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Dave Spart

The Inevitable Forthcoming Industrial Action.

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Not the bankers.

It's the fatcat capitalist bosses who have sacked British workers and sent their jobs abroad in the name of extra profit.

If the fatcat bosses hadn't done that there would have been no need for the State to employ all the sacked workers.

The problem with this is that we are operating in a global market.

You can't have DVD players for a tenner in Tesco AND have full, living wage employment.

We made our choice with our wallets (credit).

Jim

Edited by JimDiGritz

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I really think that if the government "did a Reagan" they would get support from a lot of people. Remember when the air traffic controllers went on strike? He fired em all. Pretty popular it was as well. Wonder if the UK government has the balls?

The lazy Labour supporting strikers will get no support from. . . me.

Edited by cockrobin

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My nearest supermarket is a Morrisons/co-op thing. It's awful quality and shocking prices has boosted the fortunes of theblocal shops, 2 new greengrocers have opened!

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My nearest supermarket is a Morrisons/co-op thing. It's awful quality and shocking prices has boosted the fortunes of theblocal shops, 2 new greengrocers have opened!

No that cant happen. Az is an expert on retail competition (he has unparalleled experience of it sitting in a class room teaching physics) and its effects and causes, you are lying it doesnt matter what the customer wants, if they start shopping in local grocers, Morrisons will kidnap them and force them into their shop

Edited by Tamara De Lempicka

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Not the bankers.

It's the fatcat capitalist bosses who have sacked British workers and sent their jobs abroad in the name of extra profit.

If the fatcat bosses hadn't done that there would have been no need for the State to employ all the sacked workers.

Exactly!!! Most of the public sector were only employed under Labour to keep unemployment figures down, we don't need them, so if they do go on strike we will not notice and we will not have to pay them. Let them strike!

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No that cant happen. Az is an expert on retail competition and its effects and causes, you are lying it doesnt matter what the customer wants, if they start shopping in local grocers, Morrisons will kidnap them and force them into their shop

Morrisons sell cheap vodka and meths, keeps 'em going

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The problem with this is that we are operating in a global market.

You can't have DVD players for a tenner in Tesco AND have full, living wage employment.

We made our choice with our wallets (credit).

Jim

In reality, the monetary policy of central bankers is to blame. The Asians for pegging their currencies, and the Westerners for sticking to a CPI target which demands that things get more expensive all the time, when technology advances has made everything much cheaper over time. Hence the biggest global credit bubble ever.

An individual company has no real choice but to chase the cheapest production, this is just a reaction to central bank policies.

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Cuts are needed, however:

1. Government need to be aware of timing and locations of the pruning, we can't afford the same mistakes of Thatcher

2. Be ready for massive private sector bankruptcies and redundancies in the wake of public sector cuts. Unintended consequences and all that.

3. Before cutting NHS/Police/School admin & bureaucracy, make sure you remove the requirements that created the need for such work in the first place. Things will get very messy very quickly without this careful consideration beforehand. A simplistic notion that many still refuse to recognise on this board.

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Cuts are needed, however:

1. Government need to be aware of timing and locations of the pruning, we can't afford the same mistakes of Thatcher

2. Be ready for massive private sector bankruptcies and redundancies in the wake of public sector cuts. Unintended consequences and all that.

3. Before cutting NHS/Police/School admin & bureaucracy, make sure you remove the requirements that created the need for such work in the first place. Things will get very messy very quickly without this careful consideration beforehand. A simplistic notion that many still refuse to recognise on this board.

1 The govt is running out of being given the right to determine the time and location of cuts. If they wanted that luxury then they should have started in 2005 or before, Ultimately it looks to me that at somepoint within the next two years the markets will will be dictating rather than the Govt, i think the real crisis is probably less than 12 months away now (real crisis as in far bigger than Lehmans which was a mere warning, just like N Crock was an even smaller warning)

2) Its not really an unintended consequence, it is an inevitable consequence, there will likely be more than twice the number of jobs lost in the private sector than the public sector over the next 5 years. The hardest hit will likely be the Finance sector which is likely to shrink to about a third of its current size ultimately

3) As highlighted there is not enough time for careful consideration, they may have a year but i doubt its enough, The only way to exit this mess in an orderly fashion would have been to start years ago. Unfortunately rather than seeing the mess it was perceived to be a new paradigm which has led to even more malinvestment in the years they should have been sorting it

Edited by Tamara De Lempicka

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1 The govt is running out of being given the right to determine the time and location of cuts. If they wanted that luxury then they should have started in 2005 or before, Ultimately it looks to me that at somepoint within the next two years the markets will will be dictating rather than the Govt, i think the real crisis is probably less than 12 months away now (real crisis as in far bigger than Lehmans which was a mere warning, just like N Crock was an even smaller warning)

2) Its not really an unintended consequence, it is an inevitable consequence, there will likely be more than twice the number of jobs lost in the private sector than the public sector over the next 5 years. The hardest hit will likely be the Finance sector which is likely to shrink to about a third of its current size ultimately

3) As highlighted there is not enough time for careful consideration, they may have a year but i doubt its enough, The only way to exit this mess in an orderly fashion would have been to start years ago. Unfortunately rather than seeing the mess it was perceived to be a new paradigm which has led to even more malinvestment in the years they should have been sorting it

4) We're fecked. People need to realise that no one will be insulated from this, even the private sector I'm alright jacks. There's no getting around the fact that the end game of this deficit reduction, is millions upon millions on the dole. No mythical free market will save them.

