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Help - Stuck In Japan !


johnny5thumbs

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Was visiting wife`s family in Kyoto when the volcano went up.

Due to fly back 10.15am tomorrow morn to Schipol then onward to Newcastle with wife & wee bairn., but Holland seems to be the last airport in Europe to relax the restrictions.

Any sensible advice for HPC`ers on reasonable alternative ways to get back reasonably quickly, bearing in mind we`ve got a 3 yr old travelling with us ?

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Was visiting wife`s family in Kyoto when the volcano went up.

Due to fly back 10.15am tomorrow morn to Schipol then onward to Newcastle with wife & wee bairn., but Holland seems to be the last airport in Europe to relax the restrictions.

Any sensible advice for HPC`ers on reasonable alternative ways to get back reasonably quickly, bearing in mind we`ve got a 3 yr old travelling with us ?

As you have somewhere to stay, that isn't going to cost a fortune, I'd sit it out for a few days.

Friend flew out of Lanzarote to Barcelona yesterday morning, and is hopefully now nearing Calais in a hire car. A nightmare journey considering she has two kids (aged 7 and 5) with her, but she does have two big advantages. There are four adults in her party to share driving, and she is fluent in Spanish and French if TSHTF.

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You can reach Japan from London without flying in just two weeks, by Trans-Siberian Railway. First, travel from London to Moscow, see the London to Russia page (48 hours). You then have a choice. Option 1, take the 'Rossiya' which runs every second day from Moscow to Vladivostok in 7 days. The 1993-built ferry 'Eastern Dream' operates once a week all year round from Vladivostok to Sakaiminato in Japan, taking 36 hours. Option 2 is to travel from Moscow to Beijing on one of two weekly Trans-Siberian trains, taking 6 days. From Beijing, take an overnight train to Shanghai, then there are two weekly ships to either Osaka or Kobe in Japan. Going via Vladivostok is easier to organise as you need fewer visas, but going via Beijing is the more varied and interesting option. See the Trans-Siberian page for more information on both these routes.

from

http://www.seat61.com/Japan.htm#London-Japan by Trans-Siberian railway

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Was visiting wife`s family in Kyoto when the volcano went up.

Due to fly back 10.15am tomorrow morn to Schipol then onward to Newcastle with wife & wee bairn., but Holland seems to be the last airport in Europe to relax the restrictions.

Any sensible advice for HPC`ers on reasonable alternative ways to get back reasonably quickly, bearing in mind we`ve got a 3 yr old travelling with us ?

How quick is quick? a day? two days a week?

The fastest way is to fly into Moscow and get the coach to Helsinki and the ferry back to Hull.

The other fast way is to find a car runner in Vladivostok, these boys are serious, they drive in teams of 2, in Japanaese cars at high speed with massive petrol tanks in the boot and will drive 24 hours a day at very high speed, the russian Amur highway is complete and sealed up now so they can maintain 90-110mph all the way to moscow. They don't even stop to pee, doing it in a bottle instead. You can tell them apart by their cars covered in cardboard sheeting. It is 5800 miles and can be done in 3.5 days. Then on to Helsinki by mini bus then ferry to Hull, Or just fly into Turkey there is a train that goes all the way to Istanbul to Paris or Berlin. It takes 24 hours

NOTE the amur highway isn't the worlds second most dangerous road in the world for no reason btw and I saw when the road was incomplete cars just flying past me the other way, so thus this is an exceptionally dangerous option.These cars have massive fuel tanks they crash they burn and the sides of the Amur highway are VERY steep and there are no medical facilities for 100s of miles.

HOWEVER are you British? If you are the Russian option is closed to you because Gordon annoyed Putin so that British people are only allowed to get Russian visas from London and there will be a 48 hour delay on a letter of invitation too because of this as well as 24 hours for approval from Moscow before you can even touch russian soil. There is ONE exception to this The Russian Consulate in Hong Kong, 3 British bikers managed to extract Russian visas out of them without having to go to London.

Most people FEDEX their passports to London, but FEDEX aircraft can't fly either. You can always go over to Busan and see if the ship Tiajin is in dock too.

I know somebody on board that ship he unofficially takes passengers, you sign a waiver though, takes 14 days to get to Felixstowe.

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Was visiting wife`s family in Kyoto when the volcano went up.

