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gruffydd

Terrible Year For British Holiday Cottage Letting

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I've never seen such poor holiday home occupancy here in West Wales and I'm told this is repeated across Britain. I'm watching the holiday home crowd squeeeel, and loving it :lol:

Edited by gruffydd

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I had long suspected that the staycation will be people simply staying at home as opposed to holidaying in the UK as opposed to going overseas.

People are broke.

Can you give any more info on West Wales? So many homes have been bought as holiday homes down there, and prices ramped accordingly, that the entire economy is dependent upon people renting them out... and, boy, those weekly rental prices are prohibitive.

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A farmer I know has six holiday lets in the Bala area.

He has complained about poor lettings and he has been in the business for years.

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I had long suspected that the staycation will be people simply staying at home as opposed to holidaying in the UK as opposed to going overseas.

People are broke.

Can you give any more info on West Wales? So many homes have been bought as holiday homes down there, and prices ramped accordingly, that the entire economy is dependent upon people renting them out... and, boy, those weekly rental prices are prohibitive.

Agree with everything you say there. We've even found it cheaper to get a ferry france and a gite than it is to get a cottage in the UK

Our holiday this year is in the UK and we're hiring a private static caravan at Butlins Minehead. Butlins want nearly £2000 for a week in August, we've got the caravan for £700 and as Minehead doesnt use the pass system like the other Haven sites we've got everything included in that price.

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Two factors:

HAve you seen the price of UK holiday lets? They are very pricey, not much of a cheap option for foreign travel.

I was one of those who stayed in the UK to enjoy the BBQ summer last year. Yes, two weeks in non-stop torrential downpours.

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I've never seen such poor holiday home occupancy here in West Wales and I'm told this is repeated across Britain. I'm watching the holiday home crowd squeeeel, and loving it :lol:

Maybe it is a Welsh thing?

My folks run a holiday cottage that is part of their farm in Cumbria, have had it ever since they bought the farm 40 years ago. Things are not too bad for them this year, they say they have as many bookings as usual (ie full up until the end of Sept then already booked for the festive period. They do get alot of repeat custom so that may explain things and when I compare the price they charge to others in the area the price is pretty good too.

But I agree there are parts of the UK (Cumbria included) where there are far too many holiday homes, though I dont mind them half as much as the morons who buy them solely for their own use and therefore totally killing off the local economy and services. My parents are kind of stuck with theirs unless they ever need to emply full time staff as it is too integrated into the farm (as is their own house) for most normal people to put up with for more than a few days (the milking machine kicking in at 5.30am isnot to everyones taste :)

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I've never seen such poor holiday home occupancy here in West Wales and I'm told this is repeated across Britain. I'm watching the holiday home crowd squeeeel, and loving it :lol:

I can understand that you may resent the people who buy 2nd homes and only occupy them for a couple of weeks a year, but surely the holiday homes that are let out for a good portion of the year are an important part of the tourism industry in places like Wales. If it really is the case that fewer people are holidaying there, then it's going to have a significant effect on tourism employment, and knock on effects to other industries. Certainly nothing to celebrate.

I'm renting a small house in Cornwall again this year. Beautiful scenery and rain doesn't matter when you're in the surf, can't wait!

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Agree with everything you say there. We've even found it cheaper to get a ferry france and a gite than it is to get a cottage in the UK

Our holiday this year is in the UK and we're hiring a private static caravan at Butlins Minehead. Butlins want nearly £2000 for a week in August, we've got the caravan for £700 and as Minehead doesnt use the pass system like the other Haven sites we've got everything included in that price.

im heading there as well, last year went to skegness. its not as cheap as going abroad its funny people think in a recession they will just holiday at home instead. Well thats nonsense its more expensive to holiday here than anywhere else. much cheaper to spend a week in spain or even usa.

the people are just pretending to holiday in uk because they cant afford to go anywhere, lots will go stay with relatives for a few days im sure.