We can't afford any more time sure, but we can't afford to get these next 12 months wrong either.

Edited by PopGun

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4) We're fecked. People need to realise that no one will be insulated from this, even the private sector I'm alright jacks. There's no getting around the fact that the end game of this deficit reduction, is millions upon millions on the dole. No mythical free market will save them.

I just went in to sign on. Staff outnumbered claimants at least three to one. Most were just fiddling with pens.

Oh, and mine was the only English surname I heard called.

Edited by Tonkers

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I just went in to sign on. Staff outnumbered claimants at least three to one. Most were just fiddling with pens.

Oh, and mine was the only English surname I heard called.

pre-emptive resourcing ;)

How long until the job centres are shut down?

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If the recent strikes are anything to go by, nobody will notice them missing!

Certainly made my trip to work quicker in the morning with less traffic on the road !

Well, let's hope the power workers go on strile, and you bl00dy well will notice!

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Guest absolutezero

I see your sabbatical hasnt reduced the level of tosh you post. Unless the business is a monopoly, the customer decides whether businesses fail or not. If they dont like the product the business goes under. If it was down to businesses only ever buying cheap imported tat wed still have Woolworths. Tesco, Sainsbury, grocer it is customers who decide to shop at Tesco and Sainsbury for conveniance so once again you talk rubbish, nobody has forced this other than customers, many local grocers have shut because customers preferred Tesco, if they didnt then the local grocers would clearly be thriving , unless your tescos is unique in kidnapping customers at gunpoint.

If its down to what business wants rather than customers im struggling to see how there have just seen a record number of retail insolvencies when they have all been exploiting cheap labour

and if Tesco only care about maximum profit how does that translate in them not being fussed if potential customers go to Saisbury. Your arguments retain AZ consistency

If we weren't talking about BIG business I would agree with you.

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Guest absolutezero

No that cant happen. Az is an expert on retail competition (he has unparalleled experience of it sitting in a class room teaching physics) and its effects and causes, you are lying it doesnt matter what the customer wants, if they start shopping in local grocers, Morrisons will kidnap them and force them into their shop

If you realised how stupidly childish that makes you sound....

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Guest absolutezero

Cuts are needed, however:

1. Government need to be aware of timing and locations of the pruning, we can't afford the same mistakes of Thatcher

2. Be ready for massive private sector bankruptcies and redundancies in the wake of public sector cuts. Unintended consequences and all that.

3. Before cutting NHS/Police/School admin & bureaucracy, make sure you remove the requirements that created the need for such work in the first place. Things will get very messy very quickly without this careful consideration beforehand. A simplistic notion that many still refuse to recognise on this board.

I'll be interested to see how many on here get the sack as a result of public sector spending cuts affecting the private sector.

I'm hoping the first one on the receiving end is one of the rabid Tories who keep banging on about cuts being necessary.

Unintended consequences and all that. ;)

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2) Its not really an unintended consequence, it is an inevitable consequence, there will likely be more than twice the number of jobs lost in the private sector than the public sector over the next 5 years. The hardest hit will likely be the Finance sector which is likely to shrink to about a third of its current size ultimately

No idea about the proportions, but I got an email from a square miler yesterday who reckons big regulatory proposals coming in two months will lead to an employment implosion in investment banking.

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With the government due to slash spending, over the coming months huge swathes of the public sector will be forced to make cuts.

I fear we are about to see knee-jerk reactions from trades unions calling for strikes. Are we about to see petty minded shop-stewards calling out their members, seventies style, to protest at the wrong people?

It's no good strikers forming picket lines, waving placards and chanting slogans outside their place of employment; the cuts are coming and that's that. Unionists would serve their members best by telling them who's really to blame for the economic crises - the bankers - so they can channel their anger in the most constructive way - in London.

I think the wind is beginning to change direction. People are realizing we are in an enormous mess and I think anyone planning on striking - in the public sector - will find that every time they face the cameras they will be asked 'where on earth do you think the money is going to come from?'

No, I think most people are in a mood to take their medicene. Public sector idiot trade union leaders will soon find they are out of sync with the public mood.

