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wtc

Few Questions..

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Right, me and the gf are currently under a 6 month contract which is all fine and dandy but at the end of the 6 months the letting agent are going to attempt to charge me in the region of 125 shiny pounds to "renew the contracts". Obviously I won't be paying, its the principle for one thing, so I have a few questions.

1. When the 6 months is up and if I don't sign a new contract, do I have vacate the property straight away? Or are they still obliged to give me two months notice before I have to leave? Is there anyway they can have written it into the contract that at the end of the 6 months, if no new contract is signed, then I have to leave immediately?

2. Whats the best way to handle this contract renewal situation? Should I contact them now and tell them I won't be paying(I'm 3 months into the contract) or wait till the last possible moment and then refuse to pay?

3. Is it a bit cheeky to refuse to pay the above and then ask for a rent reduction as well? :P

4. How likely is it that a letting agent would refuse to give me back my deposit, assuming the property is in as good a state as when we took it on? Whats the best strategy here, don't pay the last months rent and then wait till they pay back the deposit or shoot straight dice and pay the last months rent and trust they will do the decent thing? I notice the contract states if I don't pay my rent when I should, after 9 days they will start charging me interest, bearing this in mind is it really a good idea to not pay?

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When the 6 months is up and if I don't sign a new contract, do I have vacate the property straight away?

http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/index/family...fter_28_Februar

Right to stay: assured shorthold tenants 

Tenancies created on or after 28 February 1997

Your landlord cannot evict you during the first six months of the tenancy, or during the initial fixed-term, whichever is the longer, unless they have grounds for doing so, as for tenancies created before 28 February 1997.

At the end of this period your landlord can automatically get a court order to evict you, as for tenancies created before 28 February 1997.

http://england.shelter.org.uk/advice/advice-288.cfm

Fixed term tenants

If you have a fixed term tenancy your landlord has to have a reason (or 'ground') to evict you before the fixed term ends. The ground might be because:

you have rent arrears

you are constantly or regularly late with the rent

you have broken the terms of your tenancy for example by subletting when you are not allowed to

you have allowed the condition of the property to get worse

you have caused nuisance or annoyance

you landlord's mortgage lender is repossessing the property

Once there is a reason to evict you the landlord must provide a written notice. This must state the 'ground' your landlord is using. The notice has to be for a set length of time and must let you know that after that time ends your landlord can apply to the court for a possession order. The length of time on the notice depends on the reason your landlord is evicting you. It can be either 14 days or two months, depending on the reason your landlord is using.

How likely is it that a letting agent would refuse to give me back my deposit

Very.

Whats the best strategy here, don't pay the last months rent and then wait till they pay back the deposit or shoot straight dice and pay the last months rent and trust they will do the decent thing?

Put it this way: if you don't pay your last month's rent, your landlord can either take your deposit or chase you through the courts for the money. Which do you is the easier option? However, if you pay your last month's rent and wait for them to give you your money back, it is YOU who will have to chase THEM throught the courts. Do you really want to have to do that?

if I don't pay my rent when I should, after 9 days they will start charging me interest, bearing this in mind is it really a good idea to not pay?

They'll have to find you first. ;)

Edited by zzg113

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Hmmm, well As you know zzg, assuming you can remember that far back that is :P, I left my last property not only owing the last months rent but several weeks in addition to this. The LL at that property was a total shambles and its her own fault for not bothering to come and collect the rent and as she took weeks sometimes months to solve any issues with the property I had zero problems doing a bunk.

The problem now is I live with my gf and her being the good natured sort that she is, I can forsee her putting pressure on me to do the "right thing" and play by the book. Problem is experience has taught me playing by the book usually ends up costing me money :P But on the otherhand, the letting agent has been decent with me up until now so I don't want to screw them over when its possible if I did things right they would give me my deposit back and everything would end on good terms. But obviously I want my money back at the same time so not sure which way to go on this one. I definately am not going to be handing over £120 just for a new contract, what a con.

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Guest magnoliawalls

If you do pay the last months rent insist on being present when the final inspection is done. Most people don't think of doing that and you can argue about any silly deductions on the spot.

Last flat I moved out of the agency wanted to deduct the cost of getting window cleaners in as there was a smudge on the outside of a window. I pointed out that I could clean it then and there which I proceeded to do - saving myself a few ££.

The flat before that we were deducted £40 for forgetting 4 cups of our own amoung the crockery that came with the flat, and for not changing an unreachable light bulb. Had we been present at the inspection we could have carried the cups out and binned them :rolleyes:

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  • 302 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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