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300,000 Job Loss...here Comes "da Pain"

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Looks like a few carriages are about to be de-coupled from the gravy train. Is that a second home/holiday cottage around you neck, or a dead weight that's going to drag you under twice as fast?

Peep! Peep! Next stop shitsville.

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Looks like a few carriages are about to be de-coupled from the gravy train. Is that a second home/holiday cottage around you neck, or a dead weight that's going to drag you under twice as fast?

Peep! Peep! Next stop shitsville.

Its amazing how many people tied to New Labour in some way, from brothers and sisters to lovers to friends are in gravy train jobs. I'm sure they are scrambling to get protection in the new regime to keep their coordinator of community engagement job on £75k a year with full benefits and early retirement.

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Lord Jones (name from memory) stated at a Parliamentary Select committee that the civil service could be cut by half, and it would still function the same.

I believe he had some years experience working in the CS.

Then there's all the pensions to find. This is all way beyond what the country can afford. Where will it end?

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WE hear a MASSIVE postion to SHORT the £ has been taken out............We see.

"DC" Will need to show the people WHY he got to sack them........so i expect "Something Big" very soon.

Its Bloody good news anyway

;)

Unless your a 3 series driving "Useless Gov Job" type!

;)

Mike

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Its amazing how many people tied to New Labour in some way, from brothers and sisters to lovers to friends are in gravy train jobs. I'm sure they are scrambling to get protection in the new regime to keep their coordinator of community engagement job on £75k a year with full benefits and early retirement.

Was at a family do a few months back , looking around i did a quick mental note of who the people there worked for . Not so much high paid non jobs , but so many of them worked in the state sector, NHS, Schools, Councils, Civil Service ect they far out numbered those in the private sector.

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There are over 50% or some 6 million people on the government payroll.

They need to reduce the workforce by at least half!

but they're breaking bad news gently, 500,000 then it reads 700,000 soon it would be in millions.

There is no £££ left.

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Was at a family do a few months back , looking around i did a quick mental note of who the people there worked for . Not so much high paid non jobs , but so many of them worked in the state sector, NHS, Schools, Councils, Civil Service ect they far out numbered those in the private sector.

out of my immediate family of 10, I have 2 fireman, 1 teacher, 1 in JCP, 1 retired teacher, 1 policeman, 2 in local government and 2 of us who work in the private sector. Of the 2 of us one of us works for a supermarket.

None of my family can see how this isn't sustainable....................They all pay taxes you see :blink:

Edited by Godley

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out of my immediate family of 10, I have 2 fireman, 1 teacher, 1 in JCP, 1 retired teacher, 1 policeman, 2 in local government and 2 of us who work in the private sector. Of the 2 of us one of us works for a supermarket.

...

In what area of the country do you live? Is it one of the NuLab Sovietised bits where >50% of the workforce work for the govt? (not that shifting govt jobs out of expensive London and the SE to cheaper bits of the UK isn't a good idea)

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out of my immediate family of 10, I have 2 fireman, 1 teacher, 1 in JCP, 1 retired teacher, 1 policeman, 2 in local government and 2 of us who work in the private sector. Of the 2 of us one of us works for a supermarket.

None of my family can see how this isn't sustainable....................They all pay taxes you see :blink:

lol,

They live in another world ...............................

You say 1 retired teacher , I have an aunt she took early retirement form teaching on a pay off and full pension . That was 26 years ago and has been getting an index linked pension ever since . Plus 21 years on the state pension and half the pension her husband left 20 years ago. He never got any pension himself died just before retirement ,

IM not saying this is not fair as those pensions were agreed as part of salary package's , but where is the money coming from ? She has daughters , grand children great grand children and now even a great great grandchild, all these next generations are not going to be able to pay for these pensions and put something away for themselves at the same time. Especially if they do not have jobs.

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Guest absolutezero

Was at a family do a few months back , looking around i did a quick mental note of who the people there worked for . Not so much high paid non jobs , but so many of them worked in the state sector, NHS, Schools, Councils, Civil Service ect they far out numbered those in the private sector.

And why do you think that might be?

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There are over 50% or some 6 million people on the government payroll.

They need to reduce the workforce by at least half!

but they're breaking bad news gently, 500,000 then it reads 700,000 soon it would be in millions.

There is no £££ left.

Well, it's cheaper to pay benefits than wages.

In the first part of 2010 there were:

2.51 million unemployed (of whom 1.52 million were claiming JSA) - that's unemployed, mind you - economically inactive is another 8.17 million.

1.07 million working part-time because they can't get full-time work

So what are the totals if you add 1 million, 2 million and 3 million from the public sector losing their jobs?

1 million: 12.75 million not working full time, the vast majority not working at all

2 million: 13.75 million ditto

3 mllion: 14.75 million ditto

The estimated working age population is 38,068,000.