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I am very biased about this subject because I genuinely believe that the last thing the big public sector unions actually do is represent and defend medium to low paid public sector workers.

In my view, public sector union behaviour has been horrendous in the last ten years; union executives have been far more concerned about advancing political ideologies in the national arena than actually working for their members. So they've done next to nothing about abuse of employment law and precarity, bullying, illegal practices (line managers giving bad references, for example), physical security, employment conditions, favoritism, and discrimination, but they will pump thousands into telling members not to vote for UKIP and bring out the big guns when it comes to redundancy packages for the highly paid.

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I'll be interested to see how many on here get the sack as a result of public sector spending cuts affecting the private sector.

I'm hoping the first one on the receiving end is one of the rabid Tories who keep banging on about cuts being necessary.

Unintended consequences and all that. ;)

anyone exposed to cuts directly or indirectly should have an alternative strategy,

I don't think you have to be a rabid Tory to realise if the gov't doesn't do anything it'll go broke,. we'll lose our AAA credit rating and the whole process will speed up

Bit of a tightrope really but it has to be walked

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I'll be interested to see how many on here get the sack as a result of public sector spending cuts affecting the private sector.

I'm hoping the first one on the receiving end is one of the rabid Tories who keep banging on about cuts being necessary.

Unintended consequences and all that. ;)

Have you just arrived here from the 1970's via a rift in space time by any chance?

You're thinking is about 40 years out of date and it wasn't even right then.

:)

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Cuts are needed, however:

1. Government need to be aware of timing and locations of the pruning, we can't afford the same mistakes of Thatcher

2. Be ready for massive private sector bankruptcies and redundancies in the wake of public sector cuts. Unintended consequences and all that.

3. Before cutting NHS/Police/School admin & bureaucracy, make sure you remove the requirements that created the need for such work in the first place. Things will get very messy very quickly without this careful consideration beforehand. A simplistic notion that many still refuse to recognise on this board.

I agree very much with your third point and its one I used to make here to universal head scratching, perhaps I didn't explain it very well. The issue at stake is this, cutting spending is fine, most people will in abstract support it. Removing the requirements put upon those organisations is the old third rail of the Daily Mail mentality. It is the correct and necessary thing to do but you just know within days they'll find some sort of photogenic and emotive sob story. Its not unrelated to the waste and bloat narrative they are pushing quite hard at the moment. Sooner or later it would be honest and I think in the long term actually much wiser to just say we can't afford some things. Yes, care for the elderly is nice, we can't afford it, sorry. Instead of pretending some care assistant on the minimum wage is the problem because they aren't cheaper (the reductio ad absurdum being obvious). Its only the same logic as claiming Tesco are profiteers because they won't give me food for whatever I feel like paying them.

Edited by Cogs

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I see your sabbatical hasnt reduced the level of tosh you post. Unless the business is a monopoly, the customer decides whether businesses fail or not. If they dont like the product the business goes under. If it was down to businesses only ever buying cheap imported tat wed still have Woolworths. Tesco, Sainsbury, grocer it is customers who decide to shop at Tesco and Sainsbury for conveniance so once again you talk rubbish, nobody has forced this other than customers, many local grocers have shut because customers preferred Tesco, if they didnt then the local grocers would clearly be thriving , unless your tescos is unique in kidnapping customers at gunpoint.

If its down to what business wants rather than customers im struggling to see how there have just seen a record number of retail insolvencies when they have all been exploiting cheap labour

and if Tesco only care about maximum profit how does that translate in them not being fussed if potential customers go to Saisbury. Your arguments retain AZ consistency

Idiot - you haven't got a clue!

Supermarkets use their huge buying and bargaining power to undercut shops in the area till a load go under!

They can support this for as long as it takes from revenues from other supermarkets in other areas!

They need to be carved up into county-wide chunks, coz like the banks they have completely overtaken our country - even more so where they keep expanding into more areas outside of normal household/food-stuffs!

Their monopoly type status then leads to high-price-fixing between the big 5 to maximise their profits, once they get rid of their local competition!

B&Q and loads of other multistore-operators operate like this, in that they now charge the maximum they can get away with in a defined area!

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Guest absolutezero

I am very biased about this subject because I genuinely believe that the last thing the big public sector unions actually do is represent and defend medium to low paid public sector workers.

For the bigwigs up the top you're probably right.

The local secretaries and local meetings are more about defending the workers.

In my view, public sector union behaviour has been horrendous in the last ten years; union executives have been far more concerned about advancing political ideologies in the national arena than actually working for their members. So they've done next to nothing about abuse of employment law and precarity, bullying, illegal practices (line managers giving bad references, for example), physical security, employment conditions, favoritism, and discrimination, but they will pump thousands into telling members not to vote for UKIP and bring out the big guns when it comes to redundancy packages for the highly paid.

The political fund is an extra fee on top of union subs especially ring-fenced for political purposes.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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