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Vince Cable Told Gordon Brown He Did Not Want To...


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...wow ...he's not on your Christmas card list..... :rolleyes:

It was a truly awful moment in a highly regrettable decade.

How anything which self-identifies as "human" could use their knowledge of the banking system, their awareness of the rift between the BOE and the Treasury, and then take this knowledge and pressure the Government - through the press - into a truly suicidal deal designed to blow up from the outset I will never be able to reconcile myself with.

At least Goldman mostly* restricted their looting to private-sector counterparties.

This man swapped the nation's cash for his own political gold.

(* modulo state agency debt, and... hmm, probably a poor comparison)

Edited by ParticleMan
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Poor vince, i can imagine him sitting at home, brooding over an alliance with Debt supremo brown or city fanboy osborne.

Rock and a hard place come to mind.

Still dont see how anyone, no matter how anti-tory, could ever, in clear conscience, side with a madman like Brown though. I guess thats ultimately why we have a Lib-con coalition.

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Yes but there isn't enough slack in the system anymore to hold back talent because it's from the wrong side of the tracks.

I reckon people are crying out for the genuinely capable.

The suggestion some chinless wonder will obtain preferment over some likely lad that can get stuff done just because said chinless went to the right school is a generation out of date.

But what is genuinely disappointing is what little talent seems to be coming from the proletariat.

Even Shane MacGowan went to the same school as Nick Clegg.

It was a generation out of date when the Grammar Schools existed across the country . Unfortunately, public school boy and supposed socialist Antony Crosland did for them in 1967. Now there is no true meritocratic route to the top in the educational system because the Comprehensive schools are essentially just reflections of the economic areas in which they reside. To get into a decent one you normally have to be wealthy enough to buy a property in the right area. This is why there is so little talent emerging from the proletariat. The current education system guarantees that those from poor backgrounds will struggle to succeed even if they have ability.

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....for Nulabour he appears to have been a talented guy...wonder what Brown had over him ...he was real competition for the moody man and seems to have left in a hurry....?..... :rolleyes:

The continuance of inequality of opportunity under a Labour government was a truth that dare not speak its name.

The problem is that the Labour Party has essentially become a machine for enabling certain members of the elite (often private school and Oxbridge educated) to get into power at the expense of other members of the same elite in a different party. Like the late Roman republic politics has been reduced to a squabble about the top jobs amongst a tiny social., political and economic class. The party names are just the banners they compete under. The Labour Party's original function as a campaigning political entity to get the poor out of poverty has largely been forgotten. Indeed, if true social mobility was to occur and the poor were to aspire to better things then the party would lose its voting constituency and the aforementioned members of the political class would no longer be able to use it as a route to power.

Keir Hardie must have spent so much time rolling in his grave over the past 13 years that he must have virtually burrowed to Australia

Edited by realcrookswearsuits
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"Now there is no true meritocratic route to the top in the educational system ..."

I'm not sure that is quite correct when more people get a university education than ever before.

If there is space for adolescent wasters (I was one of them) to get a degree in tourism or needlework or whatever it is that gives you your Bachelors these days, then I suspect that the kids that really want to break out of poverty can, like Ian Fleming's great grandfather did.

I don't think it's harder now than then.

And if the proletariat let some bourgeois socialist called Crosland wreck the education system for them .... I mean please ,,, they were never going to achieve anything anyway if they were going to let something as limp as that fark for them.

Edited by indirectapproach
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"Now there is no true meritocratic route to the top in the educational system ..."

I'm not sure that is quite correct when more people get a university education than ever before.

If there is space for adolescent wasters (I was one of them) to get a degree in tourism or needlework or whatever it is that gives you your Bachelors these days, then I suspect that the kids that really want to break out of poverty can, like Ian Fleming's great grandfather did.

I don't think it's harder now than then.

And if the proletariat let some bourgeois socialist called Crosland wreck the education system for them .... I mean please ,,, they were never going to achieve anything anyway if they were going to let something as limp as that fark for them.

...which did you do ...tourism or needlework....?.... :rolleyes:

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The continuance of inequality of opportunity under a Labour government was a truth that dare not speak its name.