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Two factors:

HAve you seen the price of UK holiday lets? They are very pricey, not much of a cheap option for foreign travel.

I was one of those who stayed in the UK to enjoy the BBQ summer last year. Yes, two weeks in non-stop torrential downpours.

If there is only 2 of you you'd be pushed to find a holiday home for a week which is cheaper than flying to the canaries all inclusive.

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If the Volcanic Ash does not finally p**s off for good their fortunes could be reversed. ;)

Still too expensive. People will camp of B&B.

In most areas you could get a good quality hotel for 2 for less than the cost of renting a cottage etc

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Still too expensive. People will camp of B&B.

In most areas you could get a good quality hotel for 2 for less than the cost of renting a cottage etc

Very true I went to the lake district this year as my foriegn holiday got Eyjafjallajokull'ed. Just me a the girlfriend, stayed in some a very nice hotel and an inn relatively cheaply. Would never bother with a cottage. Saying that Im not plan a flying holiday in the foreseeable future so we will definatly be going back and I think many people will be the same so for a group might be worth it so I can see holiday let's doing very well in the coming months/years.

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I had long suspected that the staycation will be people simply staying at home as opposed to holidaying in the UK as opposed to going overseas.

People are broke.

Can you give any more info on West Wales? So many homes have been bought as holiday homes down there, and prices ramped accordingly, that the entire economy is dependent upon people renting them out... and, boy, those weekly rental prices are prohibitive.

Heh not for bikers like me get a tent, a stove sleeping bag and you can go camp out somewhere in the lakes without too much trouble, the local holiday industries bar the odd pub get nowt.

Canal riding when the tyres and pump arrive (I seem to have broken my steel one) will probably be a couple of pubs one at the destination and one on the way back.

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Last September we got a 3 bedroom gite in the Dordogne with swimming pool and a few acres of beautiful gardens for £250 for the week. The flights cost a total of £100 all in for 2 and the journey time was 6 hours door to door with anothe £120 for the hire car.

Next week we are off to Northumbria, are getting a small 1 bed apartment (only booked yesterday) for £350 and it'll take us 7 hours to drive there and cost £100 in petrol.

There is nothing cheap about holidaying at home!

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Everybody has brought caravans! £250 for two weeks on a really good site in Dorset in late June/early July

Holiday Cottages have always been expensive.

As for second homers, I used to live in Cumbria, still really annoyed that they pushed house prices up there yet had council tax rebates of 50%, if I had my way they would pay an extra 60% on top of normal council tax for the damage they do to the local economy.

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Probably not an uncommon phenomenon.

[slightly O/T]

I'm currently out in Cyprus on holiday, i'm not sure how reliant its tourism industry had previously been on visitors from Greece, not all that much I suspect, but because of this and the European situation generally I suppose the place is dead, completely and eerily dead. The [fairly expensive/upmarket] hotel I'm in is huge and can't be more than 5% occupied. It's early season but the staff say that this kind of quietness is unknown in their memories.

And the whole island, at least the part I'm in, seems to be covered in huge plots of eye-wateringly expensive [although everything seems shockingly expensive anyway], clearly unsold, upmarket, buy to let/holiday type homes. I might snap up a couple of bargains whilst I'm out here actually. It looks like some of the grottier places are listed at for only fifteen or so times the annual Cypriot GDP per capita.

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I can understand that you may resent the people who buy 2nd homes and only occupy them for a couple of weeks a year, but surely the holiday homes that are let out for a good portion of the year are an important part of the tourism industry in places like Wales. If it really is the case that fewer people are holidaying there, then it's going to have a significant effect on tourism employment, and knock on effects to other industries. Certainly nothing to celebrate.

I'm renting a small house in Cornwall again this year. Beautiful scenery and rain doesn't matter when you're in the surf, can't wait!

Holiday homes in Wales are occupied for around half the year at best - last year it was 48% occupancy on average - and that was the busiest year for a while - most are occupied for far less time than that. The lowest occupancies are in the traditional tourist areas such as Pembrokeshire and Cardigan Bay where you drop quite a few percent on that. Doesn't take a rocket scientist...

