furniture and £1 billion on advertising.

Individual programmes identified include dance classes promoted by the Department of Health at a cost of £275,000, while in the Nigerian capital of Abuja there are four different Government HQs costing an “extra” £20 million.

After the emergency Budget, ministers and officials will prepare for a full-scale spending review in the autumn that will set out departmental budgets and is likely to be “eye-wateringly tight”.

Ministers need to come up with a credible debt reduction plan to reassure the money markets and help Britain keep its prized AAA credit-rating, as well as promoting measures that help people back to work.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/david-cameron/7753829/Queens-speech-revealed-David-Camerons-500-day-programme-to-change-Britain.html

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Pah - 500 days. Obama onloy took 100 days not to do anything. I bet I could do nothing in even less time than that.

DC Is rubbish.

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500 days of austerity = 500 days of house price falls.

Actually 500 days to start turning the country in the direction of austerity. Then 8 years reducing the budget deficit (debt still growing meanwhile), then 1 or 2 decades to reduce this debt. So, some 2 or 3 decades of austerity.

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Actually 500 days to start turning the country in the direction of austerity. Then 8 years reducing the budget deficit (debt still growing meanwhile), then 1 or 2 decades to reduce this debt. So, some 2 or 3 decades of austerity.

There could be a long period of auaterity and decline but Camerons plan is for a 'short sharp shock' to the UK economy to do 180 degree turn in a couple of years. He hopes that the billions he is going to take out of the public sector will be replaced by private sector growth starting 2 years out. If he is right, real growth could start then but whatever, there will certainly be 2 years of things getting worse (better if you want to buy a house), before they get better (worse if you want to buy a house).

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There could be a long period of auaterity and decline but Camerons plan is for a 'short sharp shock' to the UK economy to do 180 degree turn in a couple of years. He hopes that the billions he is going to take out of the public sector will be replaced by private sector growth starting 2 years out. If he is right, real growth could start then but whatever, there will certainly be 2 years of things getting worse (better if you want to buy a house), before they get better (worse if you want to buy a house).

ain't going to happen (any growth I mean).

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Queen's speech leak reveals coalition government legislative plans

Ministers to investigate how draft of address was leaked to newspapers, revealing plans for bills on education and policing

guardian.co.uk, Sunday 23 May 2010 12.01 BST

The new coalition government formed by David Cameron and Nick Clegg was poised to launch a major leak inquiry after a draft of the Queen's speech to be delivered on Tuesday was published in Sunday newspapers.

The unprecendented breach of Whitehall security and protocol is particularly embarrassing as the leaked information contained not only a list of bills to be unveiled to parliament, but also a version of what the Queen was due to say at Tuesday's state opening of parliament.

The leak of the speech was condemned by the shadow leader of the Commons, Rosie Winterton, who said that she would be calling on the government to explain what had happened.

"If it is right that details of the Queen's speech have been given to Sunday newspapers before it has been submitted to parliament, the new government will have to explain to parliament their apparent attitude of disregard," she said.

"I will be calling on the leader of the House of Commons to explain the situation in parliament and investigate it fully."

A Downing Street spokesman said: "The Queen's speech is a highly significant part of the country's parliamentary process. We are disappointed that a draft of Her Majesty's speech has been published in this way."

There are suspicions that details of the speech could have been relayed to the press by aggrieved Tories or Liberal Democrats unhappy at the formation of the coalition, or by discontented civil servants.

The leaked draft confirmed that key school reforms and the scrapping of identity cards would be brought in within days. These measures would be followed by a programme of political reform including a parliamentary reform bill that would take in measures to provide for fixed-term parliaments and a bill for a referendum on voting reform for Westminster elections.

Most embarrassingly, however, the draft contained the words that had been prepared for the Queen to deliver to parliament, normally the most closely guarded secret between a government and Buckingham Palace.

The Queen was due to say that "freedom, fairness and responsibility" would be at the heart of the legislative programme with a "great repeal bill" prominent, to ditch Labour legislation opposed before the election by Tories and the Lib Dems.

The Queen would have said that the government's priority is to "reduce the deficit and restore economic growth" and to "accelerate the reduction of the structural budget deficit", with five bills led by the Treasury.

The first bill to be published, according to the leak, will be an academies bill, enabling more schools to become academies – one of the central planks of the Conservatives' election manifesto. The speech will also include a police reform bill that will prove highly controversial with police leaders across the country.