The problem is that the Labour Party has essentially become a machine for enabling certain members of the elite (often private school and Oxbridge educated) to get into power at the expense of other members of the same elite in a different party. Like the late Roman republic politics has been reduced to a squabble about the top jobs amongst a tiny social., political and economic class. The party names are just the banners they compete under. The Labour Party's original function as a campaigning political entity to get the poor out of poverty has largely been forgotten. Indeed, if true social mobility was to occur and the poor were to aspire to better things then the party would lose its voting constituency and the aforementioned members of the political class would no longer be able to use it as a route to power.

Keir Hardie must have spent so much time rolling in his grave over the past 13 years that he must have virtually burrowed to Australia

...Ed Balls , Harriet H and the Millibands ...say it all..... :rolleyes:

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".which did you do ...tourism or needlework....?..."

Wasted too much time enjoying myself to graduate in either of those two noble disciplines.

..tourism is certainly noble ....the more tourists we attract with the current weak currency rate and their spend the better our balance of payments will get ....they are exporters ......this we need..... :rolleyes:

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"Now there is no true meritocratic route to the top in the educational system ..."

I'm not sure that is quite correct when more people get a university education than ever before.

If there is space for adolescent wasters (I was one of them) to get a degree in tourism or needlework or whatever it is that gives you your Bachelors these days, then I suspect that the kids that really want to break out of poverty can, like Ian Fleming's great grandfather did.

I don't think it's harder now than then.

And if the proletariat let some bourgeois socialist called Crosland wreck the education system for them .... I mean please ,,, they were never going to achieve anything anyway if they were going to let something as limp as that fark for them.

Since the introduction of tution fees education has started to become unaffordable for the poorest sections of society without burdening themselves with crippling levels of debt (assuming credit will be available in the future which is far from certain)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1190980/Too-poor-university-Tuition-fees-putting-working-class-students.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2008/feb/14/highereducation.accesstouniversity

It is also probably going to be a major area for cuts from the incoming government.

Many of the new University places actually went to middle class kids from reasonably prosperous families who were a bit too thick to get into University when places were limited in the past

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Since the introduction of tution fees education has started to become unaffordable for the poorest sections of society without burdening themselves with crippling levels of debt (assuming credit will be available in the future which is far from certain)

....except in Scotland .....the recession has not hit there yet....Salmond just wants more.....!.... :rolleyes:

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It was a truly awful moment in a highly regrettable decade.

How anything which self-identifies as "human" could use their knowledge of the banking system, their awareness of the rift between the BOE and the Treasury, and then take this knowledge and pressure the Government - through the press - into a truly suicidal deal designed to blow up from the outset I will never be able to reconcile myself with.

Aren't you possibly overstating Cable's role? Gordon was going to bail NR anyway. And I can't remember too many MPs pushing to see the 'fundamentally sound' loan book.

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The chairman of the Lib Dems in Worcester quit yesterday, saying that he felt “betrayed” by the new Deputy Prime Minister. Alex Kear, a former councillor who has joined the Greens, said that his former party had “opted for a watered-down version to get themselves into power”.

I don't get this guy's motivation. It may be that it's just that he doesn't like Tories but, since he's quitting, there doesn't seem any reason for him not to be honest about his reasons. Assuming he's being straight then, why was he ever a member of a party that wanted PR? The central Lib-Dem policy is to have a political system where parties will always have to water down what they believe in so as to be able to gain power through a coalition of some sort. This is like someone leaving alcoholics anonymous because it's helping too many people to quit drinking. What we have now is eaxctly what you'd expect in a system with PR, a government where both parties in the ruling coalition have had to water themselves down a bit.

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Guest sillybear2

Since the introduction of tution fees education has started to become unaffordable for the poorest sections of society without burdening themselves with crippling levels of debt (assuming credit will be available in the future which is far from certain)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1190980/Too-poor-university-Tuition-fees-putting-working-class-students.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2008/feb/14/highereducation.accesstouniversity

It is also probably going to be a major area for cuts from the incoming government.

Many of the new University places actually went to middle class kids from reasonably prosperous families who were a bit too thick to get into University when places were limited in the past

Let us never forget the imposition of tuition fees on English students was only made possible thanks to the votes of Scottish Labour MP's.

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Let us never forget the imposition of tuition fees on English students was only made possible thanks to the votes of Scottish Labour MP's.

...and they call this democracy ....?....why does Cameron wish to fight for the Union ....England would be better separated from the "Union"...a bit like the Germans with the EU.....or he should have the constitution changed to deal with the West Lothian question.... :rolleyes:

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