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Bbc Seems Positively Chuffed That Nanny State Remains

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National identity cards may have been scrapped, but that doesn't mean you don't need to carry other forms of ID. So there....The whole climate surrounding proof of age has changed in the last few years, says Mark Hastings of the Beer and Pub Association, which represents two-thirds of pubs in the UK. But awareness of the new rules is very high, he says."A recent survey showed 90% of 18- to 21-year-olds knew about Challenge 21 and have experienced a much more rigorous approach to ID checks.snipWe are moving towards the US culture, often commented on, where it's absolutely common to be asked for ID wherever you go, says Mr Hastings. If you're 21 or under, you should expect to be asked for ID, therefore carry some. (I have never been asked to show ID in the states, except at immigration)Others have had a similar experience. Headlines were made when a 72-year-old was unable to buy two bottles of Cabernet Sauvignon at Morrisons in Blackpool because he could not prove his age.http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/8693997.stmMr. Clegg.... I hope that fantastic speech of yours wasn't all form and no content!

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National identity cards may have been scrapped, but that doesn't mean you don't need to carry other forms of ID. So there....The whole climate surrounding proof of age has changed in the last few years, says Mark Hastings of the Beer and Pub Association, which represents two-thirds of pubs in the UK. But awareness of the new rules is very high, he says."A recent survey showed 90% of 18- to 21-year-olds knew about Challenge 21 and have experienced a much more rigorous approach to ID checks.snipWe are moving towards the US culture, often commented on, where it's absolutely common to be asked for ID wherever you go, says Mr Hastings. If you're 21 or under, you should expect to be asked for ID, therefore carry some. (I have never been asked to show ID in the states, except at immigration)Others have had a similar experience. Headlines were made when a 72-year-old was unable to buy two bottles of Cabernet Sauvignon at Morrisons in Blackpool because he could not prove his age.http://news.bbc.co.u.../8693997.stmMr. Clegg.... I hope that fantastic speech of yours wasn't all form and no content!

Actually, I've been carded by pubs an bars in New York, particularly in areas around NYU. They seem to go for an everyone or no-one arrangement in order to avoid age discrimination lawsuits. On one memorable occassion, I was carded when going into a bar in mid-town New York with my 70 year old father! He didn't have any ID with him so I had to promise that I'd take the rap for him if there was a problem with the cops. Bizarre but true. Otherwise though, yes, I've never been asked for ID of any sort by anyone official in the US. In fact, many Federal offices have signs on the door stating that people will not be asked for ID so as not to put illegals and Ron Paul types off from entering.

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<b> (I have never been asked to show ID in the states, except at immigration)<i>

Depends on the state perhaps. There are some states where they card everyone regardless every time. Virginia is like that if memory serves.

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It's a load of nonsense though, don't you think? Fair enough if there's reason to suspect underage drinking.... but if you are obviously over age, what on earth is the point? Another little step to make we, the subjects, more subservient.... to anyone that demands it!

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It's a load of nonsense though, don't you think? Fair enough if there's reason to suspect underage drinking.... but if you are obviously over age, what on earth is the point? Another little step to make we, the subjects, more subservient.... to anyone that demands it!

Absolutely, utter nonsense. It's the perfect storm of over-legalisation and state control. If someone looks old enough to drink, they should be allowed to drink as far as I'm concerned. In the US, the problem is made infinitely worse by having a minimum 21 age for drinking in many places.

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It's a load of nonsense though, don't you think? Fair enough if there's reason to suspect underage drinking.... but if you are obviously over age, what on earth is the point? Another little step to make we, the subjects, more subservient.... to anyone that demands it!

It is a load of rubbish. Look who the source of the quote is, its just PR, he is touting his own "corporate responsibility" scheme as being effective. Its ********.

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National identity cards may have been scrapped, but that doesn't mean you don't need to carry other forms of ID. So there....The whole climate surrounding proof of age has changed in the last few years, says Mark Hastings of the Beer and Pub Association, which represents two-thirds of pubs in the UK. But awareness of the new rules is very high, he says."A recent survey showed 90% of 18- to 21-year-olds knew about Challenge 21 and have experienced a much more rigorous approach to ID checks.snipWe are moving towards the US culture, often commented on, where it's absolutely common to be asked for ID wherever you go, says Mr Hastings. If you're 21 or under, you should expect to be asked for ID, therefore carry some. (I have never been asked to show ID in the states, except at immigration)Others have had a similar experience. Headlines were made when a 72-year-old was unable to buy two bottles of Cabernet Sauvignon at Morrisons in Blackpool because he could not prove his age.http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/8693997.stmMr. Clegg.... I hope that fantastic speech of yours wasn't all form and no content!

a couple of months back i witnessed the absurdity of a young black man (mid to late 20s) accompanied by a young boy aged ~10 being refused 1/2 doz bottles of wine as part of a large mixed shopping basket for the offence failing to produce an id proving he was 25+ ! in fact, i thought it was so silly that i bought the booze for him myself but had to withstand the interrogation and close scrutiny of store manager, assorted staff and the store security guard, "do you know what you are doing, sir?" etc.

the cashier (a young moslem woman complete with veil) seemed particularly pleased with herself for having prevented a possible breach of the peace by refusing to serve the guy. lunacy!

