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Samuel Whiskers

Help Me Please

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I live in a 1 bed flat in good part of west London with my wife. She bought in Q4 2001.

Have been trying to sell because we need somewhere bigger. Had an offer end of last year - fell through. Then another in March - fell through after two months, having taken it off the market - buyer did not have finance but EA's didn't bother to check on this beforehand.

Now we have changed EA and my wife has been convinced by them to increase the price by 10K.

Please can I have a little bit of feedback on this as she is very stubborn and will not listen to my pleas to move the price down rather than up.

I think that if we haven't got rid of it by the end of the year then we will have to rent it out.

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Depends where in West London, but the area of West London that I'm in the prices are only going one direction, and it's not up.

If you want to sell drop the price.

If you want the property to stick then keep it where it is.

Simple choice really.

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Guest growl
I live in a 1 bed flat in good part of west London with my wife. She bought in Q4 2001.

Have been trying to sell because we need somewhere bigger. Had an offer end of last year - fell through. Then another in March  - fell through after two months, having taken it off the market - buyer did not have finance but EA's didn't bother to check on this beforehand.

Now we have changed EA and my wife has been convinced by them to increase the price by 10K.

Please can I have a little bit of feedback on this as she is very stubborn and will not listen to my pleas to move the price down rather than up.

I think that if we haven't got rid of it by the end of the year then we will have to rent it out.

Am I correct in thinking that you can buy another place without having to sell. Since you say it is a one bedroom, I wondering what would you rent out if you are still living there. If this is the case and she will not drop the asking price. Then ask for her to buy out your half.

If this is not the case and you mean you are worried that you will both end up renting a bigger place from a landlord while renting out your old place. Then suggest that you get a place of your own and she stays at the old place untill it is sold. This tactic may force her hand.

Why do you need a bigger place. Is she expecting. If so point out that you don't want to her to be going through the hassle when she is giving birth or just has. Ignore last remark if not.

In other words it might be a bit callous but try calling her bluff, if as I assume you have already shown her stats of what prices are doing in the area, and tried the logical approach.

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Then ask for her to buy out your half.

If this is not the case and you mean you are worried that you will both end up renting a bigger place from a landlord while renting out your old place. Then suggest that you get a place of your own and she stays at the old place untill it is sold. This tactic may force her hand.

WTF is that sort of advice... what's your evening job? Divorce counsellor?

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I live in a 1 bed flat in good part of west London with my wife. She bought in Q4 2001.

Have been trying to sell because we need somewhere bigger. Had an offer end of last year - fell through. Then another in March  - fell through after two months, having taken it off the market - buyer did not have finance but EA's didn't bother to check on this beforehand.

Now we have changed EA and my wife has been convinced by them to increase the price by 10K.

Please can I have a little bit of feedback on this as she is very stubborn and will not listen to my pleas to move the price down rather than up.

I think that if we haven't got rid of it by the end of the year then we will have to rent it out.

I dont mean to be rude but your wife seems like abit of a plank, and i dont just mean a park bench plank i mean a QE2 Deck Plank... Unless there is something you have failed to mention.

It has bascially not sold and fell through more than once so your wife thinks its sensible to raise the price in a falling market?

If it was worth the price you were asking then someone would of bought it, putting another 10K on it is just stupid... but hey she might get lucky and find the greater fool.. but i think its much more likely your going to spend the next 12 months chasing the market down for the like of me.

Mrs whiskers.. with all due respect (to Mr whiskers) your an idiot.

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Guest horace

[quote=Samuel Whiskers.

Now we have changed EA and my wife has been convinced by them to increase the price by 10K.

Please can I have a little bit of feedback on this as she is very stubborn and will not listen to my pleas to move the price down rather than up.

Encouraging to see married couples discussing their financial affairs before making agreed decisions.

It is easy to see who wears the trousers here. :rolleyes:

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how come the wife is making all the decisions.?

are you a house husband ? seems like your wife wears the trousers, while you have a pinny on.

are you a man or a mouse ?

now get back in that front room and get her told that the flat is going to be reduced by 20K and she can shake her ass back into the kitchen and make you a big pie.

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how come the wife is making all the decisions.?

are you a house husband ? seems like your wife wears the trousers, while you have a pinny on.

are you a man or a mouse ?

now get back in that front room and get her told that the flat is going to be reduced by 20K and she can shake her ass back into the kitchen and make you a big pie.

You all missed the crucial bit, didn't you. It was Mrs Whiskers who bought the flat - it's hers.

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You all missed the crucial bit, didn't you.  It was Mrs Whiskers who bought the flat - it's hers.

Just like a man's financial assets are his no matter what happens. Opps! Nearly forgot that's not quite how it works in this "equal" world.

