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You're Sacked, You're Sacked, You're Sacked!

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Guest growl

You're Sacked, You're Sacked, You're Sacked!

The words of a union official regarding the bad behaviour or managers.

Just been listening to sky news regarding the catering company and BA.

Also news of a strike going into play at Rolls Royce this time because of the sacking of a Union official.

Is this the beginning of a new era of major job losses, strike action and discontent?

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You're Sacked, You're Sacked, You're Sacked!

The words of a union official regarding the bad behaviour or managers.

Just been listening to sky news regarding the catering company and BA.

Also news of a strike going into play at Rolls Royce this time because of the sacking of a Union official.

Is this the beginning of a new era of major job losses, strike action and discontent?

In a word, Yes.

I feel quite sorry for BA in this, its the other company that are running a loss, and BA are made out to be the bad guys in this. Dont know why they just dont go back and do their own catering; bet first class food standards would increase tenfold.

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Guest growl
In a word, Yes. 

I feel quite sorry for BA in this, its the other company that are running a loss, and BA are made out to be the bad guys in this.  Dont know why they just dont go back and do their own catering; bet first class food standards would increase tenfold.

I agree BA and passengers suffered because of the bad management of another company.

But what about Rolls Royce. Their action is over the sacking of a Union official. Apparently strike action will affect their orders. They make engines for miltary aircraft.

What exactly did the official do?

Rotten pay and rotten conditions. I would have thought that most of this was covered by the law now. But bullying in the workplace and sackings is a different thing. Is the downturn in the economy effecting performance at work eg. managers forcing more out of their workers. Is the stress causing managers and union officials into making bad decisions. Lack of communication, a stressful environment to work?

People get angry when their jobs are at risk, when a company makes a loss.

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I agree BA and passengers suffered because of the bad management of another company.

But what about Rolls Royce. Their action is over the sacking of a Union official. Apparently strike action will affect their orders. They make engines for miltary aircraft.

What exactly did the official do?

Rotten pay and rotten conditions. I would have thought that most of this was covered by the law now. But bullying in the workplace and sackings is a different thing. Is the downturn in the economy effecting performance at work eg. managers forcing more out of their workers. Is the stress causing managers and union officials into making bad decisions. Lack of communication, a stressful environment to work?

People get angry when their jobs are at risk, when a company makes a loss.

I have to say, I don't have much sympathy for BA, it seems they put the pressure on their caterers to such an extent that their business was no longer viable... well guess what.. you force them to be so cheap they go out of business, well... shit... you end up with no food eh!? same thing seems to be happening to farmers at the hands of the supermarkets...

It seems to me that the managers are tightening to screws so tight that the workers have walked away.... there will be only so many patsies that are willing to work before the managers realise they actually have to pay decent wage to get a decent product.

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I read somewhere that at Rolls Royce the union official was trying to organise action over two night shift workers who were caught sleeping on the job and sacked. Don't know how much is true though.

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I read somewhere that at Rolls Royce the union official was trying to organise action over two night shift workers who were caught sleeping on the job and sacked. Don't know how much is true though.

My first action when I was promoted to Production Manager at a printing company in 1993 was to sack the night shift manager for sleeping. I was 27 and earning £35K pa

He was earning over £70K pa and had abused his position because of lax senior management who assumed any action against him would immediately lead to a walkout of all his union buddies. Not so - they were as pissed off as me because they were having to carry dead wood. They even supplied a video of him aslepp just in case it went nasty!

People want to work in a fair environment. Over strong unions are as bad as over bearing management. Too many union officials used to see the union as their career rather than the company who employed them.

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Guest Charlie The Tramp
My first action when I was promoted to Production Manager at a printing company in 1993 was to sack the night shift manager for sleeping. I was 27 and earning £35K pa. He was earning over £70K pa

A man who was earning enough per annum in 1993 which would buy a property for cash. :o and a salary of 35k at 27 was a b****y fortune then for the printing industry.

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A man who was earning enough per annum in 1993 which would buy a property for cash.  :o  and a salary of 35k at 27 was a b****y fortune then for the printing industry.

I did a building job in Fleet Street in 1980 and was there for a couple of years and drank in a pub with lots of guys 'on the print'. There was endless discussions about wages - in those days printers were earning £700 a week. It was a closed shop and jobs handed father to son sort of place.

Of course they all moved out to Wapping to break the power of the unions but, even so, there was a time when printing was well paid. Now it's coppers as fas as I can see.

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Industrial relations at Heathrow were notoriously bad for many, many years. It was commonplace and acceptable for handling staff to steal from baggage.

In many other countries airlines are held hostage by their staff, always a potential problem in transport industries.

BA has worked hard over many years to rebalance this relationship and as a result it has somehow survived. Obviously Gate Gourmet are not a blindingly good employer but they will soon be dealt with by the market. In the meantime anyone overly sympathetic to the employees should remember that the next time they spend hours on the web looking to trim £10 off the cost of their flight.

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In a word, Yes. 