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a couple of months back i witnessed the absurdity of a young black man (mid to late 20s) accompanied by a young boy aged ~10 being refused 1/2 doz bottles of wine as part of a large mixed shopping basket for the offence failing to produce an id proving he was 25+ ! in fact, i thought it was so silly that i bought the booze for him myself but had to withstand the interrogation and close scrutiny of store manager, assorted staff and the store security guard, "do you know what you are doing, sir?" etc.

the cashier (a young moslem woman complete with veil) seemed particularly pleased with herself for having prevented a possible breach of the peace by refusing to serve the guy. lunacy!

Where was this?

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National identity cards may have been scrapped, but that doesn't mean you don't need to carry other forms of ID. So there....The whole climate surrounding proof of age has changed in the last few years, says Mark Hastings of the Beer and Pub Association, which represents two-thirds of pubs in the UK. But awareness of the new rules is very high, he says."A recent survey showed 90% of 18- to 21-year-olds knew about Challenge 21 and have experienced a much more rigorous approach to ID checks.snipWe are moving towards the US culture, often commented on, where it's absolutely common to be asked for ID wherever you go, says Mr Hastings. If you're 21 or under, you should expect to be asked for ID, therefore carry some. (I have never been asked to show ID in the states, except at immigration)Others have had a similar experience. Headlines were made when a 72-year-old was unable to buy two bottles of Cabernet Sauvignon at Morrisons in Blackpool because he could not prove his age.http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/8693997.stmMr. Clegg.... I hope that fantastic speech of yours wasn't all form and no content!

Did I miss the bit where they seemed chuffed? I read the article you clipped from and paraphrased and at least 2/3's of it was dedicated to people arguing against high ID requirements.

I've been asked for ID in the US at least once during pretty much every visit (at least once a year) for years now and I'm the wrong side of my late 30's ( :(:lol: )

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Pretty well everybody I know drank when under 18. Even Prince Charles

Why do we make such a fuss about this?

Is it a hangover from Puritan times?

Agreed there are areas where youngsters hang out with cans and make a nuisance of themselves, but why not deal with them in situ? A swift arrival of a Police van followed my mass arrests will soon break up any trouble.

No, we have to go through a long tedious 'Fair to all' procedure at the check outs and burden the Police with paperwork.

Daft

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Because the comsumption of alcohol under 18 is not illegal, otherwise every parent who lets their children have a bit of wine or a sip of beer at home would be breaking the law.

It's youngsters, as you say, 'creating a nuisance' where the police can act. The actual consumption of the alcohol (outside areas where councils have put restrictions in known hot-spots) is not illegal. Perhaps it should be? Buy shares in brown paper bag manufacturers if it does.

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Pretty well everybody I know drank when under 18. Even Prince Charles

Why do we make such a fuss about this?

Is it a hangover from Puritan times?

Agreed there are areas where youngsters hang out with cans and make a nuisance of themselves, but why not deal with them in situ? A swift arrival of a Police van followed my mass arrests will soon break up any trouble.

No, we have to go through a long tedious 'Fair to all' procedure at the check outs and burden the Police with paperwork.

Daft

Best way to prevent the usual town centre scenes we have every weekend would be to allow teens to go into pubs and drink. We all did it. At that age you look up to the older guys in the bar who would keep order if you step out of line. It's those guys that teach the younger generation how to drink and that lesson is being lost as kids now drink on the park as it's cheaper.

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Best way to prevent the usual town centre scenes we have every weekend would be to allow teens to go into pubs and drink. We all did it. At that age you look up to the older guys in the bar who would keep order if you step out of line. It's those guys that teach the younger generation how to drink and that lesson is being lost as kids now drink on the park as it's cheaper.

Sensible.

But what chance do you have against British Press and Government?

