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Smell the Fear

Planning Laws And Land Owners

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Does anyone know how land owners (i.e. those who own the greenbelt and other countryside and farmland upon which it is not possible to build houses) feel about the planning laws in this country?

Given a choice, would they prefer restrictive planning laws, which only allow them to sell small portions of land for development occasionally (albeit at a massive markup to its agricultural value) or would they prefer to sell large portions at low prices (which would probably be the case if there were little or no planning regulations).

If I owned a few thousand acres, it would seem preferable to generate say £1m a year from selling a few acres with planning permission (e.g. the current situation) rather than generating £1m a year by selling 100 acres (as I imagine would be the case if there were no planning laws).

Is this a happy coincidence for land owners?

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It is virtually imposible to get planning on green belt unless it is within the building zone of a town or village.

This building zone seems to bend depending on how the planning committe and parish council feel about it.

There is a village near me that is proposing to extend its zone. This will make the field in question jump from about £10,000 to £1 million!

The only way to get planning on green belt, at the moment, is by stealth.

ie build a dwelling and hope no one sees you or complains for ten years. You can then apply for a certificate of lawful development.

Other than that, know someone handy on the planning committe or get involved in farming and build with an agricultural tie.

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Dom

after reading your post I had a vision of building a house in the style of an American stealth bomber a kind of Huff house gone wrong, hopefully no one would notice it!

(I havn't been drinking...Yet)

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It is virtually imposible to get planning on green belt unless it is within the building zone of a town or village.

This building zone seems to bend depending on how the planning committe and parish council feel about it.

There is a village near me that is proposing to extend its zone. This will make the field in question jump from about £10,000 to £1 million!

The only way to get planning on green belt, at the moment, is by stealth.

ie build a dwelling and hope no one sees you or complains for ten years. You can then apply for a certificate of lawful development.

Other than that, know someone handy on the planning committe or get involved in farming and build with an agricultural tie.

Thanks Dom - who owns the land in the extension zone?

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Does anyone know how land owners (i.e. those who own the greenbelt and other countryside and farmland upon which it is not possible to build houses) feel about the planning laws in this country?

Given a choice, would they prefer restrictive planning laws, which only allow them to sell small portions of land for development occasionally (albeit at a massive markup to its agricultural value) or would they prefer to sell large portions at low prices (which would probably be the case if there were little or no planning regulations).

If I owned a few thousand acres, it would seem preferable to generate say £1m a year from selling a few acres with planning permission (e.g. the current situation) rather than generating £1m a year by selling 100 acres (as I imagine would be the case if there were no planning laws).

Is this a happy coincidence for land owners?

I guess it depends if they will ever get some of that elussive planning permission. I own a farm and have no prospects of ever getting planning permission even for a single house. My financial interests would be better served by relaxed planning laws.

My neighbour owns land next to a town. When the planning boundary gets redrawn in a couple of years, they could get >10m for land currently worth 20k. My guess is they are happy with the current planning rules (provided they get the line drawn in the right place).

In the South East, land accounts for 50-75% of the value of a new house. Thats a huge value transfer from the house buyer to the land owner lucky enough to get a line on the planning map drawn around a bit of their land. There is no dark conspiracy going on here. Its all down to the NIMBY attitude of home owners who persuade their politicians to screw those not fortunate enough to already own a home.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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