Due to fly back 10.15am tomorrow morn to Schipol then onward to Newcastle with wife & wee bairn., but Holland seems to be the last airport in Europe to relax the restrictions.

Any sensible advice for HPC`ers on reasonable alternative ways to get back reasonably quickly, bearing in mind we`ve got a 3 yr old travelling with us ?

heard a guy on the BBC earlier who'd flown from Japan to Madrid and then trained it to Calais

how quick / cheap that was I have no idea (neither in all likelihood tbh)

maybe by the time you got to Madrid UK airports may have reopened?

Are there direct flights to Scandinavia from where you are?

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heard a guy on the BBC earlier who'd flown from Japan to Madrid and then trained it to Calais

how quick / cheap that was I have no idea (neither in all likelihood tbh)

maybe by the time you got to Madrid UK airports may have reopened?

Are there direct flights to Scandinavia from where you are?

Last time hekla erupted Europe was covered in thick ash and crops failed, at this rate Madrid could also closed down within a week...

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you might want to stay in japan... The big brother neighbour hekla has just erupted according to twitter, or move to the southern hemisphere...

Its not apparently. Hekla's webcam is pointing at EYJAFJALLAJOKULL

Fecking twatter. It will be the ruin of us all.

Just heard there should be flights in North of england from tomorrow (leeds/bradford) if thats of any help.

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Guest Noodle

Was visiting wife`s family in Kyoto when the volcano went up.

Due to fly back 10.15am tomorrow morn to Schipol then onward to Newcastle with wife & wee bairn., but Holland seems to be the last airport in Europe to relax the restrictions.

Any sensible advice for HPC`ers on reasonable alternative ways to get back reasonably quickly, bearing in mind we`ve got a 3 yr old travelling with us ?

Divert to BKK, you can stay at my place if you want.

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heard a guy on the BBC earlier who'd flown from Japan to Madrid and then trained it to Calais

how quick / cheap that was I have no idea (neither in all likelihood tbh)

maybe by the time you got to Madrid UK airports may have reopened?

Are there direct flights to Scandinavia from where you are?

I heard SNCF were running more trains and cheaper tickets.

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Was visiting wife`s family in Kyoto when the volcano went up.

Due to fly back 10.15am tomorrow morn to Schipol then onward to Newcastle with wife & wee bairn., but Holland seems to be the last airport in Europe to relax the restrictions.

Any sensible advice for HPC`ers on reasonable alternative ways to get back reasonably quickly, bearing in mind we`ve got a 3 yr old travelling with us ?

The best option at the moment is to aim for Barcelona, or failing that Madrid, then somehow get back from there by land or sea.

The next best option is to get a flight to Reykjavic, which despite it's proximity to the volcano, is completely unaffected, then get a boat from Iceland to Scotland, and get down the East coast by bus or train to Newcastle.

Tomorrow, hopefully Northern Ireland and Scotland will re-open to flight traffic. If you can get a flight to Edinburgh, then it is a 15 - 45 minute bus ride to Waverley, depending on traffic and a 1.5h train journey to Newcastle. Glasgow and Prestwick will take a bit longer, but still within day-trip distance.

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Guest Noodle

The best option at the moment is to aim for Barcelona, or failing that Madrid, then somehow get back from there by land or sea.

The next best option is to get a flight to Reykjavic, which despite it's proximity to the volcano, is completely unaffected, then get a boat from Iceland to Scotland, and get down the East coast by bus or train to Newcastle.

Tomorrow, hopefully Northern Ireland and Scotland will re-open to flight traffic. If you can get a flight to Edinburgh, then it is a 15 - 45 minute bus ride to Waverley, depending on traffic and a 1.5h train journey to Newcastle. Glasgow and Prestwick will take a bit longer, but still within day-trip distance.

. . . and then Devon!

Blimey! He needs to change his username to Philius Fogg.

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Was visiting wife`s family in Kyoto when the volcano went up.

Due to fly back 10.15am tomorrow morn to Schipol then onward to Newcastle with wife & wee bairn., but Holland seems to be the last airport in Europe to relax the restrictions.

Any sensible advice for HPC`ers on reasonable alternative ways to get back reasonably quickly, bearing in mind we`ve got a 3 yr old travelling with us ?