Writing in the News of the World, Cameron confirmed the first piece of legislation will be the education and children's bill.

He said the bill will increase freedoms for academies, allow schools more say in setting the curriculum and give parents the power to take over failing schools.

"Too many of the poorest children are stuck in chaotic classrooms in bad schools. So we'll give teachers more power over discipline and bring in a pupil premium – extra funding for the poorest children so they go to the best schools, not the worst," he wrote.

In a letter to the Observer, police authority leaders and senior officers warn today that the new government's plans for sweeping reform of the service will make the country's streets less safe.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/may/23/queens-speech-leak-coalition-plans

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thats nice, no pain to ordinary people.

Chancellor to reveal spending cuts

Chancellor George Osborne is poised to announce details of the new coalition Government's first £6 billion of public spending cuts to be made this year.

Mr Osborne and his Liberal Democrat Treasury Chief Secretary David Laws have said that the "great majority" of the savings will be used to start paying down Britain's record £156 billion deficit.

Press reports over the weekend suggested that £513 million of savings will come from a "bonfire of the quangos" - with organisations like the Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency set for the axe.

Vince Cable's Department for Business, Innovation and Skills looks set to be one of the big losers, with reported savings of £900 million, while a further £200 million could come from university funding.

It is reported that the Treasury has identified further savings from Whitehall's annual £3 billion travel bill - including £125 million on taxis, £320 million on hotels and £70 million on flights.

Further savings could come from the £1 billion spent on government advertising and the £580 million budget for office furniture.

Consultancy and property costs will also come under attack, recruitment restricted and IT projects scaled back or cancelled.

Individual projects to be hit could include an £8 million refurbishment grant for the Blackpool Tower agreed in the final days of the Labour government.

The Treasury is also expected to be looking to make savings from the Government's overseas properties, such as rationalising the four separate offices in the Nigerian capital Abuja occupied by the high commission, the Border Agency, the Department for International Development and the British Council.

Chancellor George Osborne is poised to announce details of the new coalition Government's first £6 billion of public spending cuts to be made this year.

Mr Osborne and his Liberal Democrat Treasury Chief Secretary David Laws have said that the "great majority" of the savings will be used to start paying down Britain's record £156 billion deficit.

Press reports over the weekend suggested that £513 million of savings will come from a "bonfire of the quangos" - with organisations like the Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency set for the axe.

Vince Cable's Department for Business, Innovation and Skills looks set to be one of the big losers, with reported savings of £900 million, while a further £200 million could come from university funding.

It is reported that the Treasury has identified further savings from Whitehall's annual £3 billion travel bill - including £125 million on taxis, £320 million on hotels and £70 million on flights.

Further savings could come from the £1 billion spent on government advertising and the £580 million budget for office furniture.

Consultancy and property costs will also come under attack, recruitment restricted and IT projects scaled back or cancelled.

Individual projects to be hit could include an £8 million refurbishment grant for the Blackpool Tower agreed in the final days of the Labour government.

The Treasury is also expected to be looking to make savings from the Government's overseas properties, such as rationalising the four separate offices in the Nigerian capital Abuja occupied by the high commission, the Border Agency, the Department for International Development and the British Council.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/feedarticle/9092047

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There could be a long period of auaterity and decline but Camerons plan is for a 'short sharp shock' to the UK economy to do 180 degree turn in a couple of years. He hopes that the billions he is going to take out of the public sector will be replaced by private sector growth starting 2 years out. If he is right, real growth could start then but whatever, there will certainly be 2 years of things getting worse (better if you want to buy a house), before they get better (worse if you want to buy a house).

4 years, is the planned time to reduce the annual budget deficit by more than 50%. Hence, the deficit will get smaller each year. The tightening will get tighter each year. You are being too optimistic timing-wise.

Look, the country spent the last 10 years over-indulging in debt. From top to bottom. Hairdressers were buying new BMWs, and people on benefits were holidaying abroad. Even worse, the middle classes and boomers were MEWing like there is no tomorrow. And worst still, the government was runing a deficit, and increasing the national debt, even during the boom years.

Everything we spent beyond our means in the last 10 years of partying will have to be paid back from now onwards, and with interests, literally (5%aa).

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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Why all this fear of austerity....how would it change things? would we starve? would we be put on the streets? would we freeze and die?

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Why all this fear of austerity....how would it change things? would we starve? would we be put on the streets? would we freeze and die?

woukld we be able to get 4x4s on the tick and a couple of BTLs?

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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