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Edmund Conway Supporting Nwo


dr ray
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Edmund Conway over at the Telegraph comes out in favour of the cashless society.

The comments are excellent and point out the evil behind this suggestion 'though it looks like comments from someone called "clare" have been censored.

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Edited by dr ray
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Edmund Conway over at the Telegraph comes out in favour of the cashless society.

The comments are excellent and point out the evil behind this suggestion 'though it looks like comments from someone called "clare" have been censored.

Link

There's a lizard-person lurking just below the surface of most journos clearly.

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There's a lizard-person lurking just below the surface of most journos clearly.

Apart from completely missing the point about the government being able to track the movements and spending patterns of all its citizens he comes out with the statement:

abolishing currency would make it easier to regulate the economy, since it would let the Bank reduce interest rates to below zero,

without explaining this would mean the government can syphon your savings away without even having to pretend that the "pound in your pocket is still worth a pound"

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Get rid of cash? Yes, that way the Bilderbergers and their stinking New World Order can keep tabs on their slaves more easily Edmund.

Cash is anonymous and we can't have privacy now can we? It's soooo deviant. Better to have everyone carrying something that leaves a paper trail after them.

And it won't just be the credit cards with a chip in them and soon these madmen will be able to control who can buy food.

It's all about control Edmund you silly boy.

Clare

on December 23, 2009

at 08:26 PM

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Good call.

When the government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.

Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)

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Edmund Conway laughing off the idea of a financial crisis 1 year before the biggest financial crisis in history

The more I read of this clown, the more I realise what a badly educated dick he is.

He has about seven degrees in economics, and yet basic economics are clearly out of his grasp.

"Money has two main purposes: to be a medium of exchange (helping us swap things of value) and a unit of account (a yardstick against which things can be priced). The textbooks also say it should be a store of value, although anyone who has experienced inflation will realise it hardly fulfils that role these days. "

and a few days earlier

"PS I know that some of you have, to put it lightly, disagreed with the policy of quantitative easing, a policy I’ve been supportive of right from the start. Contrary to some other commentators, I don’t believe that QE, as it has been carried out so far, has been covertly designed to try to generate the kind of debt-destructive inflation I’ve talked about above. Insofar as it has had an inflationary effect, it has only counteracted the immense deflation generated by the worldwide economic crisis. "

So money isn't much use because its value gets inflated away, and at the same time I advocate QE and other vile monetrist guff to allow for more stability.

I can't take him seriously.

Edited by MrB
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EC says

Until recently, there were three reasons not to cut the umbilical cord: first, because of the impression that a £10 note clasped in your hand is somehow safer than one handed over to a bank, or the Government; second, because cash is essential for small purchases; and third, because cash can be passed between people easily, as a gift or a favour.

I think having cash also helps to regulate your spending. Sometimes you've not got much cash on you so you're careful about how much you spend, and sometimes you might resist the temptation to buy something since £50 can feel like quite a lot when you've got to physically hand it over. If you're buying online instead for instance, it feels a lot easier just to click a button next to some numbers,

Maybe that's the problem: cash makes people too careful about spending, so we'd better get rid of it to lubricate the economy a bit more.

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Edmund Conway laughing off the idea of a financial crisis 1 year before the biggest financial crisis in history

The more I read of this clown, the more I realsie what a badly educated dick he is.

Nice find.

I especially enjoyed this:

They congregate online at a website called housepricecrash.co.uk, where they exchange views on why it is better to rent than to buy, and place bets on how long it will take before prices slide back to mid-1990s levels.

I wouldn't recommend the site to anyone looking for a balanced take on the market: many of its users seem to have a positive vendetta against homeowners.

Check out a few of the most popular forums on the site: The Arguments For Rising House Prices Debunked, The Perfect Storm Is Coming and Are We Living In One Huge Scam?

To which the answer is, of course, no.

:lol::lol:

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EC says

I think having cash also helps to regulate your spending. Sometimes you've not got much cash on you so you're careful about how much you spend, and sometimes you might resist the temptation to buy something since £50 can feel like quite a lot when you've got to physically hand it over. If you're buying online instead for instance, it feels a lot easier just to click a button next to some numbers,

Maybe that's the problem: cash makes people too careful about spending, so we'd better get rid of it to lubricate the economy a bit more.

A 2% skim off the top as profit every time you use your card would be a sweetener for the banks too seeing as they won't be able to take taxpayer money forever.

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Crikey, even a typical X-Factor viewing mong could have made a better case for promoting a cashless society than that Conway geezer.

