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Looking For A New Tv


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Whatever you do don't get a projector, they are very good value and stunning picture quality recently but unless the room

is big enough and you want to at least close the curtains and dim the lights every time it's not worth it.

In the back of your mind will be the bulb is always running down to zero hours every time you watch a movie or play

a game and you get used to the picture being meters across so it's no big deal after a while. Get a big TV and spend

as much as possible on installing a sound system correctly so it sounds punchy instead of booming and vague, acoustics

are much more important than picture quality I think.

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My 32 inch is fine for tv watching but for playing games I would go for a huge fecker now.

When I play COD on my 32 inch, get shot and then the killcam shows me getting killed from the POV of the killer I cannot even see myelf in the distance - they can obviously see me so I assume it is because they have a huge sodding LCD that shows more detail than mine.

I think some countries are now banning plasma screens on green issues.

I think LCDs are like PCs now - you will need to upgrade every 3 to 5 years so, IMPO, best to go for something you can afford rather than the most expensive thing now as, IMPO, within 3 years it will be old hat anyhow.

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My 32 inch is fine for tv watching but for playing games I would go for a huge fecker now.

When I play COD on my 32 inch, get shot and then the killcam shows me getting killed from the POV of the killer I cannot even see myelf in the distance - they can obviously see me so I assume it is because they have a huge sodding LCD that shows more detail than mine.

I think some countries are now banning plasma screens on green issues.

I think LCDs are like PCs now - you will need to upgrade every 3 to 5 years so, IMPO, best to go for something you can afford rather than the most expensive thing now as, IMPO, within 3 years it will be old hat anyhow.

My eyes are shite and I can still see them in the distance sniping me on killcam on a Panasonic 37 inch whether 720P or 1080P. How are you connected, HDMI, component or VGA? Also calibrating the TV correctly greatly helps (most people with HD's never do).

You're right about the upgrade cycle, OLED should be coming out this year, if you're in the market for a TV now I would wait for those.

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My eyes are shite and I can still see them in the distance sniping me on killcam on a Panasonic 37 inch whether 720P or 1080P. How are you connected, HDMI, component or VGA? Also calibrating the TV correctly greatly helps (most people with HD's never do).

You're right about the upgrade cycle, OLED should be coming out this year, if you're in the market for a TV now I would wait for those.

HDMI, calibrated, 32 inch Sony - COD World At War - Japs in the Jungle. Feckers.

I suspect that my next TV will be much larger and probably, by then, a touch-screen.

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LED is the coming technology, proper blacks and far greater contrast ratio. The Samsung LEDs look pretty good to me. I would wait until Sony or Panasonic release an LED set. That's the one I would buy. My qualifications to comment are 15 years in TV post productioon and 1000s of hours looking at screens of varying quality and price. There are only four companies that make LCD back panels BTW ,so your Samsung TV probably has the same panel as a Sony.

The technology coming after LED will be OLED (organic LED) these can be printed on anything from glass to fabric. So roll up screens will be the next big thing. Imgaine having a 32" inch screen on your laptop ?!

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HDMI, calibrated, 32 inch Sony - COD World At War - Japs in the Jungle. Feckers.

I suspect that my next TV will be much larger and probably, by then, a touch-screen.

Arrghh, COD WAW I also struggled to see people with all the natural terrain. To be honest, COD:MW2 isn't much better and it's mostly urban environments. One friend did say moving from 32 to 50 inches made a big difference for games like COD where often your enemy in the distance is a pixel wide!

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LED is the coming technology, proper blacks and far greater contrast ratio. The Samsung LEDs look pretty good to me. I would wait until Sony or Panasonic release an LED set. That's the one I would buy. My qualifications to comment are 15 years in TV post productioon and 1000s of hours looking at screens of varying quality and price. There are only four companies that make LCD back panels BTW ,so your Samsung TV probably has the same panel as a Sony.

The technology coming after LED will be OLED (organic LED) these can be printed on anything from glass to fabric. So roll up screens will be the next big thing. Imgaine having a 32" inch screen on your laptop ?!

Yep agree on the panels, my Panasonic has an IPS I think. The Samsung series 8 are edge-lit LED's. How much difference does backlit (is that the correct term ?)LED make and is it really worth getting one when OLED's are around the corner?

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I suggest a [HPC] clan so we can discuss house prices in the intermissions between games.

"Did you see that Predator missile I dropped on their base?"

"Yes, it killed five of them. Carnage. Do you think it'll affect house prices there?"

"Nah, this area's different, it's near a good school and it's near a train line to Kabul."

"Ohhh look, a new map to download... oh it's of Maidstone"

EDIT: I'm talking about COD MW2 in case anyone wanted to know

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Yep agree on the panels, my Panasonic has an IPS I think. The Samsung series 8 are edge-lit LED's. How much difference does backlit (is that the correct term ?)LED make and is it really worth getting one when OLED's are around the corner?

