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southmartin

Best Places To Live In The Us

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So, imagine you had visas sorted, and could run your business from anywhere - where in the US would you choose to live?

I'd be thinking California, not LA (far too urban) maybe an hour north of there on the coast - somewhere with low crime rate, good schools and plenty of outdoor space.

Come on, hypothetically - where would you go?

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So, imagine you had visas sorted, and could run your business from anywhere - where in the US would you choose to live?

I'd be thinking California, not LA (far too urban) maybe an hour north of there on the coast - somewhere with low crime rate, good schools and plenty of outdoor space.

Come on, hypothetically - where would you go?

California is bust. Shame, 'cos I thought San Francisco looked like a nice place, as big cities go. If west coast, further north has more attraction: what I hear about Oregon sounds good.

Only other US place I've seen and liked was Boston. But with their history, a Brit would want a thick skin to live there.

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So, imagine you had visas sorted, and could run your business from anywhere - where in the US would you choose to live?

I'd be thinking California, not LA (far too urban) maybe an hour north of there on the coast - somewhere with low crime rate, good schools and plenty of outdoor space.

Come on, hypothetically - where would you go?

You appear to state that:

-Money is no object

-You have children who need education

If you can plonk them in private boarding etc, then multiple homes for multiple seasons would fit your bill. e.g Many of the fortune 500 CEOs would keep a place in the Rockies, Manhattan, Long Island, and somewhere like Naples FL.

If you are looking for one, and only one, place, then I would post on a US forum (alt.america might be a start) querying where has:

1) The best tax rates

2) The best x, y, & z, where x,y, & z are the things you like in life. e.g. Outdoor pursuits, natural beauty, etc.

You may also like to look at some of the less populated states down the middle, the prarie states etc. They are more remote, but potentialy more self-sufficient and removed from civil commotion if everything goes TU. Good night John-boy and all that.

Personally, I like the dry heat that exists in Nevada, the greenery of Vermont, the watersports and seafood of the Florida gulf coast, the skiing in Colorado. It really would be hard to choose just one place.

I'm sure that California has a lot to offer, but they do seem to have their fair share of problems.

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So, imagine you had visas sorted, and could run your business from anywhere - where in the US would you choose to live?

I'd be thinking California, not LA (far too urban) maybe an hour north of there on the coast - somewhere with low crime rate, good schools and plenty of outdoor space.

Come on, hypothetically - where would you go?

I'd go for somewhere a bit out of the way, but not too much, in New England. Augusta in Maine is lovely for example. It's cold in winter but it's easy to get to from the UK via Boston and the cultural gap isn't so wide that it's painful. Also housing is cheap. You could swap a 1 bed flat in East London for this for example:

http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/79-Parkwood-Dr_Augusta_ME_04330_1112620674

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Some friends lived all over US, but loved it most in Colorado, 300 days of crystal clear skies, skiing, low humidity, lots of trails.

Obviously because there are a lot of Evangeligal organisations HQed in Colorado Springs, the BBC would have you believe its on a par with Afganistan for liberal values, but apparently its actually full of californians fed up with the fumes, traffic, mexicans and cost of california - i believe even weed is legal in Denver.

Personally i like wide open spaces, so most places in america would suit me better than the UK.

Humidity in the deep south may get a bit tiresome i suppose, and snow in the midwest.

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Almost heaven, West Virginia.

Fantatstic, and the Smokies as well. Just like England but with a tiny fraction of its current population.

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Have lived in San Diego and Chicago. Both amazing. However that was as a who gives a ****** no worries in the World young traveller so a bit different from upping sticks and moving over there as a proper grown up.

The Rockies would be immense if you like the snow/skiing/boarding etc..

Depends on what work you do as well.