Our every monetary transaction would be logged and recorded and in all probability made easily available to an endless list of agencies just like our telecommunications records already are without our knowledge or consent ( http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/2007/10/28/storm-over-new-snooping-law-91466-20019020/ ) but would, no doubt, receive a tiny fraction of the publicity afforded to, say, David Beckham's latest haircut.

All of which would be of little or no concern to the nothing to hide, nothing to fear drones who wallow in such utter bollux.

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Apart from completely missing the point about the government being able to track the movements and spending patterns of all its citizens he comes out with the statement:

without explaining this would mean the government can syphon your savings away without even having to pretend that the "pound in your pocket is still worth a pound"

He's clearly smoking crack. If the only way to use official money was via electronic payment systems of kind possible right now, people would just start using some kind of unofficial money for casual transactions instead (e.g. US dollars, Euros, old silver coins or whatever). We're so far from having the kind of technology that would, even in theory, provide a safe non-centralised form of electronic payment without the full aparatus currently required for credit cards etc that this idea really is a total non-starter. I'd also like to think that any government that seriously proposed it would have immediate riots on its hands, but the supine reaction to the ID card scheme has disabused me of that idea.

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He's paid by Mr and Mr Barclay.

Of course he's in favour of anything that promotes bankstering, property, retail and media.

Good point.

Presumably the mega-rich, politicians and celebs will able to keep their movements and transactions hidden "for security reasons" in the same way they don't have their health records online on the ultrasecure NHS electronic patient records for any toe-rag like me to mull over and post on the internet when I'm bored.

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Good point.

Presumably the mega-rich, politicians and celebs will able to keep their movements and transactions hidden "for security reasons" in the same way they don't have their health records online on the ultrasecure NHS electronic patient records for any toe-rag like me to mull over and post on the internet when I'm bored.

And their kids don't have to be on the national children's register thing (aka pederasts to-do list) either.

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Presumably the mega-rich, politicians and celebs will able to keep their movements and transactions hidden "for security reasons" in the same way they don't have their health records online on the ultrasecure NHS electronic patient records for any toe-rag like me to mull over and post on the internet when I'm bored.

According to the late film maker Aaron Russo the elite class of the NWO will have "KMA" (kiss my @rse) RFID chips. :ph34r:

The rest of us will have regular RFID chips. :(

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great

tradesmans tokens to make a come back

but will those caught bypassing the bankers system be executed

http://www.independent.org/store/book_detail.asp?bookID=75

In Good Money, George Selgin tells the fascinating story of the important yet almost unknown episode in the history of money—British manufacturers’ challenge to the Crown’s monopoly on coinage.

In the 1780s, when the Industrial Revolution was gathering momentum, the Royal Mint failed to produce enough small-denomination coinage for factory owners to pay their workers. As the currency shortage threatened to derail industrial progress, manufacturers began to mint custom-made coins, called “tradesman’s tokens.” Rapidly gaining wide acceptance, these tokens served as the nation’s most popular currency for wages and retail sales until 1821, when the Crown outlawed all moneys except its own.

Good Money not only examines the crucial role of private coinage in fueling Great Britain’s Industrial Revolution, but it also challenges beliefs upon which all modern government-currency monopolies rest. It thereby sheds light on contemporary private-sector alternatives to government-issued money, such as digital monies, cash cards, electronic funds transfer, and (outside of the United States) spontaneous “dollarization.”

Edited by lowrentyieldmakessense(honest!)
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Guest absolutezero

great

tradesmans tokens to make a come back

but will those caught bypassing the bankers system be executed

http://www.independent.org/store/book_detail.asp?bookID=75

In Good Money, George Selgin tells the fascinating story of the important yet almost unknown episode in the history of money—British manufacturers’ challenge to the Crown’s monopoly on coinage.

In the 1780s, when the Industrial Revolution was gathering momentum, the Royal Mint failed to produce enough small-denomination coinage for factory owners to pay their workers. As the currency shortage threatened to derail industrial progress, manufacturers began to mint custom-made coins, called “tradesman’s tokens.” Rapidly gaining wide acceptance, these tokens served as the nation’s most popular currency for wages and retail sales until 1821, when the Crown outlawed all moneys except its own.

Good Money not only examines the crucial role of private coinage in fueling Great Britain’s Industrial Revolution, but it also challenges beliefs upon which all modern government-currency monopolies rest. It thereby sheds light on contemporary private-sector alternatives to government-issued money, such as digital monies, cash cards, electronic funds transfer, and (outside of the United States) spontaneous “dollarization.”

Exactly.

Withdraw the use of cash and people will just invent their own.

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great

tradesmans tokens to make a come back

but will those caught bypassing the bankers system be executed

http://www.independent.org/store/book_detail.asp?bookID=75

In Good Money, George Selgin tells the fascinating story of the important yet almost unknown episode in the history of money—British manufacturers’ challenge to the Crown’s monopoly on coinage.

