Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest Elephant_In_The_Room

Joining A Union

Recommended Posts

Guest DestroyBrown

Your opinions please.

Have you ever needed to use them? and if so, did they achieve anything for you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest X-QUORK

Your opinions please.

Have you ever needed to use them? and if so, did they achieve anything for you?

I joined one when I was an employee at a large Corporate which had a habit of expanding and contracting every couple of years. At first we didn't have enough members to force recognition, but we got there eventually. I would say it helped to have someone on your side in terms of employment law, as well as arranging various financial packages on the cheap for members...but I was fortunate enough to not need them "in anger" as it were.

I suspect the company behaved a little better once it knew it had an organised workforce to contend with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your opinions please.

Have you ever needed to use them? and if so, did they achieve anything for you?

This depends on your job and the union.

I work in IT.... there are no strong IT unions..... I was briefly unionised for a year or so under a Transport Union, made absolutely no difference as it happens (never needed to call on them) and probably wouldn't have done even if I needed to as approximately 0 other people in my office were also unionised.

OTOH.... the wife is a teacher.... their union kicks serious ar*e because almost every teacher is a member of one or t'other union. Consequently she gets very heavy duty backup in any work related issues with management and, frankly, management are terrified of doing anything that might make the union angry. So for her it's very definitely worth it. I'd say she and other teachers have much higher pay, and are very well protected from being dicked with by management unfairly.

You can see that with the TLA's (thats the Teaching and Learning Assistants) who do a similar job, with the same management but are almost entirely un-unionised, and consequently management constantly lean on them for free extra hours, extra duties, extra responsibilities, lower pay and so on in a way they wouldn' DREAM of doing with the unionised teachers. As a consequence of not being unionised they get royally screwed in a way the teachers do not time and time again. (the teachers, frankly, can;t understand why they don;t join unions but the TLA's seem to just not bother).

I'd think of it as an insurance contract against being shafted by your boss..... with the proviso that in some cricumstances/unions it is an insurance contract with a high premium but little real payout/protection in the event you are dicked with...... and in other circumstances/unions it is an insurance contract with a low premium with MASSIVE payouts in the event you are dicked with.

You have to find out which of the two situations you are in.

Yours,

TGP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are good as backup, if you are going into a disciplinary hearing for being late or lazy with expenses

they will come into the meeting with you, mine was on the same floor so she just came across and offered

to help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm considering joining up too. My job will become extinct within ten years. I'll probably be offered retraining, but you never know. They are actively looking for victims right now. However I have the most spotless record, so I feel fairly safe.

Companies are generally ruthless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This depends on your job and the union.

I work in IT.... there are no strong IT unions..... I was briefly unionised for a year or so under a Transport Union, made absolutely no difference as it happens (never needed to call on them) and probably wouldn't have done even if I needed to as approximately 0 other people in my office were also unionised.

OTOH.... the wife is a teacher.... their union kicks serious ar*e because almost every teacher is a member of one or t'other union. Consequently she gets very heavy duty backup in any work related issues with management and, frankly, management are terrified of doing anything that might make the union angry. So for her it's very definitely worth it. I'd say she and other teachers have much higher pay, and are very well protected from being dicked with by management unfairly.

You can see that with the TLA's (thats the Teaching and Learning Assistants) who do a similar job, with the same management but are almost entirely un-unionised, and consequently management constantly lean on them for free extra hours, extra duties, extra responsibilities, lower pay and so on in a way they wouldn' DREAM of doing with the unionised teachers. As a consequence of not being unionised they get royally screwed in a way the teachers do not time and time again. (the teachers, frankly, can;t understand why they don;t join unions but the TLA's seem to just not bother).

I'd think of it as an insurance contract against being shafted by your boss..... with the proviso that in some cricumstances/unions it is an insurance contract with a high premium but little real payout/protection in the event you are dicked with...... and in other circumstances/unions it is an insurance contract with a low premium with MASSIVE payouts in the event you are dicked with.

You have to find out which of the two situations you are in.

Yours,

TGP

Good post, and of course, in teaching you have the ever present danger of spurious accusations by malicious pupils.

Yes, unions are in general a good thing even if it's only as a source of advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your opinions please.

Have you ever needed to use them? and if so, did they achieve anything for you?

TGP makes excellent points, both about the nature of your workplace determining how useful a union is, and about its function as an insurance policy.

I didn't think I needed a union so didn't join one. After difficulties with a psychotic boss, then finding the company would rather hang me out to dry than deal with him, I had to pay my own legal fees; - the matter was resolved in my favour but it was extremely stressful, isolating and costly. The first thing I did afterwards was to join a union and now I know that situation cannot arise again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well worth every penny. You need the protection if you work in anything that involves the general public (nb. this is why public sector workers are so likely to be union members) because if you get accused of something, chances are your employer will turns its back and you and leave you for the wolves. Essential in my view. As to "what have the unions ever done for us", well amongst other things they built the primary school I went to and the library I used growing up. Interesting idea isn't it, communities helping themselves and running schools and other services... apparently David Cameron thought it up six months ago ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The extent to which this is worthwhile depends on two factors:

1. How 'irreplaceable' (or, in reality, difficult to replace) are you in your job?

2. What level of threat do you face to your working conditions, pay, and/or job security?

If you're a tube driver and a three-year pay freeze has just been announced, then belonging to a union is a no-brainer. Going on strike would inflict serious and immediate pain on a lot of people, and you cannot easily be replaced, because there aren't that many people in the job market who hold a driving licence for tube trains. On the other hand, if you work behind the counter in McDonald's and have just received an inflation busting pay rise, your bargaining position is weaker to put it mildly, and that tenner a month in union dues probably isn't going to get you very much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find it worth it mainly for the free recourse to legal advice and a huge wealth of knowledge - stay clear of any militant activist types .

A rule of thumb I alswys employ is if a guy introduces himself as a union 'rep' give him a chance - if its 'activist' or worse 'official' run like feck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Complete and utter waste of money in my opinion and more importantly experience.

I was a member of Unison from 1997 to 2008. When I got made redundant at the end of 2008 I approached the Union about taking an unfair dismissal case. I completed all the paper work and it was sent off to their shyster Lawyers - Thomsons.

Anyway to cut a long story short - they determined the dismissal was fair - along with that of numerous other redundancies.

So I pursued the case myself - and also represented one of the admin staff who was also made redundant (and blatantly unfairly)

To cut to the chase - we won despite the Local Authority throwing £40K in legal expenses (we got the exact figure through an FOI :lol: ) by self representing at the Tribunal. Over 21K in compo awarded and I got to grill the HR witches and my former boss over a 4 day hearing (worth it just for that ;) )

My advice - save your money, invest it in a copy of Tolly's employment law and read your employers procedures carefully<_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find it worth it mainly for the free recourse to legal advice and a huge wealth of knowledge - stay clear of any militant activist types .

A rule of thumb I alswys employ is if a guy introduces himself as a union 'rep' give him a chance - if its 'activist' or worse 'official' run like feck

In LG in the 1990's NALGO become so single issue it was routinely referred to as NOWGAY. At which point a lot of members left and joined the GMB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest absolutezero

Your opinions please.

Have you ever needed to use them? and if so, did they achieve anything for you?

All depends on your local secretary.

If you've got a good one they are worth their weight in gold.

Get a crap one and you're buggered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's worth it. Can't say any more for legal reasons. Hopefully in two or three months I can explain more fully once some ongoing business is over and done with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.