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Guest absolutezero

I'd go for somewhere a bit out of the way, but not too much, in New England. Augusta in Maine is lovely for example. It's cold in winter but it's easy to get to from the UK via Boston and the cultural gap isn't so wide that it's painful. Also housing is cheap. You could swap a 1 bed flat in East London for this for example:

http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/79-Parkwood-Dr_Augusta_ME_04330_1112620674

Just goes to show how much the British economy is geared to house prices.:(

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Some friends lived all over US, but loved it most in Colorado, 300 days of crystal clear skies, skiing, low humidity, lots of trails.

Obviously because there are a lot of Evangeligal organisations HQed in Colorado Springs, the BBC would have you believe its on a par with Afganistan for liberal values, but apparently its actually full of californians fed up with the fumes, traffic, mexicans and cost of california - i believe even weed is legal in Denver.

Personally i like wide open spaces, so most places in america would suit me better than the UK.

Humidity in the deep south may get a bit tiresome i suppose, and snow in the midwest.

I doubt that very much.

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I doubt that very much.

wiki

In 2005, Denver became the first major city in the U.S. to make the possession of less than an ounce of marijuana legal for adults 21 and older. The city voted 53.49%-46.51% in favor of the marijuana legalization measure.

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Guest absolutezero

I doubt that very much.

I don't. Have you seen the murals at Denver Airport?

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I would choose the US for the spaces.

Pacific Grove, California. Not materialistic and it is a 'dry' town, although staggering distance from a wet one, ready access to all of California's natural wonders.

The Four Corners area is a great outdoors playground all year round.

Places to avoid due to climate (heat + humidity) and fire ants = Southeastern states

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San Francisco, beautiful, you can walk everywhere, not too fast paced, fantastic art and club scene, great people, beach, the beauties of the coast in either direction, fantastic food.

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I'd be thinking California, not LA (far too urban) maybe an hour north of there on the coast - somewhere with low crime rate, good schools and plenty of outdoor space.

You could do worse than Santa Barbara or San Luis Obispo, but you'd really have to mean it about money being no object, and bush fires are a constant hazard.

I'd definitely think about Portland (OR, not ME): it's got the scenery, culture and low crime rate but not the extreme heat and it's significantly cheaper to live there than in the better parts of CA.

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San Francisco, beautiful, you can walk everywhere, not too fast paced, fantastic art and club scene, great people, beach, the beauties of the coast in either direction, fantastic food.

Yeah, in terms of its setting it's a 'merkin answer to beautifully-situated European cities like Stockholm or Salzburg, and they seem to have a lively culture with it.

But aren't they suffering from California being bust?

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Guest X-QUORK

So, imagine you had visas sorted, and could run your business from anywhere - where in the US would you choose to live?

I'd be thinking California, not LA (far too urban) maybe an hour north of there on the coast - somewhere with low crime rate, good schools and plenty of outdoor space.

Come on, hypothetically - where would you go?

You've just hit the nail on the head with Northern California or possibly Oregon. The San Fancisco area would be worth considering too, from what I understand it's a much more liberal city than the redneck backwaters of much of the US.

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Guest X-QUORK

I don't. Have you seen the murals at Denver Airport?

Oh FFS. Serious TFH mentalness.

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any college town pretty much - Santa Barbara, Boulder, Raleigh, etc etc

All the culture of a town much larger, but with less crime, more laid-back residents, less car reliance so more of a city centre (I went to albuquerque - 500,000 people - and it's central shopping district was smaller than Hawick's)

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If money really were no object...

Upper East Side of Manhattan between 59th and 110th next to park.

Sorry, re-read my post, am not an oligarch, so we're not talking millions (well not sterling anyway!) but a decent chunk, plus a good ongoing business that's location independent.... So Upper East side's not gonna happen! Besides, I want space - low crime, and friendly people

Glad to see so many votes for North Cal / Oregon - and also Maine on East coast. Always liked the look of New Hampshire, but that maybe just because I liked the look of Jed Bartletts ranch...

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I'd go for somewhere a bit out of the way, but not too much, in New England. Augusta in Maine is lovely for example.

New England would be my first choice (well, guess really as I'm only going on what I think it's like).

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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