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Student Doss Houses

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Looking on Property Bee on a daily basis, i`ve noticed an absolute flood of multi bedroom student houses come to market, in the past few weeks, here in Plymouth. Whats interesting, is that they are not selling, whereas in the past,not many were put on market.Those that were, sold immediately.I think there are a number of reasons for this. Firstly, a large purpose built accommodation unit is being built. Also, the threat of higher tuition fees are forcing students to stay at home. Then there is the CGT threat and changes to the HMO legislation Finally,there is the University cutbacks, with many "Mickey Mouse" courses being ditched. Anyone for a couple of 8 bed Victorian terraced houses. Much cheapness.

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Looking on Property Bee on a daily basis, i`ve noticed an absolute flood of multi bedroom student houses come to market, in the past few weeks, here in Plymouth. Whats interesting, is that they are not selling, whereas in the past,not many were put on market.Those that were, sold immediately.I think there are a number of reasons for this. Firstly, a large purpose built accommodation unit is being built. Also, the threat of higher tuition fees are forcing students to stay at home. Then there is the CGT threat and changes to the HMO legislation Finally,there is the University cutbacks, with many "Mickey Mouse" courses being ditched. Anyone for a couple of 8 bed Victorian terraced houses. Much cheapness.

Saturated market for student rentals in Plymouth probably, I wonder if some of the new mega tower blocks proposed for the City Centre will ever get built / completed.

Guess some landlords struggled last year and see no upside for holding on to property.

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Big cuts for education = reduced number of students

Plus the rules on HMO have become a lot stricter of late, plus... and here the biggie... there is talk of increase student loan interest rates and university fees.

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Britain does not need such a high percentage of young people with university education, especially considering that 90% of the courses offered today are complete and utter crap, producing nothing other than state approved rubber stamped civil service entrance critical bog roll 'degree'.

This is the legacy of the last two governments, being Tory and Labour... a society of stupid people with grandiose levels of self entitlement.

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Britain does not need such a high percentage of young people with university education, especially considering that 90% of the courses offered today are complete and utter crap, producing nothing other than state approved rubber stamped civil service entrance critical bog roll 'degree'.

This is the legacy of the last two governments, being Tory and Labour... a society of stupid people with grandiose levels of self entitlement.

...but, but it keeps people employed and people off the unemployment list.......university is good for some but not everyone, in fact I would say it is detrimental for some, vital time lost in a system they will never benefit from. ;)

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Britain does not need such a high percentage of young people with university education, especially considering that 90% of the courses offered today are complete and utter crap, producing nothing other than state approved rubber stamped civil service entrance critical bog roll 'degree'.

This is the legacy of the last two governments, being Tory and Labour... a society of stupid people with grandiose levels of self entitlement.

If we are going to run the economy as a periodic real estate based, ponzi / privilege mountain ; which we seem to want to; then there isn't much need for any education at all. Perhaps some people could do special courses if they wanted to learn to tie their shoe laces.

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Britain does not need such a high percentage of young people with university education, especially considering that 90% of the courses offered today are complete and utter crap, producing nothing other than state approved rubber stamped civil service entrance critical bog roll 'degree'.

This is the legacy of the last two governments, being Tory and Labour... a society of stupid people with grandiose levels of self entitlement.

Mass higher education is a trend that has been accelerating throughout the West. It seems that the floodgates might be closing though, if governments can no longer subsidise the cost of the degrees. Financial retrenchment in the face of monetary oblivion et al.

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Problem is that in many cities the student population displaced the local population (ok it was the buy-to-let brigade who did it). IMO the local community was often destroyed. We're going to see some really bad ghettoes if the students disappear.

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Looking on Property Bee on a daily basis, i`ve noticed an absolute flood of multi bedroom student houses come to market, in the past few weeks, here in Plymouth. Whats interesting, is that they are not selling, whereas in the past,not many were put on market.Those that were, sold immediately.I think there are a number of reasons for this. Firstly, a large purpose built accommodation unit is being built. Also, the threat of higher tuition fees are forcing students to stay at home. Then there is the CGT threat and changes to the HMO legislation Finally,there is the University cutbacks, with many "Mickey Mouse" courses being ditched. Anyone for a couple of 8 bed Victorian terraced houses. Much cheapness.

Interesting.

I keep an eye on Plimuff property via RSS feed, but that's limited to max 4-beds, to exclude far-too-big houses. Some student houses show up in that, but not such huge numbers. But I guess that could be why places with a room described as "dining room/bedroom N" are looking cheap.

One would have thought a city with a mickey-mouse university like Plimuff would be getting the worst of any decline. Yet rents in the city appear to be holding up rather high, including in central areas like St Judes where prices to buy are dirt cheap. Ten miles out of town you pay twice as much to buy, but pay 30% less to rent!

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Seems to be an oversupply of accomodation aimed at students here in Bournemouth too.

In addition to reasons metioned above, in particular proposed regulations for Houses of Multiple Occupation,

I think a major reason here is that the local education firm is expanding it's business verticaly.

They have recently built another couple of high rise halls of residence, containing an additional couple of hundred

student pods.

I think they have wised wised up to the fact that they have been leaving the most lucrative business to local landlords.

Having done the tricky business of providing the attraction, they now want the low hanging fruit of student accommodation.

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Admittedly, my example is Stoke on Trent, but look here:

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/find.html?locationIdentifier=POSTCODE%5E1601242&sortByPriceDescending=false&radius=1.0

Within 1 mile of the university, there are places going for 30K. I've never seen them this cheap this far South. They'd all be ex-student digs I suppose as there's a huge population in Stoke.

Edited by AvidFan

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I think a lot depends on the perceived quality of the local "Uni".

The towns with one or more "proper" universities will probably maintain their student numbers, the ones with a third-rate former college of bricklaying and hairdressing might lose numbers, because their "students" are the ones who are probably losing overall by racking up 3 years of debt for a mediocre degree.....

If these new HMO rules stay, then the existing big houses that already have the HMO permission could become more valuable because it will become harder to create new ones, if the local council can actually turn people down for planning permission.

Up until this new law, you had to meet the fire safety rules and so forth, but provided that you did so, the council couldn't actually refuse you permission to use a house as an HMO.

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I think they have wised wised up to the fact that they have been leaving the most lucrative business to local landlords.

Having done the tricky business of providing the attraction, they now want the low hanging fruit of student accommodation.

Which is far better than letting a parasite landlord siphon value out of the provision of education by sitting on locations around universities

Extending the concept slightly further : If the value of local services is embedded the price of fixed things like housing, why not have people pay for government services when they pay the price of housing?

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I think a lot depends on the perceived quality of the local "Uni".

The towns with one or more "proper" universities will probably maintain their student numbers, the ones with a third-rate former college of bricklaying and hairdressing might lose numbers, because their "students" are the ones who are probably losing overall by racking up 3 years of debt for a mediocre degree.....

20 Russell Group universities, presumably the odd oasis elsewhere, how many also-rans and no-hopers? I would certainly discourage any youngster I care about from going anywhere outside the Russell Group, unless they could demonstrate a very strong motivation for their choice.

It's deeply unfair on young people who lack the life experience to make anything better than a misinformed decision. There must be potential for a bubble to burst when meeja sentiment turns to widespread graduate hardship and watered-down life chances.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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