There will always be a rat bag editor or publicity hungry politician who will big up a great fuss.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

Actually, I've been carded by pubs an bars in New York, particularly in areas around NYU. They seem to go for an everyone or no-one arrangement in order to avoid age discrimination lawsuits. On one memorable occassion, I was carded when going into a bar in mid-town New York with my 70 year old father! He didn't have any ID with him so I had to promise that I'd take the rap for him if there was a problem with the cops. Bizarre but true. Otherwise though, yes, I've never been asked for ID of any sort by anyone official in the US. In fact, many Federal offices have signs on the door stating that people will not be asked for ID so as not to put illegals and Ron Paul types off from entering.

Is there a high correlation between being American and moronic didacticism?

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Actually, I've been carded by pubs an bars in New York, particularly in areas around NYU. They seem to go for an everyone or no-one arrangement in order to avoid age discrimination lawsuits. On one memorable occassion, I was carded when going into a bar in mid-town New York with my 70 year old father! He didn't have any ID with him so I had to promise that I'd take the rap for him if there was a problem with the cops. Bizarre but true. Otherwise though, yes, I've never been asked for ID of any sort by anyone official in the US. In fact, many Federal offices have signs on the door stating that people will not be asked for ID so as not to put illegals and Ron Paul types off from entering.

Sigh. Will card people to determine their age so they can be discriminated against, but will card eveyone as we don't want an age discrimination law suit.

And what gives with Federal offices not asking for ID so that illegals will feel comfortable about asking for assistance?

My poor little mind pretzels at that sort of logic.

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Did I miss the bit where they seemed chuffed? I read the article you clipped from and paraphrased and at least 2/3's of it was dedicated to people arguing against high ID requirements.

I've been asked for ID in the US at least once during pretty much every visit (at least once a year) for years now and I'm the wrong side of my late 30's ( :(  :lol: )

Yes, perhaps I was a bit harsh on the beeb.... it was this sentence really "National identity cards may have been scrapped, but that doesn't mean you don't need to carry other forms of ID.".... I read it as "don't get carried away with all these promises of a return to normality by Cleggy boy..... we'll still grind you down".... do I need a psychiatrist? :rolleyes: Anyway, a comment after the article:I work in a local co-op and we are constantly under the threat of "test shoppers" sent in by the police or local council that are 17 but look much older to catch us out. We ask everyone who looks under 25 not only because its the law but if we do get caught out the £80 fine that we would personally have to pay out of our own pocket is more than most of us earn in a week. I'm not interested in serving children alcohol and support the law but I do feel very sorry for people who are around the age of 25-35 but look younger who i have to refuse sales to just because they have no ID. As usual the penalties in this country are too harsh for the majority of us they obey the law and the innocent get punished again.The law is rigorously applied by threatening unpaid members of the public to enforce it..... this culture really needs a good coat of looking at!

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While standing on the street outside a friend's house, waiting for him, a PCSO approached me and said I looked suspicious and asked for my ID.

I laughed at him, asking why I looked suspicious, and whether there had been reports of any crimes in the area.

No, there hadn't.

I politely informed him I was under no obligation to show him my ID and bid him a good day. He persisted saying that if I didn't show him my ID I could arrested for "suspicion of anti-social behaviour". When I asked him what law that was, that allows a PCSO to arrest anyone, let alone for what amounts to a thought crime, he stammered and I just basically said go ahead and arrest me. He waffled some more ********, quite taken back by a citizen finally standing up to the little thug, and sulked away with his tail between his legs.

Remember, you are under no obligation to show ID or give your details unless they have reasonable grounds to suspect you personally of an offence. Even then they still can't demand you show ID or give details unless you've actually been arrested and they want proof of who you are.

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Guest Noodle

it's funny how things have changed. I used to have no problem buying booze when I was thirteen but now that I'm 28 I get IDed a fair bit. But then I was an old looking 13 year old and am now a young looking 28 year old. A lot of supermarkets now have a challenge 25 rule for buying booze.

I always thought you were mid-foties!

You won't keep those youthful looks if you're on the mothers ruin!

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Moreover the BBC are absolutely ****-a-hoop at the new presence of Islamic garb in the House of Commons, as well as the wondorous "diversity"... http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/4530293.stm

"Campaign group Operation Black Vote (OBV) - which aims to increase the political representation and participation of ethnic minorities - said it welcomed the arrival of five new minority MPs, but the loss of two others was "bitterly disappointing". "

--that is clearly racism- celebrating an MP simply because of their foreign ethnicity. Why is it better than an English, Welsh, Scots or Irishman sitting in the House of Commons? Note that OBV "director" Simon Woolley is a fully paid-up Kommissar of the EHRC, most recently heard on national news channels accusing the police force of institutional racism again, due to the stop/search statistics (while conveniently ignoring criminal offending figures as a proprotion of multicult-ethno population..

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  • 293 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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