What's hers is hers and whats his is "ours". Can't blame the man for trying to even things out a bit... :D

Seriously, I think it's time to mention this "ours" concept because women are damn keen on it when it's the other way around. If it were the MAN about to lose money then I have no doubt that the woman would be rather concerned about "our" loss.

No, I'm not divorced. Just making a point... :D

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Guest horace
QUOTE(Bluelady

You all missed the crucial bit @ didn't you. It was [i)

Mrs [/i]Whiskers who bought the flat - it's hers.

Only if they had a pre nuptial agreement or am I wrong here?

horace. <_<

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<!--QuoteBegin-Bluelady

You all missed the crucial bit+ didn't you. It was [i--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Bluelady

You all missed the crucial bit @ didn't you. It was [i)</div><div class='quotemain'><!--QuoteEBegin-->Mrs [/i]Whiskers who bought the flat - it's hers.

Only if they had a pre nuptial agreement or am I wrong here?

horace. <_<

If it's in her name, you're wrong. The Married Women's Property Act was passed in the 19th century allowing women to have property which doesn't automatically become a marital asset.

My house didn't automatically become half my husband's when we married because it was in my name, our current house is jointly owned with both our names on the mortgage.

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You all missed the crucial bit, didn't you.  It was Mrs Whiskers who bought the flat - it's hers.

this whole area is covered with whats become known as 'stalkers law'

whereupon any casual housing increases are to be split between both parties. or ill take up all the hardwood flooring back y'cow. i paid for that. the sinks mine too. i got that from b & q ect.

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Just like a man's financial assets are his no matter what happens. Opps! Nearly forgot that's not quite how it works in this "equal" world.

What's hers is hers and whats his is "ours".  Can't blame the man for trying to even things out a bit...  :D

Seriously, I think it's time to mention this "ours" concept because women are damn keen on it when it's the other way around. If it were the MAN about to lose money then I have no doubt that the woman would be rather concerned about "our" loss.

No, I'm not divorced. Just making a point...  :D

You're not wrong here - my missus thinks exactly like this. I usually good humouredly remind her that if what was mine is now ours - then what's hers is ours (and that "ours" comes from the word owww! because it's painful).

Edited by greencat

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Higher offering price?

That might work, if you are prepared to discount, and your EA hints this

to buyers.

Some buyers would rather pay £180K for a property listed at £210K,

than £180K for the same property listed at £200K, on the theory that they

got a "better deal" in the first situation, because of the bigger discount.

Your wife and ger EA may be more clever than she sounds.

Yes DrBubb _some_ people will be like this but _most_ will look at the lower priced house first (all things being equal).

I have 2 identical houses ones marked up at 200K the other 210K, you would ask well whats the difference between the two... absolutly nothing at all, you would look at the 200K first.

On the same note when searching for a house _some_ people will will put a ceiling of 200K as thier absolute maximum thus ruling out ever being able to offer less and get a better discount because they will never know its there.

_Some_ people will look it up and realise that its on for 10K than it has been in the past (and not sold) and think to themselves 'your taking the piss', _some_ people will want to know why the price has increased 10K in a now confirmed buyers market.

I stand by my first assumption.... shes an idiot.

Caveat .. unless there is more information that has not been passed on.

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Guest growl

Only if they had a pre nuptial agreement or am I wrong here?

horace. <_<

If it's in her name, you're wrong. The Married Women's Property Act was passed in the 19th century allowing women to have property which doesn't automatically become a marital asset.

My house didn't automatically become half my husband's when we married because it was in my name, our current house is jointly owned with both our names on the mortgage.

You are correct I owned my house in my name when I married Mr Growl. There is no way I would have let him tell me what to do with the property. But I was always and am always willing to listen to his views. Since then we have owned property in joint names. But yes most of us did miss the point that Mrs Whiskers owned the flat.

But then it was late when I read the post.

All you can do then Whiskers is give her advice. Then when you own your next place together you will be able to have more of an actual say in things.

One thing though have you contributed to the mortgage of her place. If you haven't then she really has to learn for herself. :)

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Higher offering price?

That might work, if you are prepared to discount, and your EA hints this

to buyers.

Some buyers would rather pay £180K for a property listed at £210K,

than £180K for the same property listed at £200K, on the theory that they

got a "better deal" in the first situation, because of the bigger discount.

Your wife and ger EA may be more clever than she sounds.

Mr Whiskers I think you got for yourself a better wife than you seem to realise!

At least someone who looks like she knows one thing or two about non linear thinking!

Edited by Sphinx cat

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Guest

You could ask her to think about how much your salaries have gone up since 2001.

And how much house prices have gone up since 2001.

Then give her the old arguement: Could you re-afford this flat on your salaries at the current price (assume the same level of deposit as you had originally)? If not....

Who do you expect to sell to? We have a housing ladder. Maybe to someone younger than yourselves? Estimate their salary. Do you think they could afford? If not...

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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