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Sledgehead

Cat Fleas : What Works?

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Since the next door neighbour's wife died, he's been spending less and less time in his home and more and more time at his new "lady friend's" place.

Upshot is his dear departed's cat has been meowing at my back door, in search of company, food, etc. Said cat has started kipping down in an old seed tray near my back door. Now it turns out the poor thing has fleas. Owner wants shot of the little mite, but I rate his chances of re-homing a 20 year old cat @ somewhere close to the square root of the reciprocal of infinity.

Naturally, while I intend to hold him to his duty as the cat's owner, I'd like to know what I should do to reduce the poor thing's flea problem / minimise the chances of infestation of my back garden, given that he's sleeping rough 'round my gaff.

Obviously I could repel the moggie whenever I'm around, but I'm a soft hearted fool so that's not much of a solution. Any actual experience with various products and accounts of effectiveness would be much appreciated. If you know of particularly efficacious brands please name them.

Cheers.

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Since the next door neighbour's wife died, he's been spending less and less time in his home and more and more time at his new "lady friend's" place.

Upshot is his dear departed's cat has been meowing at my back door, in search of company, food, etc. Said cat has started kipping down in an old seed tray near my back door. Now it turns out the poor thing has fleas. Owner wants shot of the little mite, but I rate his chances of re-homing a 20 year old cat @ somewhere close to the square root of the reciprocal of infinity.

Naturally, while I intend to hold him to his duty as the cat's owner, I'd like to know what I should do to reduce the poor thing's flea problem / minimise the chances of infestation of my back garden, given that he's sleeping rough 'round my gaff.

Obviously I could repel the moggie whenever I'm around, but I'm a soft hearted fool so that's not much of a solution. Any actual experience with various products and accounts of effectiveness would be much appreciated. If you know of particularly efficacious brands please name them.

Cheers.

Flea collars are rubbish in my experience, flea powder also. The only thing that I found that worked is the little tubes of organophospate you squirt onto the back of their necks. The main problem you'll have is re-infection though. You need to find all the places the moggy sleeps and totally sterilise them.

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Flea collars are rubbish in my experience, flea powder also. The only thing that I found that worked is the little tubes of organophospate you squirt onto the back of their necks. The main problem you'll have is re-infection though. You need to find all the places the moggy sleeps and totally sterilise them.

just the kind of answer I was looking for. Cheers!

What's the best way to sterilise?

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just the kind of answer I was looking for. Cheers!

What's the best way to sterilise?

You're welcome. Best bet is to chuck out all cat bedding tbh, it's easier than cleaning it. For carpets you can get some much stronger powder stuff which does work (but isn't safe to put on the cat itself) or steam cleaning also seemed to do the job for me.

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You're welcome. Best bet is to chuck out all cat bedding tbh, it's easier than cleaning it. For carpets you can get some much stronger powder stuff which does work (but isn't safe to put on the cat itself) or steam cleaning also seemed to do the job for me.

I've replaced his seed tray with a box, polystyrene, bubble-wrap and old material. I intend just to dump / burn and replace all of the above once a week, maybe far more frequently til the problem is under control, so that would sit well w/ your advice.

I don't allow him in the house, but he does however walk around my patio and sit on the lawn. Any ideas there?

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I don't allow him in the house, but he does however walk around my patio and sit on the lawn. Any ideas there?

I only ever found outdoor re-infection a problem with my moggies when they chose favourite spots under dry bushes in the summer - fleas don't like the cold it seems, so winter was never an issue. Unless you're living in the Scilly Isles, you'll probably be alright with that one so long as you deal with the rest of them before summer starts properly. As a fallback, I imagine any organophospate based garden pesticide would do the the job for outside areas.

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I only ever found outdoor re-infection a problem with my moggies when they chose favourite spots under dry bushes in the summer - fleas don't like the cold it seems, so winter was never an issue. Unless you're living in the Scilly Isles, you'll probably be alright with that one so long as you deal with the rest of them before summer starts properly. As a fallback, I imagine any organophospate based garden pesticide would do the the job for outside areas.

Sounds like all good stuff to me. Cheers once more.

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We've just had a flea problem with our two cats. Little blighters were making themselves right at home and our ankles were covered in bites. We went for the little tube on the back of the neck thing, but also had to deflea the house. I don't know the brand but we bought 'flea bombs' which are aerosol cans that you trigger in the main areas of the house and then release an anti-flea fog which settles into all the nooks and crannies that the fleas and their eggs are found.

