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mrjake

Advice On A Second Viewing

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Hi,

I'm new to the house buying market and have my eye on a property. We did a first viewing and really like it, so thinking of a second viewing.

We have a mortgage in principle on the way

I'm guessing that the norm is to make an offer after the second viewing. Would it be normal to do 3rd or 4th viewings?

My question is, what questions should I have ready for my second viewing, and what should I look out for in the house? How long would you spend looking around the house on a second viewing?

And any other help/advice/tips would be appreciated!

thanks!!

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Hi,

I'm new to the house buying market and have my eye on a property. We did a first viewing and really like it, so thinking of a second viewing.

We have a mortgage in principle on the way

I'm guessing that the norm is to make an offer after the second viewing. Would it be normal to do 3rd or 4th viewings?

My question is, what questions should I have ready for my second viewing, and what should I look out for in the house? How long would you spend looking around the house on a second viewing?

And any other help/advice/tips would be appreciated!

thanks!!

More than 2 viewings? Why? The property isn't going to change inside.

I would go back and check out the area at different times of the day/week to see if it's on a commuter rat-run. Find out if any major developments have been planned for the area (might be on hold for now but could happen later on). Make a check-list for each room and take notes - this will help later. Try to speak with the neighbours - they will be just as interested in who might be moving in as you will be in who's going to be next door to you. I take it some kind of survey has been prepared? Have you read the forums?

Strange how we are getting newbies signing up just to ask for buying advice at the moment when every economic indicator screams "DON'T BUY"...

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More than 2 viewings? Why? The property isn't going to change inside.

ok fair enough, this is why I asked. I was thinking if I'm putting down 200k+ on something I'd want to maybe show people it etc, but yea I had no idea if this was acceptable or not.... and apparently not :-D so thanks

I take it some kind of survey has been prepared? Have you read the forums?

- what kind of survey?

Strange how we are getting newbies signing up just to ask for buying advice at the moment when every economic indicator screams "DON'T BUY"...

-ok now i'm worrying....

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ok fair enough, this is why I asked. I was thinking if I'm putting down 200k+ on something I'd want to maybe show people it etc, but yea I had no idea if this was acceptable or not.... and apparently not :-D so thanks

- what kind of survey?

-ok now i'm worrying....

If you are spending 200k+ then you need to make your own mind up, family and friends will have their opinion of whether something is good or bad but it will relate to how they live and they wont be the ones living there every day, e.g a downstairs toilet may be brilliant if you have kids but if you dont might annoy you royally (just an example) so depending on your/their circumstances opinions could differ.

And you are right to worry, before you drop this kind of money do some research, prices may go up or may go down and whatever is right for you applies, but dont spend the money if you are hoping to make a killing, spend it on somewhere to live thats the safest answer

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I've done three viewings when I've bought before. And when I've sold my buyers did three or four viewings. I don't think its unusual. Its a lot of money, so why not do multiple viewings? Its good to take someone with you. I've taken my mom who has bought loads of houses in her life so picks up on things I might not. An impartial pair of eyes can be a good thing. Spend as long as you want looking round - you're the boss. I'd say an hour is fair. I've sometimes told the estate agent I want to spend a decent amount of time there prior to a possible offer, so he can schedule his diary accordingly.

I always check things like if the gutters are clean. Not important in themselves, but might give an indication of how well the vendor has looked after the house. If they keep on top of the little jobs, you can be more confident that they've kept on top of the serious jobs. And I check how old the boiler is, as that's a grand to replace.

I'm no expert but hope this helps! You wouldn't do a survey until you've had an offer accepted, so I'm not sure what pyracantha is on about.

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I've done three viewings when I've bought before. And when I've sold my buyers did three or four viewings. I don't think its unusual. Its a lot of money, so why not do multiple viewings? Its good to take someone with you. I've taken my mom who has bought loads of houses in her life so picks up on things I might not. An impartial pair of eyes can be a good thing. Spend as long as you want looking round - you're the boss. I'd say an hour is fair. I've sometimes told the estate agent I want to spend a decent amount of time there prior to a possible offer, so he can schedule his diary accordingly.

I always check things like if the gutters are clean. Not important in themselves, but might give an indication of how well the vendor has looked after the house. If they keep on top of the little jobs, you can be more confident that they've kept on top of the serious jobs. And I check how old the boiler is, as that's a grand to replace.

I'm no expert but hope this helps! You wouldn't do a survey until you've had an offer accepted, so I'm not sure what pyracantha is on about.

thanks pablo, good to get some mixed opinions

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More than 2 viewings? Why? The property isn't going to change inside.

But your observations of it will. I've usually done at least 3 viewings before making an offer. I've not planned it out that way, it's just emerged like that. First viewing is all heart, second viewing is all head.

I drag the floorplan from rightmove into PowerPoint, scale it according to the room measurements given in the blurb, and then drag scale furniture icons over it. This just tells you if you've deceived yourself as to the amount of space you're getting.

So sometimes I've done a 3rd viewing just to take some very specific measurements. Maybe as a FTB you don't have a stack of furniture to worry about, but you get the idea anyway.

If the owners are in when you view, ask them what they think of the area and why they are moving on. On 2nd/3rd viewings I tend to look really hard at the way-they-live signs to indicate how the property really works - i.e. portable radiators in living room/bedroom = heating is inadequate. Dehumidifier = double glazing has insufficient vents. Litter in street outside = noisy at night (maybe). Pavements/road gutters swept clean = owner (maybe) has cleaned up outside ... why? Wheelie bins at front and kitchen at back = you will be walking with a manky bin bag through your living room twice a week. Understairs cupboard rammed with anything and everything = they've tidied up, imagine all that junk laying around the house, that's how the place will look once you're living normally in it. Tyre marks on grass verges = parking is a over-subscribed (have a look at the street on a Sunday evening).