And before anyone says "They'll get jobs in the private sector", I'd like to know where. In the first quarter of 2010, there were 475,000 vacancies notified. Of course, there are always vacancies that aren't notified to Jobcentres, but then at Jobcentres jobs are often double counted.

Can someone explain In what way the money being saved from wages in the public sector is going to create jobs in the private sector? If the answer is "Actually, it's not going to", then we reach the situation above.

The expansion of the public sector has hidden, to some extent, the effect of automation and globalisation on jobs in the UK. We are about to get a more realistic view of the situation.

We are in for some terribly interesting times.

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Well, it's cheaper to pay benefits than wages.

In the first part of 2010 there were:

2.51 million unemployed (of whom 1.52 million were claiming JSA) - that's unemployed, mind you - economically inactive is another 8.17 million.

1.07 million working part-time because they can't get full-time work

So what are the totals if you add 1 million, 2 million and 3 million from the public sector losing their jobs?

1 million: 12.75 million not working full time, the vast majority not working at all

2 million: 13.75 million ditto

3 mllion: 14.75 million ditto

The estimated working age population is 38,068,000.

And before anyone says "They'll get jobs in the private sector", I'd like to know where. In the first quarter of 2010, there were 475,000 vacancies notified. Of course, there are always vacancies that aren't notified to Jobcentres, but then at Jobcentres jobs are often double counted.

Can someone explain In what way the money being saved from wages in the public sector is going to create jobs in the private sector? If the answer is "Actually, it's not going to", then we reach the situation above.

The expansion of the public sector has hidden, to some extent, the effect of automation and globalisation on jobs in the UK. We are about to get a more realistic view of the situation.

We are in for some terribly interesting times.

For every job lost in the public sector over the coming years you can probably add another 1 or 2 lost in the private sector as the bankruptcy/business insolvency bull market takes off to the moon in phase 2, these public employees were still spending money in the private sector, even if the money has only been borrowed by the govt

Edited by Tamara De Lempicka

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And before anyone says "They'll get jobs in the private sector", I'd like to know where.

Once the government pulls their perma-bull* view on labour prices, all manner of magic happens.

The challenge isn't jobs, the challenge is finding people to work for lower unit-hour yields than those required (by the price-setting behaviour of their state employed, rent-seeking brethren) to live, and still eat.

Remove the artificial market (kill off the 75%-or-thereabouts of common "equity" - as in, job-share of national employment - "owned" by the market maker) and there's some hope that this shrivelled prune of an economy just might reconstitute.

(* I suspect this is why Taleb says that Cameron gets it, but that's just a wild guess)

Edited by ParticleMan

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I haven't turned the TV on yet this morning but have had the radio on since about 6AM and the talk is very bearish about job cuts to be announced in the coming weeks.

Seems as if the penny is hitting home at last - now that is a mixed metaphor!

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Guest absolutezero

For every job lost in the public sector over the coming years you can probably add another 1 or 2 lost in the private sector as the bankruptcy/business insolvency bull market takes off to the moon in phase 2, these public employees were still spending money in the private sector, even if the money has only been borrowed by the govt

You see that.

I see that.

A lot on here are blind.

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Guest absolutezero

WHAT ?

but so many of them worked in the state sector, NHS, Schools, Councils, Civil Service ect they far out numbered those in the private sector.

That.

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Guest absolutezero

Because some people prefer to work in the quilted comfort of the state where Nanny takes care of everything.

Nope.

Try again.

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You see that.

I see that.

A lot on here are blind.

I agree with you. The reason that private sector jobs do not exist in abundance is that income requirements to sustain current asset price levels are too high relative to the economic value of production.

The only solution is for asset prices to fall enough that people can afford to live on the lower incomes that are sustainable from the value that our economy generates. Housing costs are the major contributor to this problem.

When the balance between asset prices and the value of production is restored, jobs will be created again.

The free market tried to restore this balance about a year ago. Governments globally tried to prevent the balance from being restored.

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You see that.

I see that.

A lot on here are blind.

Absolutely right. All I can see is more unemployment with all the social and financial costs thst spring from that.

Cuts are digging a bigger hole when we should be looking for growth.

And standing at the edge of the hole, sniggering, are a new elite

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/article7133842.ece

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I agree with you. The reason that private sector jobs do not exist in abundance is that income requirements to sustain current asset price levels are too high relative to the economic value of production.

The only solution is for asset prices to fall enough that people can afford to live on the lower incomes that are sustainable from the value that our economy generates. Housing costs are the major contributor to this problem.

When the balance between asset prices and the value of production is restored, jobs will be created again.

if you're just talking about house prices, then the practical market value of them - if you rent - and therefore the cost of living - is much lower than estate agents' valuations would suggest. To put it another way - we don't have an asset shortage wrt living arrangements (OK imported commodities are another issue)

or do you mean some other asset prices?

Edited by Si1

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  • 145 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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