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Scheherazade

Nows The Time To Buy A Mobile Home

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Was shopping in Wokingham town centre on Saturday & passed by an estate agents window - surprisingly half of the windows adverts were for mobile homes variously priced up to 180K.

Are the EA's now trying to push these as an alternative to bricks & morter?.

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Was shopping in Wokingham town centre on Saturday & passed by an estate agents window - surprisingly half of the windows adverts were for mobile homes variously priced up to 180K.     

Are the EA's now trying to push these as an alternative to bricks & morter?.

One of my mates lives in a mobile home. I think he pays £200 a month. I guess the only downside is it might get a bit cold in the winter.

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I didn't even think you could a mortgage on a mobile home??? unless the banks have changed the lending criteria.

yes it must get very cold in the winter, would have to dig out the old thermals.

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Was shopping in Wokingham town centre on Saturday & passed by an estate agents window - surprisingly half of the windows adverts were for mobile homes variously priced up to 180K.     

Are the EA's now trying to push these as an alternative to bricks & morter?.

Sadly that is not particularly true. See my post a few days ago about the Park Home Business.

In fact park homes and mobile homes represent even less value for money than bricks and mortar homes. Sure, the physical entity that is a "mobile" home can be relatively inexpensive, but the nightmare is siting one.

Almost all mobile homes which have any tangible security of tenure have a huge premium to be paid for that privelige. Telephone almost any site owner and he will not allow you to place your home on his site without you paying an enormous sum to do so....yet you do NOT own the site, merely a licence to use the plot. Usually the site owner will compel you to buy a mobile home already on site, with a premium (payable to either him or previous owner) of anywhere between £30k and £100k.

You can buy quite a respectable mobile home for as little as a few thousand quid but you will find hardly a single site in the whole of the UK on which you can place it, hence the extremely unhealthy alliance between mobile home manufacturers and site owners, who buy direct from the manufacturer and then charge the resident an enormous hike on the actual cost. In addition of course, the resident has to pay quite a hefty monthly ground rent, and service costs.

In some instances you can do a cheaper deal by investing in a so-called "holiday" mobile which cannot be lived in all year round. But this is not for maintenance or benign reasons. The site owner gets away with offering no security of tenure by declaring the site as a "holiday" category and restricting access to 11 months per year.

The whole Park Home rip off industry has been further corrupted by the large number of retired people with tons of equity but little grey matter who've cashed in, and for them the release of 300k spending money from a bricks and mortar home sold for 500k gives them a generous 200k to buy a sumptuous mobile home. These deals, in which the relatively high cash MEW'ing of the new owners leads to a certain lack of thought on their part, have resulted in an enormous inflation of mobile homes, to the point where they are no longer a viable alternative to bricks and mortar for cashed strapped buyers.

That explains (partly) the huge bias towards elderly and retired subscribers.

The whole business has become further exascerbated by the neglect and incompetence of local councils whose theoretical remit was to supply a reasonable number of "sites" on which mobile homes could be placed. Instead of administering these sites themselves, thereby providing what could be described as a social housing service, they have hived the majority of licences off to the private sector. All well and good in principle except that now mobile home sites have become just like everything else in this mad world, an opportunity for someone, somewhere, to make a quick buck.

But to make matters worse, some site owners are (almost unbelievably) strapped for cash because of the enormous costs in rates and other licence requirements.

Thus the apparent promise afforded by mobile homes and home parks as a cheap alternative to conventional homes has all but been obliterated. However I predict that a great many sites are going to go to the wall and if there is to be a general house price crash it will in the fullness of time hit the mobile sector even harder. That might then be the time to consider a mobile home.

VP

Edited by VacantPossession

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Sadly that is not particularly true. See my post a few days ago about the Park Home Business.

Thanks for your interesting post VP, I checked out your earlier thread too and really learned something.

It confirms my suspicion that the UK's planning laws appear to serve only the interests and income streams of a parasitical layer of bureaucrats, agents, landowners and private interests rather than actually provide housing and accomodation for people who live here.

Recently I've become a lot more sympathetic to travellers/gypsies for being the only group in the UK that actively challenges the planning laws.

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Thanks for your interesting post VP, I checked out your earlier thread too and really learned something.

It confirms my suspicion that the UK's planning laws appear to serve only the interests and income streams of a parasitical layer of bureaucrats, agents, landowners and private interests rather than actually provide housing and accomodation for people who live here.

Recently I've become a lot more sympathetic to travellers/gypsies for being the only group in the UK that actively challenges the planning laws.

If you look at the legislation controlling travellers and gypsies you'll see that many councils have been forced to cave in and provide sites for them, but though that might be seen by some as beneficial and by others as not a good thing, the point is that "ordinary", non-travelling people who in all other respects are part of conventional society but cannot afford a home are completely marginalised.

There is virtually no social housing left in the UK, no provision for those who can afford a mobile home easily but cannot afford the outrageous cost of siting them, and council planners have shut the door on anyone who wishes to be a resident of a mobile home, unless they choose the only option: a plot on a commercial site which had historical planning permission and therefore a licence, at the huge premium I mentioned in the first post.

VP

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  • 333 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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