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Toto deVeer

Physics As Hobby...recommended Forums/resources?

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One of my hobbies is dabbling in physics and maths (I know I need to get a life).

I've come across a paper on the Dirac delta function being used somewhat like a Jacobian for transformations (with some apparent advantages, especially for probability transformations)....

From the physics folks on the board, are there any good, active physics or maths forums out there (or other self help resources)?

Any suggestions?

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

Schrodinger says, "Maybe."

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Thx ;)

Without hijacking are there any good books/ways/methods to become better at maths?

Like kind of math mnemonics? Would some sort of visualisation help mathematical dyslexia?

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Without hijacking are there any good books/ways/methods to become better at maths?

Like kind of math mnemonics? Would some sort of visualisation help mathematical dyslexia?

Maths is a big subject. What do you want to improve at specifically?

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One of my hobbies is dabbling in physics and maths (I know I need to get a life).

I've come across a paper on the Dirac delta function being used somewhat like a Jacobian for transformations (with some apparent advantages, especially for probability transformations)....

From the physics folks on the board, are there any good, active physics or maths forums out there (or other self help resources)?

Any suggestions?

Try http://www.physics.org/ for a starter.

Try the American Institute too.

There are several bulletin boards. I think Scientific American have one which is well used.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

Thx ;)

Have you got Richard Feyman's Lectures on Physics?

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Have you got Richard Feyman's Lectures on Physics?

That might have been my suggestion but the OP seems to be some distance into the field so possibly has a previous grounding (or alternatively is horribly out of his depth!). But I do echo your sentiment, if you are fairly new - books are a must. If you are well grounded then the forums are the better approach but you have to be very aware that the sorts of people with the answer may well not give you exactly what you want so you need to be prepared to interpret!

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Guest anorthosite

Schrodinger says, "Maybe."

Heisenberg says "I know for sure there is one, but I've no idea where it is".

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Maths is a big subject. What do you want to improve at specifically?

The most common phrase I hear people who aren't good at Math say is "getting my head round it". I see from your sig you are probably a Software Engineer? From that perspective, solving algorithms quickly. How would one approach this and improve it? Can you improve raw intelligence or are you destined to be stuck with your IQ?

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Have you considered doing an Open University course?

There are stand-alone modules at levels 1,2 and 3 in both maths and physics, and other universities, like the University of Manchester, do distance learning courses in these areas too.

http://www.open.ac.uk

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Have you considered doing an Open University course?

There are stand-alone modules at levels 1,2 and 3 in both maths and physics, and other universities, like the University of Manchester, do distance learning courses in these areas too.

http://www.open.ac.uk

+1 on this. I've started studying Maths with the OU this year, and it's fantastic.

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That might have been my suggestion but the OP seems to be some distance into the field so possibly has a previous grounding (or alternatively is horribly out of his depth!). But I do echo your sentiment, if you are fairly new - books are a must. If you are well grounded then the forums are the better approach but you have to be very aware that the sorts of people with the answer may well not give you exactly what you want so you need to be prepared to interpret!

I'm not really that far in to the subject, and I'm sure that Feynman's lectures would be challenging. I've been reading some of Einstein's stuff and on another thread 'What is Gravity' found the feedback extremely useful and very interesting. But these subjects, in both physics and mathematics terms, are absolutely vast in scope.

I'm doing a fair amount of work with probability which requires transformation of discrete to continuous distributions. I came across an interesting paper on the application of the Dirac delta method to this rather than a Jacobian that does not require a one-to-one correspondence to transform multivariate relationships. But the paper is written by a chap from Asia and I've had trouble following it. I've actually had to go to the library to get Dirac's famous work, 'Principles of Quantum Mechanics'. Wow! Amazing stuff! I'm also framing some problems with Cantor's set theory and Kolmogorov's Axioms to identify measures on a particle problem that I'm working on. I never studied this stuff in school so I'm having to learn it at home, and it's kinda hard to work with this stuff in isolation.

I tried to get some help from the local University only to discover that the math department is split in two, one for deterministic maths and the other for probabilistic maths, and the two don't really work much together. I understand that this was one of Einstein's strengths in that he used to work from one back to the other to solve problems, particulary for his work on diffusion.

Edit: spelling.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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