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winkie

Radon Gas

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I have only recently come across radon, does anyone live in a home that is affected? What effect does it have on the value of the property and has anyone tried to get rid of it....sounds scary.

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I have only recently come across radon, does anyone live in a home that is affected? What effect does it have on the value of the property and has anyone tried to get rid of it....sounds scary.

Much of southwest England has it - along with radioactive rocks (go out on Dartmoor and you're getting radiation off-the-scale of what's permitted in the nuclear power industry).

Much more concerned about traffic fumes from the road, and carbon monoxide from the neighbour down the hill's defective fireplace.

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Guest Noodle

I have only recently come across radon, does anyone live in a home that is affected? What effect does it have on the value of the property and has anyone tried to get rid of it....sounds scary.

It comes from granite bedrock. Fear not, this is fairly easy to deal with.

First you need a radon test, no idea how much, but I can find out.

Then, if the radon levels (concentrations) are above the health guidelines for chronic exposure, so work needs doing under your floors.

Do you have concrete slab ground floors or timber joist and boards?

Typically, you pull up the boards and line the underside with either 1000 grade polythene sheet or if you are posh a more expensive geomembrane, like Cooper Clarke Geofin.

Then ventilate under the floor, between the boards and the liner with either an electric extraction fan or stack with wind driven extractor, exhaust to outside air.

Once complete, retest to show reduced exposure.

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Much of southwest England has it - along with radioactive rocks (go out on Dartmoor and you're getting radiation off-the-scale of what's permitted in the nuclear power industry).

Much more concerned about traffic fumes from the road, and carbon monoxide from the neighbour down the hill's defective fireplace.

Thanks porca miseria but can it really make you ill? from what you are saying it is not worth worrying about, so why do they make all the fuss about it when it is only a natural occurrence of nature?

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Guest Noodle

Thanks porca miseria but can it really make you ill? from what you are saying it is not worth worrying about, so why do they make all the fuss about it when it is only a natural occurrence of nature?

If my PC can work and I know your location, I can probably find out.

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If my PC can work and I know your location, I can probably find out.

Looked on the radon website they said 3 to 5%... I think I will just forget about it and live with it...worse things can happen at war. ;)

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Looked on the radon website they said 3 to 5%... I think I will just forget about it and live with it...worse things can happen at war. ;)

Probably best. It's a bigger con than asbestos and contaminated land.

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Probably best. It's a bigger con than asbestos and contaminated land.

is it a health and safety con.....has anyone died from radon gas poisoning?

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The truth is that it can do you harm and can theoretically kill you. Ionising radiation is the thing which is most widely considered to cause cancer. In the UK, 50% of the ionising radiation an 'average' person will experience will be from radon gas. Comparatively speaking, human nuclear activities are zero in comparison. Cancer is not the only reason you would need to worry about radon.

So if it is just you then, by all means, ignore it. However I would not be willing to leave any risk had I a family who would be subjected to it. I should also note that I am a scientist and much of my research has been into the effects of ionising radiation in DNA.... typically I will down play the risks of typical public concens but this is one area where the public underestimate the danger. Not everything human is bad and not everything natural is good!

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Guest Noodle

is it a health and safety con.....has anyone died from radon gas poisoning?

It's a chronic exposure increased risk of lung cancer thing. Can't remember is it's a propagator or initiator. Not my specialty radon.

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What are the implementations of what? As a weapon? Defenses against it? Earthquake prediction?

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The truth is that it can do you harm and can theoretically kill you. Ionising radiation is the thing which is most widely considered to cause cancer. In the UK, 50% of the ionising radiation an 'average' person will experience will be from radon gas. Comparatively speaking, human nuclear activities are zero in comparison. Cancer is not the only reason you would need to worry about radon.

So if it is just you then, by all means, ignore it. However I would not be willing to leave any risk had I a family who would be subjected to it. I should also note that I am a scientist and much of my research has been into the effects of ionising radiation in DNA.... typically I will down play the risks of typical public concens but this is one area where the public underestimate the danger. Not everything human is bad and not everything natural is good!

You haven't exactly put my mind at rest...looking on the radon map most of Cornwall looks affected some areas 1 in 3 properties have high radon concentrates...move to the country to get away from city pollution and come across something more sinister. ;)

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What are the implementations of what? As a weapon? Defenses against it? Earthquake prediction?