I'm celebrating - we're seeing forced sellers for the first time in a long time - and long may that continue.

Now all we need is a hike in interest rates :lol::lol::lol:

Edited by gruffydd

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I had long suspected that the staycation will be people simply staying at home as opposed to holidaying in the UK as opposed to going overseas.

People are broke.

Can you give any more info on West Wales? So many homes have been bought as holiday homes down there, and prices ramped accordingly, that the entire economy is dependent upon people renting them out... and, boy, those weekly rental prices are prohibitive.

All tourism sectors are suffering very badly - many of the usually booked up campsites still have vacancies in July. There are major problems - several farmers I know own several off-farm cottages - mortgaged up to the hilt coz property prices always go up... I'm starting to see forced sales of holiday homes :-)

There is resistance to discounting because they can't cover the mortgage repayments if they do that.

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If the Volcanic Ash does not finally p**s off for good their fortunes could be reversed. ;)

People are not going on holiday as much - that's a major problem - it completely destroys your occupancy. The Guardian readers can no longer afford 3/4 holidays a year it seems.

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Apart form taking a tent on your back which i don't consider a holiday ( some might ) there is not such a thing as a cheap holiday here or abroad.

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Maybe it is a Welsh thing?

My folks run a holiday cottage that is part of their farm in Cumbria, have had it ever since they bought the farm 40 years ago. Things are not too bad for them this year, they say they have as many bookings as usual (ie full up until the end of Sept then already booked for the festive period. They do get alot of repeat custom so that may explain things and when I compare the price they charge to others in the area the price is pretty good too.

But I agree there are parts of the UK (Cumbria included) where there are far too many holiday homes, though I dont mind them half as much as the morons who buy them solely for their own use and therefore totally killing off the local economy and services. My parents are kind of stuck with theirs unless they ever need to emply full time staff as it is too integrated into the farm (as is their own house) for most normal people to put up with for more than a few days (the milking machine kicking in at 5.30am isnot to everyones taste :)

Cumbria / The Lakes is a different market to much of the UK seaside market. For a start it is a 10 month season in the Lakes, whereas many seaside towns are limited to just a few months. Secondly the weather is less crucial when you are hillwalking compared with hoping to enjoy a family beach holiday.

I am on the IOW. I will try to find out what is going on here.

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Guest The Relaxation Suite

Two factors:

HAve you seen the price of UK holiday lets? They are very pricey,

In the late 1980s a week in a Welsh holiday cottage cost about £100, which is about £216 today. Holiday cottages in that part of Wales today seem to be going for around £330 - £350, so there is a marked percentage increase in the cost of staying in the UK for a week, up to 50% and more.

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Those commenting on the price for 2, should consider the price for 1. It's the same price whether there's one of you or two.... so I don't holiday.

I'm close to a place that sleeps 7, new to market this year as a holiday let... so far it's had three bookings. One week at Easter, a 3-day weekend over May Bank holiday and it's got people in now. Five people, £80/week each, it's a 3-bed house close to the beach and with loads of parking.

Owner's left the country and left it sitting for a year in case they came back, he then popped back just to put it with agents. Must be costing him a fortune in mortgage payments, insurance, hotel TV license, utilities.

Total book price turnover to date is about £1300 (from memory). This week's price is £425.

If anybody is looking at holidaying in August, I've noticed a LOT of places down here (far far south west) seem to have the August week, starting with the August bank holiday Monday, at strangely cheap prices. e.g. they'd go from (say) £800/week up to that Saturday, £550/week for that last week of August, then back up to £700/week again for the first week in September!

A local holiday park has a 6-berth mobile home for 7 nights from Saturday 28th August to Saturday 4 September for £325 (4-berth £310). £60/week if you bring your own touring caravan! The week before these prices are £430, £475, £68.

Edited by ScaredEitherWay

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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