I am not sure you appreciate the situation in post-apocylyptic Europe. Presently, we are living in a lava filled landscape desperately trying to forage for food in a situation if perpetual night, where the rain removes soot but briefly and burns our skin. Most of us are dead, we few survivors are the ones who can flee fast enough to escape the velocoraptors that now rule the land, whilst the kraken rules the seas. Barbaric, primitive societies are developing amongst the few survives, led by those saveage enough to cope in what is left.

However, everything should be grand in a few days, so I would bunk up and come back then. :)

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I am not sure you appreciate the situation in post-apocylyptic Europe. Presently, we are living in a lava filled landscape desperately trying to forage for food in a situation if perpetual night, where the rain removes soot but briefly and burns our skin. Most of us are dead, we few survivors are the ones who can flee fast enough to escape the velocoraptors that now rule the land, whilst the kraken rules the seas. Barbaric, primitive societies are developing amongst the few survives, led by those saveage enough to cope in what is left.

So you've been down Liverpool city centre on a Saturday night then ?

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Flights in Europe may resume tomorrow:

I would stay in Japan another 4/5 days coz I imagine there will be a backlog.

Indeed - boarders at our local school who should have flown back last Saturaday can't fly from HK until 6th May because the airlines are handling 1st and Business Class passengers first.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

Was visiting wife`s family in Kyoto when the volcano went up.

Due to fly back 10.15am tomorrow morn to Schipol then onward to Newcastle with wife & wee bairn., but Holland seems to be the last airport in Europe to relax the restrictions.

Any sensible advice for HPC`ers on reasonable alternative ways to get back reasonably quickly, bearing in mind we`ve got a 3 yr old travelling with us ?

Japanese adventure require great patience, glasshopper.

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I am not sure you appreciate the situation in post-apocylyptic Europe. Presently, we are living in a lava filled landscape desperately trying to forage for food in a situation if perpetual night, where the rain removes soot but briefly and burns our skin. Most of us are dead, we few survivors are the ones who can flee fast enough to escape the velocoraptors that now rule the land, whilst the kraken rules the seas. Barbaric, primitive societies are developing amongst the few survives, led by those savage enough to cope in what is left.

However, everything should be grand in a few days, so I would bunk up and come back then. :)

Yes, you're right. I hear that house prices are booming already.

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Which is the most dangerous then? And where's your link listing such roads, with the criteria to establish danger?

The most dangerous road in the world is in Bolivia near La Paz it was featured on top gear a few months ago, it is dangerous because it is high with 4000metre drops no barrier and insufficient space for passing traffic (it is 1.8 cars wide). It is essentially a cutting into a mountain side that is crumbling. The locals use carbed (bad idea) old cars and buses and take it far too quickly. It is rated on deaths, Doug the bloke I met in Mongolia had loads of photos of cars rolled down to the bottom of the valley.

Big balls Tiffany did the La Paz road in 2000 and she was scared,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yungas_Road

Was improved to bypass the most dangerous section in 2005.

The Amur highway officially did not exist before 2005, when Putin opened it early (all the bridges had been put in place, before that it was simply a mud track, known by world wide riders as the Zilov gap.

Mondo Enduro team attempted to get to the Lena Highway to ride to Yakutsk and failed horribly finding it to be a mud hell and skipped it by taking a barge and a train.

2001 LWR saw the horror of the mud hell and airlifted them over.

The Amur was dangerous because Russians would import cars from Japan to Moscow in large numbers due to the incredible distance and profit maximisation they would drive fast. The Amur highway has no speed enforcement no cops unlike the rest of Russia until you get to Ulan Ude. They would stick a massive fuel tank in the back seat, and drive fast on a road that could take it only when graded for too long on a road without armco barriers.

So they would drive fast and fall asleep or drive drunk and crash and burn because of all the fuel in the back. Added to that the remoteness, of it all, in that the dangerous bits are remote south of Tynda between Chita and Khabavosk, so you crash and you are hurt there is nobody to rescue you, you are even out of helicopter range and no fixed wing aircraft can come and save you.

The Russian government decided to seal it up and also at all the cafes bars and hotels along the route every 500km they would ban the sale of alcohol. These made it safer.

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Stay in Japan for a few more days.

We have workers in Finland trying to get back to the UK. A couple of them took just under 2 days to make it via train (Cologne-Paris-Eurostar (late cancellation) etc.), ferry and car. I would guess that means any ferries out of Helsinki are already booked full.

Another big group (~70) are coming back via coach(es) that the company have hired to get them back in one group.

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