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Cutting Costs And Increasing Energy Performance


Guest crashdesk
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Guest crashdesk

Hi,

I know this isn't really a HPC type question but you've always been so much help in the past ;-)

I have trying to cut costs in all parts of the buying process and now thinking about, what if I actually move in. I was wondering if anyone has lived in or owns a solid walled house with no cavity wall? I have seen a beautiful, semi detached, house which ticks all the boxes apart from the lack of a cavity wall.

In the long run, I think cavity wall insulation would save me around £160 a year. Do you know of any methods of reducing heat loss in a house like this from experience. I know quite a few of you have owned a few properties over the years.

Many thanks,

C

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Hi,

I know this isn't really a HPC type question but you've always been so much help in the past ;-)

I have trying to cut costs in all parts of the buying process and now thinking about, what if I actually move in. I was wondering if anyone has lived in or owns a solid walled house with no cavity wall? I have seen a beautiful, semi detached, house which ticks all the boxes apart from the lack of a cavity wall.

In the long run, I think cavity wall insulation would save me around £160 a year. Do you know of any methods of reducing heat loss in a house like this from experience. I know quite a few of you have owned a few properties over the years.

Many thanks,

C

i assume when you say solid wall

you mean 9 inche brick wall

if you want a warm dry house

this is a cost cutting step too far

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Guest crashdesk

i assume when you say solid wall

you mean 9 inche brick wall

if you want a warm dry house

this is a cost cutting step too far

When I say cutting costs I don't mean not paying for cavity wall insulation etc. I want to pay for these things to cut costs long term. I really want to know if it worth my while buying a house without a cavity wall and to get some advice from someone who has experience living in a property like this.

I assume by your statement it's not a good idea to buy a house without a cavity wall and it would not be warm or dry due to rising damp etc?

Any advice welcome and a bit more detail please as it's a very serious question.

Thanks for your advice so far R + R

Edited by crashdesk
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When I say cutting costs I don't mean not paying for cavity wall insulation etc. I want to pay for these things to cut costs long term. I really want to know if it worth my while buying a house without a cavity wall and to get some advice from someone who has experience living in a property like this.

I assume by your statement it's not a good idea to buy a house without a cavity wall and it would not be warm or dry due to rising damp etc?

Any advice welcome and a bit more detail please as it's a very serious question.

Thanks for your advice so far R + R

a cavity wall is there to stop the damp from our wonderfull climate soaking through the wall

not rising damp as there should be damp proof course present no guarantee that is the case though

you can insulate the walls with a new stud wall on the inside containing insulation

you will pay for

the insulation

new stud walls skimming etc

all electrical fittings radiators etc on the walls being studded will have to be moved onto the new wall

this dont come cheap and major hassle if living in it

you will have improved the heat retention of the house slightly

but it wont be coming anywhere near todays standards

as my builder friends would say

you will still have a half ar$$ed job

just happened to be in an architects office this week

it was in a terrace and had received the above treatment

he was complaining that it still took a fortune to heat

rock on!

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Guest crashdesk

So even if the roof-space was insulated and PVC double glazing installed it would still cost a fortune to heat?

I think internal insulation is a no no as far as I'm concerned.

I'll be having a long good hard think about this.

If anyone else has any experience..?

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what i'd do. ask the vendor for a copy of their yearly gas bill, decide if you can justify the heating premium for the house which ticks all the boxes.

then maybe - through a capable surveyor/ engineer - establish payback periods/ cost benefit for thicker loft insulation, double glazing, properly draught proof doors, more efficient boiler and/ or heating system, maybe even renewables such as solar thermal or groundsource if you can stretch that far, as R+R says above, studding the internal walls would be a major hassle not worth considering in a semi.

solid walls doesn't mean it's deinitely damp, and their thermal mass can provide advantages to.

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So even if the roof-space was insulated and PVC double glazing installed it would still cost a fortune to heat?

I think internal insulation is a no no as far as I'm concerned.

I'll be having a long good hard think about this.

If anyone else has any experience..?

the architects office had the double glazing and the loft insulation

he was going to put another layer of loft insulation in

rock on!

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Guest crashdesk

what i'd do. ask the vendor for a copy of their yearly gas bill, decide if you can justify the heating premium for the house which ticks all the boxes.

Getting the facts, as opposed to surmising is definitely the best advice yet. I will be on the phone to the EA on Monday morning.

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Heating bills will be the best information you can get, also look at what the room thermostat (if any) is set to.

I have experience of a Victorian flat and a 1960s detached bungalow, I can tell you that insulation maybe the least of your worries.

Firstly I doubt you do not have cavities of any description, as others have point out lack of a cavity will lead to damp present on the inside. The purpose of an inner wall is to hide this (not prevent it). Older properties like Victoria ones use an internal dry wall made from lath and plaster which makes a cavity. You can detect this by tapping an outside wall on the inside, inner supporting walls will sound more solid.

Anyway the main problem that costs money to heat is drafts. The house I am renting is a particularly bad example, but I went from £700/year in the Victorian flat to the equivalent of about £5000/year in the bungalow. So don't be thinking that the least it will cost you is £160.

Drafts are usually caused by shoddy workmanship, in the original building and subsequent work, aswell as chimneys, airbricks etc.

Houses with cavity walls can at least be filled with cavity insulation, not so easy with lath and plaster, but you can add insulation if you really want directly to the wall surface with foam backed plaster board or such like, even EPS backed wallpaper will make a good improvement for little cost.

Most insulation will take several years to payback (depending on energy prices), but draft fixing will actually make the house more heatable and eliminate 'cold rooms' quickly. Get the building right first, although insulation is simpler it won't make huge differences to your bills, unless you do alot of it all at once (walls, roof and low-E noble gas filled double glazing).

Energy cost increases are currently really hitting me hard, Elect and gas have doubled in cost/unit over the last few years and as most is derived from fossil, likely to increase again in coming years.

Edited by Ride_on
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  • 11 years later...

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