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Guest Absolutely Fabulous

Why Aren't We Eating Caulifower Anymore?

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Guest AuntJess

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/may/17/decline-cauliflower-sales

Speaking for myself I can only eag this veg, raw or lightly steamed. If I ever go out for a meal I NEVER order it as they overcook it dreadfully and make slimy and yukky.

When I DO cook it I prefer it with a cheese or savoury white sauce. On its own it IS boring, IMO.

I make a point of eating it tho', as a nickname that a nutritionist once gave it , " the white knight against cancer" is an inducement.wink.gif

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=13

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My wife is doing her bit to keep sales up. She likes it raw in salad along with beetroot amongst other things. I don't rate it myself, but can tolerate it.

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/may/17/decline-cauliflower-sales

Speaking for myself I can only eag this veg, raw or lightly steamed. If I ever go out for a meal I NEVER order it as they overcook it dreadfully and make slimy and yukky.

When I DO cook it I prefer it with a cheese or savoury white sauce. On its own it IS boring, IMO.

I make a point of eating it tho', as a nickname that a nutritionist once gave it , " the white knight against cancer" is an inducement.wink.gif

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=13

Cooked some at the weekend, one of my preferred vegetables. I agree that when over-cooked and soggy its less interesting to eat.

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It's not the best tasting vegetable when boiled. The only dish I would make with it is cauliflower cheese.

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/may/17/decline-cauliflower-sales

Speaking for myself I can only eag this veg, raw or lightly steamed. If I ever go out for a meal I NEVER order it as they overcook it dreadfully and make slimy and yukky.

When I DO cook it I prefer it with a cheese or savoury white sauce. On its own it IS boring, IMO.

I make a point of eating it tho', as a nickname that a nutritionist once gave it , " the white knight against cancer" is an inducement.wink.gif

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=13

Cooked al dente with a good cheese sauce, delish.

Mr B also likes it raw. I have to keep him away if I'm dividing it up to cook, or he'll pick so much that there's hardly any left.

Trouble with cauli is, most people's experience has consisted of an overcooked mush, often with a 'cheese' sauce that isn't nearly cheesy enough. You need really good, mature Cheddar, and plenty of it. A smidgeon of English mustard also adds a certain something.

I also do a macaroni/cauliflower cheese mix, sometimes with a few sprigs of broccoli thrown in. Always goes down well.

Small florets are good in stir-fries, too.

And in veggie soups, if you just add them for the last minute.

I actually used to have a very old recipe book (written by a NZer) which told you to boil cauliflower for 20 minutes!

Nuff sed, really.

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Guest AuntJess

Cooked al dente with a good cheese sauce, delish.

Mr B also likes it raw. I have to keep him away if I'm dividing it up to cook, or he'll pick so much that there's hardly any left.

Trouble with cauli is, most people's experience has consisted of an overcooked mush, often with a 'cheese' sauce that isn't nearly cheesy enough. You need really good, mature Cheddar, and plenty of it. A smidgeon of English mustard also adds a certain something.

I also do a macaroni/cauliflower cheese mix, sometimes with a few sprigs of broccoli thrown in. Always goes down well.

Small florets are good in stir-fries, too.

And in veggie soups, if you just add them for the last minute.

I actually used to have a very old recipe book (written by a NZer) which told you to boil cauliflower for 20 minutes!

Nuff sed, really.

Omigod!ohmy.gif That musta been disgusting! As to picking at the raw bits whilst preparing. I do thatunsure.gif But I do prefer crunchy to slimy. It is lovely in salads and it does well in stir fries, as there is usually a strong sauce to disguise the sweet blandness of cauli.

Agree about the strong cheesy flavour, as it has virtually no flavour - save its sweetness, which I don't care for - and a strong cheddar is just the ticket.smile.gif

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Because it makes you fart!

I'd go with this. Not only farting but uber rank farting at that.

I don't mind cauliflower but it is the least liked veg by my brood who are not generally a fussy lot.

