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Say You Worked In The Public Sector


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Of either gritting your teeth and hoping you will not be one of the 35%+ who will loose their job over three years,

or trade in job security for a reduced working week.

Just like Iraq, the government have really painted themselves into a corner with their stimuli to underpin property prices er sorry the economy.

As I see it, the only real way to cut public spending without smothering the economy on it's death bed, is to encourage wholescale job sharing throughout the public sector were ever possible. 21 hours a week for most would be better then working none.

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Of either gritting your teeth and hoping you will not be one of the 35%+ who will loose their job over three years,

or trade in job security for a reduced working week.

Just like Iraq, the government have really painted themselves into a corner with their stimuli to underpin property prices er sorry the economy.

As I see it, the only real way to cut public spending without smothering the economy on it's death bed, is to encourage wholescale job sharing throughout the public sector were ever possible. 21 hours a week for most would be better then working none.

Work? , I think you mean employees!

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Of either gritting your teeth and hoping you will not be one of the 35%+ who will loose their job over three years,

can't take this seriously with such a ridiculous figure. 15% laid off at most (and I doubt that). cutting vacancies, pension contributions and pay, and natural wastage and retirement will do the rest.

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Opportunities for private sector job creation have been limited by a dominant public sector, the

absence of a conducive regulatory environment, high dependence on oil revenues and security issues.

The number of Iraqis employed in the public sector has doubled since 2005, with the public sector

currently providing 43% of all jobs in Iraq and almost 60% of all full time employment.

The recent sharp drop in oil prices and absence of other budget sources will make it harder for the

government to continue to grow its civil service as a strategy for job creation. High public sector

salaries are straining the public budget, consuming over a third of planned government expenditure in

2009.

Households without a civil servant wage‐earner are now more vulnerable to poverty. However, Iraq

cannot afford to expand its public sector any further.

6

Ministry of Finance Official Government of Iraq Federal Budget

http://www.iauiraq.org/reports/Iraq_Labour_Force_Analysis.pdf

Almost as stable as the UK.

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Of either gritting your teeth and hoping you will not be one of the 35%+ who will loose their job over three years,

or trade in job security for a reduced working week.

Depends on your fixed costs. For those who expand their lifestyle/debt to the limit of their income, I suspect the answer will be to grit their teeth and hope.

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Of either gritting your teeth and hoping you will not be one of the 35%+ who will loose their job over three years,

or trade in job security for a reduced working week.

Just like Iraq, the government have really painted themselves into a corner with their stimuli to underpin property prices er sorry the economy.

As I see it, the only real way to cut public spending without smothering the economy on it's death bed, is to encourage wholescale job sharing throughout the public sector were ever possible. 21 hours a week for most would be better then working none.

Get to the back of the class and join the others with the dunces cap on. Lose lose lose lose lose. Take a hundred lines. Sheez it drives me bonkers-you will be writing aluminum next.

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Lifestyle you can sort of fix; lidl instead of M&S, primark instead of vesace, pontins instead of barbados, it's the debt that's the killer.

Well you can fix it if you're currently shopping at M&S and holidaying in Barbados.

Even if you're debt free, if you are shopping at Asda and don't take holidays, it's not so easy.

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I can't speak for the diversity officers of this world but within Waste Management there has, and will continue to be a move towards privatising the operational side of things. Local authorities on the whole are incapable of doing this properly.

This means that 99% of the waste management jobs will be private sector by proxy with only a handful of Performance Officer type roles needed to monitor the contract on behalf on the client (the LA). This is only really necessary in the name of local democracy as the private sector partner will be paid with council tax payers' money.

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Guest happy?

and most of them will be long standing with such a good pay off they will basically take early retirement. Councils seem to be cutting 10% of staff - public sector may well do the same.

Wake-up and smell the coffee....

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/mar/08/civil-servants-strike-pcs

Central government is already reducing redundancy payments to public-sector employees, local government will follow suit. The alternative will be to make redundant those who are cheaper to get rid of - though this may well risk an age-related claim at an employment tribunal.

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Why can't LAs do this work properly? it is not some magic secret that only the private sector has access to.

Maybe the 'magic secret' is that if the private company does not do it properly or efficiently then they lose the contract - not really an option with your own employees who essentially have (or believe they have) a job for life that is not dependent on performance.

I agree entirely. I am looking forward to the private sector partner taking control. I hope this will enable me to do my job more effectively ( I might even go and get a job with them FFS). I wish that the LAs would start regular performance reviews with a view to dismissing lazy, inept staff. I for one don't enjoy working for an organisation with such a piss poor public image (and on most occasions this perception is unfortunatley correct).

Another thing to point out: hopefully the private sector partner can sort out the F-ing union who undermine operations by threatening strikes in order to protect the wages of bin men earning 35 grand plus. FFS. Roll on private sector partnership as far as I'm concerned.

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True, but many so called essentials are not essential - sky TV, mobile phones, X-boxes, latest dvds etc, ready made meals.

And if on average the public sector are paid on average more than the private sector then they will have to learn to budget better. Problem has been that working in the private sector there is always the risk of job loss (however slight) so there is I believe a tendency to be more conservative - spending wise) but in the public sector jobs were seen as 100% secure so debt was not an issue as it could be paid off in a few years. Just my opinion!

I thought average wages were lower in the public sector? I guess we need to see some figures to be sure either way.

