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VacantPossession

Park Homes And Log Cabins

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There was a time when "park homes", mobile sites and log cabins were an agreeable alternative to Chav-town crapola and bricks and mortar excesses.

But now the park home ideal has all but vanished. Investigate the possibility of living in a rural setting and you are fighting (once more) a system which is utterly geared to those already in possession of large pads who are dumbing down....oops sizing down.

The once attractive concept of building you own hideaway has been completely hi-jacked by a long line of third parties whose sole raison d'etre is to part you with cash galore.

Example: You are looking to have a home built of wood, or logs, or you are unfortunate enough to buy one of those mock-elegant plastic windowed tinsel-type Tingdene homes and shove it on a "park". Look at the price of a new one, then look at the price of getting it sited. Answer: You cannot do it! The only people buying new homes of this type ALREADY have a plot. No wonder almost all mobile sites now ban anyone under the age of fifty (I think this qualifies for ageism which surely is illegal un EU law?)

You can buy a ready-sited home but someone, somewhere is making an enormous amount of cash (the "premium" charged by the site owner), since the price of a newly built home of this kind is anywhere between 20k and 85k, but in fact the sited home is going for between 90k and 300k....yes folks some of these mobile homes are going for 300k!! But you don't own the plot, you are merely paying a premium (often MORE than twice the cost of the home) for the privelige of living there, IN ADDITION to paying ground rent of between £100 and £200 per month.

The result is that it is MORE expensive to live in a mobile home of this kind than to buy and live in a substantial bricks and mortar house.

Oddly, the government departments which are meant to oversee the whole corrupt business fail to mention, address or discuss the insane rip offs perpertrated by site owners.

I welcome posts from those with experience of this "alternative" lifestyle.

VP

Edited by VacantPossession

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I'm interested Vacant!

Can't say I have experience of the "park home" scenario though. To be honest it would be the last type of home I would be interested.

I have looked into buying a plot with a timber framed (as opposed to log cabin) construction. From what I could see you would be no better off financially. The kits can originally appear cheap but when you add on all the other factors then the price seemed to work out no different than employing a builder to do a bricks and mortar job.

Kit home does sound a bit derogatory really, when in actual fact these homes probably have more insulating factors etc than your bog standard housing estate home and although considered a bit undesireable in England they are quite popular at the Northern end of the British Isles.

I would have liked to look further into the possibilities of a log cabin but PP usually is dependant on individual councils and many it seems, aren't too fond of anyone who goes against the grain (wood pun!). There goes me trying to get out of the box again!

As for cheaper alternatives in a rural environment I really don't think there is one. Saying that I have just (nearly, could fall through) bought myself an older non-traditional build property. It's giving my solicitor and surveyor fits but what the hell do the professionals know? They have been advising and holding the hands of the poor sods who have been paying for the overpriced garbage they have been buying for the last few years. It suits me, it's at a price I like and if bits fall off it I can keep nailing them back on. Investment? God knows: doubt it at least within the next 5 years anyway, but I got it at a price I liked, a place I liked, with the amount of land I liked.

My biggest gripes:

Downsizers who seem to think that this consitutes building a 5 bed en suite, wetroomed, conservatoried palace in a country area.

Environmentally friendly house builders who build the biggest place imaginable (how could we possibly live without a "family room") and have at least 50% of the walls as glass windows (triple glazed obviously) so they can stare at their immaculately coiffed landscaped garden (environmentally friendly of course). If they were true downsizers they would build something that suited their needs rather than their wants and have little windows to conserve energy. Look at the view indeed. Put your bluddy coats on you lazy sods, get outside and make good use of that garden!!!

Small rant over!

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I once visited a trailer park to buy a roof rack and was surprised at how nice it was.

Certainly a step up from some of the more scary council estates.

I'm was actually farily surprised they haven't caught on given the huge prices for even a grotty house in stabsville. But the reasons you give explain why people have given them a wide berth.

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Lots of bitter, twisted, snitches about these days though Dom.

Who have forgotten the saying You look after your own.

Well, apart from one reply (thanks Dipstick!), I'm surprised at the lack of interest. It seems this site is erring towards total convention when it comes to housing. If it ain't discussions about tedious two up and two downs in some ghastly suburb it doesn't appear to be worth discussing.

Oh well....

VP

Edited by VacantPossession

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There's only me and thee reading it as well VP.

Maybe it's because non-conventional build properties aren't seen as an "investment" in the traditional mainland England sense?

Homes aren't homes any more. They are "properties" and "investments". I've had numerous rows with my solicitor about this. I want a "home" at a reasonable price that allows me to carry on with my life whilst also allowing me to make a few amendments. Those amendments again will not be seen as conventional therefore you are seriously out of the mainstream.

In fairness what I would consider to be a typical "park" home, dependant on the price, I would see as a waste of money because they detriorate quite quickly and even if they don't site owners can inflict removal and renewal clauses that have occupiers in a bit of a vice.

Then again I do see kit homes, log cabins and eco properties as the way forward and wish we "English" would be a little more flexible and open in our attitudes towards them. After all, in reality what the hell does it matter if a house falls apart after 150 years. We are all long dead and if we are only living to pass on to our relatives then that is a bit sad and non-productive in the long run.

I think that we should be thinking a little more outside the box. If I can buy a home (without a mortgage) that is going to outlive me, fit it out with economy saving projects i.e. save money (and quite a bit of it on heating, lighting etc), make the land productive for me (that doesn't mean making money from it just increasing my quality of life in respect of diet) and make the land more productive for whoever owns it in the future, then surely it has "added benefit" even if it is not a typical "investment".

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There's only me and thee reading it as well VP.

Maybe it's because non-conventional build properties aren't seen as an "investment" in the traditional mainland England sense? 

Homes aren't homes any more.  They are "properties" and "investments".  I've had numerous rows with my solicitor about this.  I want a "home" at a reasonable price that allows me to carry on with my life whilst also allowing me to make a few amendments.  Those amendments again will not be seen as conventional therefore you are seriously out of the mainstream. 

In fairness what I would consider to be a typical "park" home, dependant on the price, I would see as a waste of money because they detriorate quite quickly and even if they don't site owners can inflict removal and renewal clauses that have occupiers in a bit of a vice.

Then again I do see kit homes, log cabins and eco properties as the way forward and wish we "English" would be a little more flexible and open in our attitudes towards them.  After all, in reality what the hell does it matter if a house falls apart after 150 years.  We are all long dead and if we are only living to pass on to our relatives then that is a bit sad and non-productive in the long run. 

I think that we should be thinking a little more outside the box.  If I can buy a home (without a mortgage) that is going to outlive me, fit it out with economy saving projects i.e. save money (and quite a bit of it on heating, lighting etc), make the land productive for me (that doesn't mean making money from it just increasing my quality of life in respect of diet) and make the land more productive for whoever owns it in the future, then surely it has "added benefit" even if it is not a typical "investment".

Agreed on all points. Thanks for being charitable and sticking with the thread!

VP

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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