As I understand it and having talked to a Sony rep recently LED is not backlit in the same way that LCD is, your LCD telly is basically a translucent LCD panel in front of some cold flourescent tubes, just like the flourescent tubes you see everywhere, only smaller. the light shines through the panel and that gives you your pictures. Sony also make a professional monitor which uses white LEDs as the back light. The LED TVs out now are not 'backlit' the LEDs (light emitting diodes) provide both the light source and also the 'chroma' or colour information. That is why you get far better blacks on an LED set, black on a LED simply means that the LED is swtiched off i.e an absence of light.

Black on an LCD set is the liquid crystal goes opaque, but as the light source behind it is on all the time you can never get true solid blacks.

Affordable OLEDs are a way off Sony make a 12" set now and I think it retails at £2500. I reckon wait until a more prestigious maker comes out with an LED telly and get that. Then in five years when you will be able to buy a 70" roll up OLED screen you can put the LED in the bedroom.apols for the spoolung

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LED tv's are backlit, its really an LCD with LED backlight, the current UK series 6 7 8 Samsungs are LED edge lit, (led's around the edge only, reason they are so slim) and feature global dimming, its a rather crude way of getting high contrast, but it works not too bad, all led's in the set dimm according to black level in the picture, the drawback is on dark scenes, whites can look grey/dull as the dimming cuts in.

Some tv makers like Sony, LG, Samsung USA etc are making Local dimming LED LCD sets, the difference is there is an array of LED's directly behind the entire screen, and the tv software dimms diffrent parts of the screen according to the content, so it gives excellent contrast, some tv's like the more expensive Sony sets have RGB led's to give perfect whites/different shades. The problem with the older local dimming sets were blooming around white objects in dark scenes due to the led's not always on in the right places, or grouped into clusters that were too large. The current series 9 Samsung in the US have nailed it using local dimming, giving a picture not all that far from oled. OLED still has lifespan issues, so whether they can sort that out I dont know, they are a good few years away yet, led LCD is the way forward for now.

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avforums.com

is a good place to ask this sort of question.

Personally, I watch telly on a computer monitor and use a projector for films. 120 inches can't be argued with ;)

If you watch a lot of telly, might not suit your needs, but if you want the cinematic experience, can't beat a projector...

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I have been told that most of the screens are actually built by the same small number of producers ? So what manufacturer you get can a lot of the time mean sweet FA.

Not sure if anyone else has mentioned this, but I was always told by a friend that although the manufacturers all source from the same factories, the difference in quality was based on first come first served.

I.e. sony would take a batch of 5000 from a plant with a 1% failure rate (i.e. the best panels). The next comes along and pucks the next best (2%) failure rate, with the Asda/Tesco etc picking up the left overs at a cheap price. So, with the cheaper options you could get a perfect screen, but your risk is higher for failure.

This is even more apparent in the laptop market, with Apple, IBM, Sony laptops. dominating over the screen plants.

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Not sure if anyone else has mentioned this, but I was always told by a friend that although the manufacturers all source from the same factories, the difference in quality was based on first come first served.

I.e. sony would take a batch of 5000 from a plant with a 1% failure rate (i.e. the best panels). The next comes along and pucks the next best (2%) failure rate, with the Asda/Tesco etc picking up the left overs at a cheap price. So, with the cheaper options you could get a perfect screen, but your risk is higher for failure.

This is even more apparent in the laptop market, with Apple, IBM, Sony laptops. dominating over the screen plants.

Not sure. Seems to be a few nerdy TV geeks on this thread who could probably help !!

Got my TV back yesterday. All fixed. Good service from Hannspree. I got it for 289 all in 2 years ago. 32 inch. Comparible Samsungs etc.. at the time were more like 400. I can honestly say the pic I get is better than nearly any other similar sized TV I have seen. Most people who see it say the same.

Doesn't look quite as snazzy as the black piano Samsungs - then again who wants to look at the case - surely the pic is most important ?!

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Not sure. Seems to be a few nerdy TV geeks on this thread who could probably help !!

Got my TV back yesterday. All fixed. Good service from Hannspree. I got it for 289 all in 2 years ago. 32 inch. Comparible Samsungs etc.. at the time were more like 400. I can honestly say the pic I get is better than nearly any other similar sized TV I have seen. Most people who see it say the same.

Doesn't look quite as snazzy as the black piano Samsungs - then again who wants to look at the case - surely the pic is most important ?!

Oh I do agree, i would think that the factories have sufficient expertise now that the panels produced are very high yield (maybe 1 in 1000 has pixel problems). It would appear that in your case you were lucky with (slightly) worse than average odds compared to someone who bought a 'higher quality' tv.

The only other thing I guess worth considering is when the manufacturer decides it is a 'fault'. My LCD is considered acceptable with 2-3 stuck pixels (I disagree!) but my cheap monitor warranty states anything below 10 is not considered faulty!!

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