I feel quite sorry for BA in this, its the other company that are running a loss, and BA are made out to be the bad guys in this.  Dont know why they just dont go back and do their own catering; bet first class food standards would increase tenfold.

I think Gate Gourmet was part of BA until it was spun off and then contracted back immediately to reduce costs to BA (liek a sale and leaseback of property). This was used as justification for the secondary strike as the GG employees were formally BA employees.

Edited by Scooter

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A man who was earning enough per annum in 1993 which would buy a property for cash.  :o  and a salary of 35k at 27 was a b****y fortune then for the printing industry.

"Sticky" labels used to be niche area of printing making huge profits selling to retailers.

I used to sell to the main buyers at Sainsburys and Waitrose. They had a budget of 1 - 2p per package for labelling. I used to ask them what they could afford and then quote 10% below. They were delighted. Our costs were about 20% of the eventual selling price. Delivering quality product on time was far more important than the price.

I was paid £35K to ensure that a turnover of £4 million produced £2 million profit.

Over paid? I don't think so. I was working 8:00am til midnight running 2 production sites. in 1992 I worked 354 days.

Still at least it meant I could buy a 1 bed flat in west London as a single person.

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It’s strange that in a country where we are told that we must not discriminate and that apparently immigrants only make up a few percent of the population and yet nearly 100% of the 600 workers are Gategourmet are non white.

I must just be a racist for pointing this out ………………. Even if it’s true

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It’s strange that in a country where we are told that we must not discriminate and that apparently immigrants only make up a few percent of the population and yet nearly 100% of the 600 workers are Gategourmet  are non white.

I must just be a racist for pointing this out ………………. Even if it’s true

It could just be that:

1) Gate gourmet are situated in area with large ethnic population

2) Indians have more self-respect than to sit on the dole when they could be working, even if they do only get a little more for their 40hr week than "our" generation of "can't be bovvvahhhed" useless articles get from the DHSS for nothing.

I notice the management are all rather pale.

Edited by Leodhasach

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Guest Charlie The Tramp
I did a building job in Fleet Street in 1980 and was there for a couple of years and drank in a pub with lots of guys 'on the print'. There was endless discussions about wages - in those days printers were earning £700 a week. It was a closed shop and jobs handed father to son sort of place.

I worked for the Evening Standard from 59 to 80 in distribution. It was the comps setting the hot metal, then replaced by computers, who were earning high wages, but I disagree with the £700. Someone was telling you porkies. The old print workers were a strange bunch.

Comps were paid by the number of pages they made up similiar to piece work.

Pagination in the fifties was small 28 to 32 pages and their wages were low in comparison to their skills . Their union tried to get their agreement changed to a basic wage which the NPA refused to agree to.

In the booming sixties pagination increased rapidly as advertising took off in a big way and newspapers grew to 56 and 64 pages and beyond. The comps then began reaping great benefit, and guess what the NPA wanted to pay a set wage.

This time the comps refused, hence the proprietors flight to Wapping.

With all the modern technology newspapers cannot produce at the speed of the old ways.

If you remember the London evening`s Saturday classified editions, matches finished at 4. 40pm and on the dot at 9 minutes past 5 the presses started to roll with the full results and reports of the matches.

The real days of newspapers. <_<

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The real days of newspapers.  <_<

Hear, hear.

But don't get me on that Charlie... the smell of the

printing ink and the hot metal, the page proofs

that stained most of me old jackets...

the late final racing out to the news stands at 6pm...

makes me feel very old.

A veritable newspaper dinosaur :(

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The way I understand it, BA have had to cut costs to prevent them from loss-making year-on-year. Gate Gormet are a firm that have consistently made a loss out of the BA monopoly on food supply. 20 million last year alone. So, what are BA expected to do? continue with said company, and cover their 20 million losses?

Or let the supplier know what they expect, as a service supplier on contract renewal, and see whether Gate Gormet want to proceed? Problem is, the employees know that Gate Gormet wants to drop them as much as BA do.

I personally would expect BA to drop the firm if they cannot maintain the required service, especially as they are in direct competition with Easyjet, Ryanair etc.. The BA management have more staff to worry about employing than a couple af caterers in the local area, sad but true. Lesser of two evils, simple as that.

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Guest Charlie The Tramp
Hear, hear.

But don't get me on that Charlie... the smell of the

printing ink and the hot metal, the page proofs

that stained most of me old jackets...

the late final racing out to the news stands at 6pm...

makes me feel very old. 

A veritable newspaper dinosaur  :(

Not many of us left, although I took redundancy in 1980 it`s still in my blood. :)

Edited by Charlie The Tramp

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Sometimes I think that a Union will pick a fight at the slightest excuse. Remember the London Underground drivers who were sacked for serious safety breaches? The Unions were straight in there provoking Industrial Action trying to get them re-instated. These safety breaches were so serious they could have led to loss of life and it wasn't the once it happened, they had a history of safety problems. But the Bolshie Unionist called a strike claiming the drivers were being victimised.

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  • 339 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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