It's interesting isn't it: back in the 1950s, a fridge would not have been regarded as a necessity, and a TV would have been a positive luxury. Sky TV, mobile phones, X-boxes, dvds and ready made meals hadn't even been invented.

And what would they have said about the idea of an 18-year-old spending a year backpacking in Asia, before taking on a £20,000 debt to study media studies?

Some of the people living in "poverty" these days have more than a person who considered themselves well-off did 50 years ago.

That isn't to say there isn't any true poverty, but IMHO the key problem is there is less opportunity.

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I though at this stage it was 'plans to reduce', will this be changed to standard statutory? I suspect not. Will they need to offer voluntary redundancy first? I guess so. This will attract those with lots of years with for example guarantees that cover their pension contributions up until retirement even if they have been made redundant; this has been done in the past - retire now 5 years early and we will ensure you get 5 more years of pension entitlement. Then after the voluntary people they can move to the cheap-to-get-rid-of.

I would like you to be right but IMHO Labour will not make severe cuts to the payments and neither will the Tories.

I thought redundancy terms had already been severely slashed, not mere plans, actually done

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Of either gritting your teeth and hoping you will not be one of the 35%+ who will loose their job over three years,

(...)

Get to the back of the class and join the others with the dunces cap on. Lose lose lose lose lose.

(...)

Perhaps he means not that the jobs will be lost, but rather that they will be loosed by their current incumbents to roam free in the market. Maybe some of the current or potential unemployed will be able to snare one of these loose jobs.

On a serious note, this is pretty much what going part time (in the OP's alternative scenario), amounts to.

Hmm. Was that third comma superfluous?

Edited by Timm
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I can't speak for the diversity officers of this world but within Waste Management there has, and will continue to be a move towards privatising the operational side of things. Local authorities on the whole are incapable of doing this properly.

This means that 99% of the waste management jobs will be private sector by proxy with only a handful of Performance Officer type roles needed to monitor the contract on behalf on the client (the LA). This is only really necessary in the name of local democracy as the private sector partner will be paid with council tax payers' money.

Across the anglo-saxon world the huge trend is for the government to outsource anything involving real work.. which usually they get to the point where they aren't actually capable of doing it anymore.

But to keep staffing of their division at peak levels, even increasing staffing. No one really knows what all the new people do, considering the actual function of the division has been outsourced.. but the people are busy doing something in the office buildings.

Edited by aa3
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Across the anglo-saxon world the huge trend is for the government to outsource anything involving real work.. which usually they get to the point where they aren't actually capable of doing it anymore.

But to keep staffing of their division at peak levels, even increasing staffing. No one really knows what all the new people do, considering the actual function of the division has been outsourced.. but the people are busy doing something in the office buildings.

In this instance staffing will be reduced greatly to 6. They will retain some of the promotional side of WM ie. design and printing of collection calendars as well as monitoring the operational side ie. counting recycling bins placed out for collection. No doubt they will still be fairly inefficient but there will only be 6 of them as opposed to 100. Surely an improvement of sorts. As i've said the 6 remaining staff are there to monitor the contract for the sake of local democracy more so than actually improving efficiency. I see nothing sacred in this token 6 - not a huge believer in this particular kind of democracy myself.

Another point to consider is that of every 1000 quid spent on council tax only about 150 will be spent on waste - picking your bins up so to speak. 300 will be spent on education, 300 on care and the rest on libraries, police precept, fire service, admin, ******** etc.

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Daily Wail, not going to read it.

Fair enough.

Personally, I'll read the Wail and the Gruinard, and Ambrose, and the Sun Says, and lump them all together, just different versions of what we are meant to think. How do you know what to question if you you don't know what the state sanctioned heuristic is?

:)

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Fair enough.

Personally, I'll read the Wail and the Gruinard, and Ambrose, and the Sun Says, and lump them all together, just different versions of what we are meant to think. How do you know what to question if you you don't know what the state sanctioned heuristic is?

:)

The Wail do tend to have the best journalists,not that they are right or left, they are right wing bent as can be in their reports. But still they tend to dig a little

not just interpret the twitter feed as the BBC tend to do or palm off reuters and cake it in New Britain meets Auntie at tea time.

(also the Daily Mail do this (((the bias not grovelling at Labours new door, hungry for a biscuit ))), Dom Joly wrote for them, copied it all off facebook he said) :)

Edited by Northwest Smith
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from the article

"The Public and Commercial Services Union (PCS) said the strike over plans to reduce redundancy payouts saw more than 200,000 public sector workers refusing to cross picket lines.

The strike is over plans to reduce payouts for civil servants made redundant in order to save £500m over three years. "

My reading of this is that they have not yet done the deed - hence the strikes.

fair enough.

I think I heard it was a done thing with councils, this implies that the civil service has not yet been done... or something like that!

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I can't speak for the diversity officers of this world but within Waste Management there has, and will continue to be a move towards privatising the operational side of things. Local authorities on the whole are incapable of doing this properly.

This means that 99% of the waste management jobs will be private sector by proxy with only a handful of Performance Officer type roles needed to monitor the contract on behalf on the client (the LA). This is only really necessary in the name of local democracy as the private sector partner will be paid with council tax payers' money.

why are they incapable...surely we are paying a premium for the very best in those management skills....OK, so they cant negotiate, draw up a contract, monitor costs, work a 5 day week, survive without a creche, or 6 weeks holidays plus sickies....apart from that, they are worth every penny and should be able to produce the work required.

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