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I also put the room dimensions into Excel to calculate the exact(ish) floor area of the house and compare with other houses I've viewed. This is because I find it almost impossible to determine by eye how big a house is as the naked eye is so easily tricked by the amount of furniture, the height of ceilings or the colour of the walls and carpets.

I also measure the size of the garden, as this is never on the particulars but is important to me (perhaps its not important to most people?)

I'm obsessed by cost per square foot of both the building and the plot, but it seems that most people don't care about this?

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I also put the room dimensions into Excel to calculate the exact(ish) floor area of the house

Definitely a good idea! I divide out the cost to get a £/sq ft figure - this is then comparable across different properties.

Sometimes this is quoted on the floorplans. Other times I add up the length dimensions across one wall of the floorplan, and then add up the width dimensions across the other wall. Multiply out etc.

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this is all really great guys, sounds like more than 2 viewings is the norm

some really useful input, keep it coming!!:)

I've done at least 3 viewings in the past, and have told the EA that I'll want more than the 10 mins they usually allow.

It's a huge investment - you're entitled to take your time.

Also, there are often things you miss first time around, or forget to ask.

Which way does the garden (if any) face ?

When was the boiler installed? (i.e. newish or on its last legs?)

Does the shower (if any) actually work properly? Never be afraid to turn taps on and check. I've seen showers that look all very nice but only give a trickle.

Wiring - if it's an older property, has it been re-wired?

Window frames - are they sound?

Very important - if there's a new kitchen, boiler etc. ask whether it was installed by someone qualified - and say you'll want to see the

Part P/Corgi paperwork etc. . (See also wiring). There are a lot of cowboys about, and esp. if a place has been done up to sell you have to be very vigilant. A quick-lick tart-up can cover all sorts of horrors.

Good luck.

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Very useful..Thanks

I've done at least 3 viewings in the past, and have told the EA that I'll want more than the 10 mins they usually allow.

It's a huge investment - you're entitled to take your time.

Also, there are often things you miss first time around, or forget to ask.

Which way does the garden (if any) face ?

When was the boiler installed? (i.e. newish or on its last legs?)

Does the shower (if any) actually work properly? Never be afraid to turn taps on and check. I've seen showers that look all very nice but only give a trickle.

Wiring - if it's an older property, has it been re-wired?

Window frames - are they sound?

Very important - if there's a new kitchen, boiler etc. ask whether it was installed by someone qualified - and say you'll want to see the

Part P/Corgi paperwork etc. . (See also wiring). There are a lot of cowboys about, and esp. if a place has been done up to sell you have to be very vigilant. A quick-lick tart-up can cover all sorts of horrors.

Good luck.

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Very useful..Thanks

I would inspect roof from outside looking for missing tiles, chimney for poor pointing ( take binoculars) and gutters and drainpipes. Inspect outside walls for any cracks or poorly fitted windows. Lift manhole covers ( i take a wrecking bar) and ask owners to flush each wc in turn, this will tell you how well each drain works, repeat for each sink and bath. Inside the property, go into loft ( take collapsable ladder and torch) and inspect roof from inside. Go into each room, check each wall for cracks and windows and door for fit. Ask owner to turn on central heating and check each radiator comes on hot both at the bottom and top. Ask for service records of boiler. Inspect fuse box to see how old wiring is likely to be. Using a plug in socket tester, I would check electric sockets for correct wiring. Check any appliances the seller is leaving. Check the shower works by turning on.

Extensions, ask to copy of building regs approval and planning permission (later not always required).

Talk to neighbours and to local authority re future developments in area.

Ask about schools, distance to train station, buses, doctors, dentist etc. Use google earth to find out about area.

If you are unsure on building construction get a book like Collins DIY manual ( amazon is your friend here). Google "snagging", although this is written in terms of new houses much applies to older property.

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I would inspect roof from outside looking for missing tiles, chimney for poor pointing ( take binoculars) and gutters and drainpipes. Inspect outside walls for any cracks or poorly fitted windows. Lift manhole covers ( i take a wrecking bar) and ask owners to flush each wc in turn, this will tell you how well each drain works, repeat for each sink and bath. Inside the property, go into loft ( take collapsable ladder and torch) and inspect roof from inside. Go into each room, check each wall for cracks and windows and door for fit. Ask owner to turn on central heating and check each radiator comes on hot both at the bottom and top. Ask for service records of boiler. Inspect fuse box to see how old wiring is likely to be. Using a plug in socket tester, I would check electric sockets for correct wiring. Check any appliances the seller is leaving. Check the shower works by turning on.

Extensions, ask to copy of building regs approval and planning permission (later not always required).

Talk to neighbours and to local authority re future developments in area.

Ask about schools, distance to train station, buses, doctors, dentist etc. Use google earth to find out about area.

If you are unsure on building construction get a book like Collins DIY manual ( amazon is your friend here). Google "snagging", although this is written in terms of new houses much applies to older property.

This is all good advice although to be honest if you started lifting my manhole covers during a viewing and asking me to flush loos I might start to think that you were one of those annoying tyre kickers.

I buy things off people rather than what they are selling. Difficult to explain, and it does come with experience, but if the vendors are right then usually that's a good start. But one thing that no one has mentioned is local authority planning sites. Most Planning Depts. have reasonable web sites now that can be searched via post code/street name. Have a look at what has been applied for in the past with the property (have they used the 30% rule all up) And see what the neighbours have applied for.

This is an absolute must-do if it's a rural property.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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