In the 1780s, when the Industrial Revolution was gathering momentum, the Royal Mint failed to produce enough small-denomination coinage for factory owners to pay their workers. As the currency shortage threatened to derail industrial progress, manufacturers began to mint custom-made coins, called “tradesman’s tokens.” Rapidly gaining wide acceptance, these tokens served as the nation’s most popular currency for wages and retail sales until 1821, when the Crown outlawed all moneys except its own.

Good Money not only examines the crucial role of private coinage in fueling Great Britain’s Industrial Revolution, but it also challenges beliefs upon which all modern government-currency monopolies rest. It thereby sheds light on contemporary private-sector alternatives to government-issued money, such as digital monies, cash cards, electronic funds transfer, and (outside of the United States) spontaneous “dollarization.”

There was another reason for the factories to issue their own coinage.

I visited an iron works in S Wales and they had a shop on site for the workers. They paid the workers in tokens which could only be used in the shop and they made almost as much profit from the shop as they did from making iron.

It is almost certain people would use alternative currency of sorts but if the authorities take the line which has already been put forward that only drug dealers and terrorists have any use for cash then it will be evidence you are living off ill-gotten gains if you are found with any alternative currency, including gold and silver. They don't even have to make it illegal to have - they can just say you acquired it by illegal means or were going to use it to fund terrorism or other crimes. Not a big step to take nowadays.

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There's a lizard-person lurking just below the surface of most journos clearly.

This gets a little boring. The OP never mentioned 'lizard people'. For anyone who has not cottoned on, the whole absurd 'lizard thing' that is tacked on to the very real subject of the banking/state theft of your freedoms, is a psychological manipulation. The idea is to make you completely dismiss the subject because of the forced association with something so 'dumb and stupid'. It is also supposed to put you off discussing the subject for fear of looking stupid.

I'm not suggesting that the poster is a shill, more likely a dumb repeater. Members of the public often unwittingly further the propaganda thinking that they are being 'clever'. He'll probably post a picture of planet X or some sad case wearing a tinfoil hat for his next trick.

"There is no such thing as an independent press. I am paid weekly for keeping my honest opinions out of the paper I am connected with. Others of you are paid similar salaries for similar things.

The business of the journalist is to destroy the truth, to lie outright, to pervert, to vilify, to fawn at the feet of mammon, and to sell the country for his daily bread.

We are the tools and vassals of the rich men behind the scenes.

We are the jumping jacks, they pull the strings and we dance. Our talents, our possibilities and our lives are all the property of other men. We are intellectual prostitutes."

- Journalist John Swinton, ~1880

Edited by Prime Realist 8
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This gets a little boring. The OP never mentioned 'lizard people'. For anyone who has not cottoned on, the whole absurd 'lizard thing' that is tacked on to the very real subject of the banking/state theft of your freedoms, is a psychological manipulation. The idea is to make you completely dismiss the subject because of the forced association with something so 'dumb and stupid'. It is also supposed to put you off discussing the subject for fear of looking stupid.

Another prime example of a phrase that is used to dissuade independent inquiry is "conspiracy theory".

Almost all meaningful theories of significant historic events are, by definition, conspiracy theories. Humans generally plot and plan together to further their common aims. In other words, they conspire.

The question to ask is usually: Which conspiracy theory best fits the evidence?

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According to the late film maker Aaron Russo the elite class of the NWO will have "KMA" (kiss my @rse) RFID chips. :ph34r:

The rest of us will have regular RFID chips. :(

won't do much good in either case.

the science behind it is dangerous.

RF will interfere with the ability of your red bloodcells to pick up/transport/release the correct amount of oxygen to various capillaries.

that's even before you get into any of the stuff like genetic mutation.

Edited by oracle
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About time people started saying this. Cash is more of an anachronism than the cheque, which is itself being fazed out.

Cash has no real value - fiat currency is based on trust. Stock up on gold by all means, but do not pretend that the bits of paper with the Queen's head on are anything other than a representation of the numbers on ledgers in the bank. They are printed and destroyed to keep up with consumer demand, and that demand is shrinking and shrinking. I have had electronic money in the form of a debit card for years, and now I also have an Oyster card and the new e-cash thing on my bank card that allows payments of up to £10 at certain retailers.

The only concern is for those who want privacy for their payments. I strongly believe that no one should have the right to record or monitor how you spend your money. However, a system of prepay cards would be sufficient, loaded with £50 or £100 for example. This would not be unlike the modern gift voucher card system that we have now. The cards themselves could even be exchanged from person-to-person for informal payments.

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