Along with bit of intense hoovering this seems to have cleared up the problem.

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All good advice. As has been picked up the biggest problem is re-infection, where somebody has let the fleas get the upper hand (loads of small hard white flea eggs wherever the cat sleeps) it becomes near-impossible to get rid of them; there will always be somewhere with loads such as greenhouses. By starting off early you will avoid this problem.

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We had a huge flea infestation in our carpets. I found that 'Raid' cockroach killer sprayed on the carpets worked well.Fly killer does not.

You can test your carpets by putting a cup of warm water on them and leaving it there for a while, soon the little buggers will jump in.

If you use 'Frontline' on the cat every month, it becomes a walking death bomb for fleas. I have heard that just by doing this, it will eventually clear the house of fleas but have not tried it alone.

As the cat slept anywhere it fancied in the house and outside, its deadly presence soon finished off the fleas.

Disinfecting the outside is a waste of time. Other cats and dogs, mice, rats, birds all carry fleas.

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Guest AuntJess

Sounds like all good stuff to me. Cheers once more.

Go easy on general pesticides. They kill bees.sad.gif and may damage dicky birds. too many animals carry fleas and you don't disinifect the bird house, do you?smile.gif

I don't think you'll have a problem with fleas outside, and the 'Frontline' type squirty on the neck will do for him.

Best line of attack is changing bedding. Old newspaper is warm and can be binned easily.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

Put it in a sack with a brick and drop it in the river.

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We had a huge flea infestation in our carpets. I found that 'Raid' cockroach killer sprayed on the carpets worked well.Fly killer does not.

You can test your carpets by putting a cup of warm water on them and leaving it there for a while, soon the little buggers will jump in.

If you use 'Frontline' on the cat every month, it becomes a walking death bomb for fleas. I have heard that just by doing this, it will eventually clear the house of fleas but have not tried it alone.

As the cat slept anywhere it fancied in the house and outside, its deadly presence soon finished off the fleas.

Disinfecting the outside is a waste of time. Other cats and dogs, mice, rats, birds all carry fleas.

No, doesn't work and I have tried it. It's good but not that effective.

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When my two moggies were alive I found Frontline to be the best. Just squeeze the pipette contents on the back of the neck (the cats neck not yours!) and the jobs a good 'un!

Perhaps it might be worth seeing if he's willing to rehome the animal? It sounds like the poor cat is being a bit neglected. Some smaller local animal charities can often rehome older cats to a fosterer or long term carer who will love the animal.

You sound like a kind-hearted soul :) Cats are a very good judge of character!

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We've just had a flea problem with our two cats. Little blighters were making themselves right at home and our ankles were covered in bites. We went for the little tube on the back of the neck thing, but also had to deflea the house. I don't know the brand but we bought 'flea bombs' which are aerosol cans that you trigger in the main areas of the house and then release an anti-flea fog which settles into all the nooks and crannies that the fleas and their eggs are found.

Along with bit of intense hoovering this seems to have cleared up the problem.

Yikes! I'm glad I haven't let the little moggie in! Still, good to hear you sorted things out. Thanks for the advice!

He appeared today with what seems like a greasy neck. I guess that's a spot-on treatment, yes?

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flamethrower.jpg

If only I could do that to the patio before any eggs hatch. Will boiling water do on areas he kips doown on during the day??

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All good advice. As has been picked up the biggest problem is re-infection, where somebody has let the fleas get the upper hand (loads of small hard white flea eggs wherever the cat sleeps) it becomes near-impossible to get rid of them; there will always be somewhere with loads such as greenhouses. By starting off early you will avoid this problem.

Cheers Frank. Any idea what insecticides are best for areas most likely to have the greatest number of eggs? Is there anything that specifically tagrets these or the larvae?

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How strange! I found that the Dr. neck stuff didn't do a thing in our case, and having the 'flea collars are rubbish' attitude mean't that I didn't try that either. When I eventually tried a collar out of desperation, all fleas cleared off within a week!

Flea collars are rubbish in my experience, flea powder also. The only thing that I found that worked is the little tubes of organophospate you squirt onto the back of their necks. The main problem you'll have is re-infection though. You need to find all the places the moggy sleeps and totally sterilise them.

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If only I could do that to the patio before any eggs hatch. Will boiling water do on areas he kips doown on during the day??

I'd imagine so, maybe some kind of spray? Actually maybe a local exterminator/ pest chap might be able to give some advice?

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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