Sorry to confuse you...implications...puter can't spell today. ;)

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It's just one of many environmental risks that increase our chances of cancer. Same applies to pollutants in our air and water, hours spent flying in the air and exposed to cosmic rays, exposure to the sun etc.

It's also a problem in some areas of the Far-East, again due to granite. Mind you, air conditioning is more common so this probably reduces the risk.

I think most people go with "what you don't know won't hurt you". Especially when it comes to running out of the office to holiday and getting burned/tanned. Interesting thing is, skin cancer isn't necessarilly totally linked to sun exposure. I believe there is a higher incidence among white collar office workers, could be due to any number of reasons.

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is it a health and safety con.....has anyone died from radon gas poisoning?

Yes

It's the biggest cause of lung cancer in the UK after smoking

Having said all that, there is a big difference between living in a "radon-affected area" - which includes even parts of Berks and Oxon - and having a radon-affected house

If you do live in a place where it's a real issue then you can have tests done and get grants towards remedial measures.

Talk to the Heath Protection Agency's radon people.

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So if it is just you then, by all means, ignore it. However I would not be willing to leave any risk had I a family who would be subjected to it. I should also note that I am a scientist and much of my research has been into the effects of ionising radiation in DNA.... typically I will down play the risks of typical public concens but this is one area where the public underestimate the danger. Not everything human is bad and not everything natural is good!

^This, in buckets

I'm similarly unconcerned about most of this stuff, but radon *is* a potential issue in the very small number of houses where the internal levels are very high.

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Guest Noodle

If you are bothered, it's so easy to fix with a roll of polythene or HDPE and a ventaxia type fan or two.

No biggie.

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is it a health and safety con.....has anyone died from radon gas poisoning?

Many lung cancer cases not attributed to smoking are attributed to chronic radon exposure

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It comes from granite bedrock. Fear not, this is fairly easy to deal with.

First you need a radon test, no idea how much, but I can find out.

Then, if the radon levels (concentrations) are above the health guidelines for chronic exposure, so work needs doing under your floors.

FWIW, I got a flyer about it from the local council's elfin safety. At the time I *was* choking on soot and carbon monoxide from a neighbour, and the focus on a far lesser (but trendy and hyped - 'cos of the radioactivity) issue seemed bitterly ironic.

AIUI it becomes more of an issue if you have a closed system, with lots of crap like modern draftproofing, so that what gets in doesn't get out. In that sort of case, I expect Noodle's advice applies. Less so if you have a healthy exchange of air with the outside world.

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FWIW, I got a flyer about it from the local council's elfin safety. At the time I *was* choking on soot and carbon monoxide from a neighbour, and the focus on a far lesser (but trendy and hyped - 'cos of the radioactivity) issue seemed bitterly ironic.

AIUI it becomes more of an issue if you have a closed system, with lots of crap like modern draftproofing, so that what gets in doesn't get out. In that sort of case, I expect Noodle's advice applies. Less so if you have a healthy exchange of air with the outside world.

Did you make a complaint ?- Section 79/80 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 has fairly robust provisions for dealing with Statutory Nuisances - of which smoke and soot can fall within.

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^This, in buckets

I'm similarly unconcerned about most of this stuff, but radon *is* a potential issue in the very small number of houses where the internal levels are very high.

I remember watching a documentary about Radon and in this house in the USA the exposure was estimated to be in the region of 600 cigarettes equivalent per day / or working in one of our pubs for 8 hours pre smoking ban :lol:

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Guest Noodle

Okay, everyone check the radon webpages and see if you're in a radon area.

Then DIY the plastic and fan thing. Remember Part P electrics cert for the fan.

Glad I can do all this myself here without hassle.

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Yes

It's the biggest cause of lung cancer in the UK after smoking

Having said all that, there is a big difference between living in a "radon-affected area" - which includes even parts of Berks and Oxon - and having a radon-affected house

If you do live in a place where it's a real issue then you can have tests done and get grants towards remedial measures.

Talk to the Heath Protection Agency's radon people.

Found out that you can test a house for radon takes 3 months plus a couple to get the results back.

If you are bothered, it's so easy to fix with a roll of polythene or HDPE and a ventaxia type fan or two.

No biggie.

Noodle...you are sooo laid back. ;)

Okay, everyone check the radon webpages and see if you're in a radon area.

Then DIY the plastic and fan thing. Remember Part P electrics cert for the fan.

Glad I can do all this myself here without hassle.

Oxford is a high risk area...you can check for yourself £3 =VAT.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


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