I can't eat my veg undercooked 'cause it plays havoc with my stomach. particularly brocolli. Unfortunately, I have to cook it all to a pulp to avoid rolling round in agony 2 hours later.

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Like much fresh produce, the supermarket fare tastes of nothing and compared to, say the ubiquitous carrot, they are surprisingly expensive for something so unfashionable.,

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Guest AuntJess

Because it makes you fart!

Cause it has sulphur in it which is a great cleanser. Eat it before you go out into the open air for a walk. The dicky birds won't mind.smile.gif

Defo. not the stuff to eat before an important interview/meeting.wink.gif

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Guest theboltonfury

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/may/17/decline-cauliflower-sales

Speaking for myself I can only eag this veg, raw or lightly steamed. If I ever go out for a meal I NEVER order it as they overcook it dreadfully and make slimy and yukky.

When I DO cook it I prefer it with a cheese or savoury white sauce. On its own it IS boring, IMO.

I make a point of eating it tho', as a nickname that a nutritionist once gave it , " the white knight against cancer" is an inducement.wink.gif

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=13

Here's a thought. Unless it's covered in cheese or part of an Indian dish, it's ******ing disgusting!!

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Here's a thought. Unless it's covered in cheese or part of an Indian dish, it's ******ing disgusting!!

Excellent! :lol:

If I said that to Her, she'd accuse me of making a personal attack. :lol::blink:

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I love cauliflower, such a refreshing vegetable and these days not so easy to find......nice with a crispy tempura batter...big tip; never throw away the green leaves they taste like cabbage and can go nicely towards a tasty vegetable bake with a bechamel sauce. ;)

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It is the 'radio star' to broccoli's 'video'.

Maybe.

No, I absolutely understand.

Cauliflower is the Rodney to brocoli's Del Boy.

The Granville to brocoli's Arkwright.

The Penfold to brocoli's Danger Mouse.

The Clegg to brocoli's Cameron.

Cauliflower cheese, when it's done well, is fab.

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Guest theboltonfury

Excellent! :lol:

If I said that to Her, she'd accuse me of making a personal attack. :lol::blink:

I love veg. However, for me, the true test is what does it taste like on its own. Broccoli is nice, so are peas, carrots, various beans, potatoes, leeks, plus many more. Sprouts were sent to my table by the Gods as a treat if I've been good. When one eats a plain piece of boiled cauliflower, it has the most acrid, unpleasant taste. Not quite up there with Okra, but close.

It's really no wonder that Asians decided to hide its flavour with a mountain of spices.

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I love veg. However, for me, the true test is what does it taste like on its own. Broccoli is nice, so are peas, carrots, various beans, potatoes, leeks, plus many more. Sprouts were sent to my table by the Gods as a treat if I've been good. When one eats a plain piece of boiled cauliflower, it has the most acrid, unpleasant taste. Not quite up there with Okra, but close.

It's really no wonder that Asians decided to hide its flavour with a mountain of spices.

I read in Richard Dawkins' book, The Greatest Show on Earth, that cabbage, cauliflower, brussels sprouts etc are all variants on a stringy cabbage plant that has been bred over the centuries by farmers.

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Guest theboltonfury

I read in Richard Dawkins' book, The Greatest Show on Earth, that cabbage, cauliflower, brussels sprouts etc are all variants on a stringy cabbage plant that has been bred over the centuries by farmers.

Is it a 'readable' book? By that, I mean will it blind me with science or will it explain things to me in a way a non scientist or biologist can understand. I read the God Delusion and thought it was absolutely riveting, so I don't mind Dawkinsd at all.

I read a book called the 'Molecule Hunt' - stayed with it for 350 pages having been tormented by DNA type speak. Only to find the conclusion was that cavemen also ate cabbage. Well, you learn something everyday!

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I read in Richard Dawkins' book, The Greatest Show on Earth, that cabbage, cauliflower, brussels sprouts etc are all variants on a stringy cabbage plant that has been bred over the centuries by farmers.

I don't believe you - I want to see the missing links :ph34r:

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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