Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Middle Class Recession: Benefits Claims For White Collar Professions Soar


Recommended Posts

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1237662/Professionals-hit-middle-class-recession.html

Britain is in the grip of a 'middle-class recession', with huge numbers of university-educated workers on the unemployment scrapheap, official figures show.

Jobseeker's Allowance claims for some professions have risen by more than 900 per cent, with architects, surveyors, accountants and lawyers among the hardest hit.

Office for National Statistics data reveals that almost every sector has been affected by rising unemployment, with large numbers of casualties in the South and East.

In a disclosure that will fuel anger about the bloated public sector, the only job where claims for unemployment benefit have fallen since the recession is 'senior officials in national government'.

With many construction projects halting, architects have fared the worst, with 1,595 signing on, compared to 155 at the start of the recession.

Quantity surveyors are next, with 1,310 claiming compared to 135 last March. Vets, tax experts, surveyors and accountants are among other professions that have experienced the biggest rises.

The Conservatives say the Government is failing to do enough to help unemployed white-collar workers and offering little in the way of specialised help.

There are no jobs for these people, do the Conservatives want the govt to create some meaningless jobs for them to do?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 77
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1237662/Professionals-hit-middle-class-recession.html

There are no jobs for these people, do the Conservatives want the govt to create some meaningless jobs for them to do?

why doesnt the UK allocate one of the accountants to each MP to help with their expenses and tax avoidance affairs, they could also allocate one of the architects aswell to assist with home improvements. Payment to them could be made through an increase to the claimable allowance by the MP

Just highlights how shortsighted the electorate is adding to unemployment numbers and hurting the economy by trying to reign in the expenses

Edited by Tamara De Lempicka
Link to post
Share on other sites

Vets fortunes depend very largely on farmers, who are not discretionary customers. Significant falls might indicate changes in food production.

Was I right in thinking that there'd been an exodus of vets into pets practice in recent years, rather than farm work? I'd read that it was much more lucrative, easier work for pets and that the agricultural sector had struggled to attract enough people?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Was I right in thinking that there'd been an exodus of vets into pets practice in recent years, rather than farm work? I'd read that it was much more lucrative, easier work for pets and that the agricultural sector had struggled to attract enough people?

It used to be a reasonable cost to take Benji to the vet.

since Private Pet Healthcare Insurance, just like US people healthcare Insurance, poor buying and buy insurance companies and sponsored Services have forced prices up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Vets have become so absurdly expensive that the majority of the population cannot responsibly afford to have a pet. You would have to work an entire month at the average income after tax to afford one visit to the vet. Why isn't there a relationship like for 1 hours of the vet's time you would have to work 5 hours?

Its sort of an analogy to the cost of doing business crushing business in the country. You see less and less younger adults having pets as time goes by.

Edited by aa3
Link to post
Share on other sites

...

Its sort of an analogy to the cost of doing business crushing business in the country. You see less and less younger adults having pets as time goes by.

I guess maybe also the fact that rental contracts stop you keeping pets might have an effect, seeing as more younger people will be renting nowadays as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Vets have become so absurdly expensive that the majority of the population cannot responsibly afford to have a pet. You would have to work an entire month at the average income after tax to afford one visit to the vet. Why isn't there a relationship like for 1 hours of the vet's time you would have to work 5 hours?

Its sort of an analogy to the cost of doing business crushing business in the country. You see less and less younger adults having pets as time goes by.

Erm, minor operation on dog's claw, £140. In the same ballpark as an optician or dentist if some minor work gets done.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interestingly most of those jobs are either directly or some way related to property, be it the obvious surveyors and architects to the quarry men extracting raw materials to build with, to the financial types who funded it all.

Interestingly IT not on the list which seems to tie up with my experience.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interestingly most of those jobs are either directly or some way related to property, be it the obvious surveyors and architects to the quarry men extracting raw materials to build with, to the financial types who funded it all.

Interestingly IT not on the list which seems to tie up with my experience.

Indeed, building things create wealth.

If prices were reasonable again, the market would take off.

Problem solved....except of course, for the moneylenders.

Link to post
Share on other sites

....

BTW, going to University does not make you middle class.

That's what the old farts that read the Mail want to believe. They have scrimped and saved to send their kids there and now are "middle class" (having bought their council house).

If only there weren't 21 million asylum seekers (all with AIDS) in northern France the Eurostar wouldn't have got stuck in the tunnel and Timmy and Jessica could have done their xmas shopping. See? You don't get that kind of news in the working class papers do you?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought I'd share my experiences of the last 18 months or so in architecture.

In Summer '08 our practice had approx 16 staff, order books were full and from the start of the year our balance sheet was projecting a bonus for everyone of a least a months wages. Work started to get cancelled, scaled back or put 'on hold'. We had a big increase in bad debts and by the start of '09 we were struggling to break even with very little work on the horizon. A round of redundancies was started and 3 people were made redundant, we'd also had a high level of natural wastage over this period so by summer '09 we were down to 7 staff.

To cut costs we relocated our offices, and also made serious attempts in diversifying our client base.

However by June it was becoming clear that the figures still weren't stacking up, voluntary redundancies were called for, none were forthcoming so all staff jointly agreed to a 12% pay cut, sacrifice 5 holidays and our early finish on fridays. Redundancies were on the table again in October, so again they were avoided by a collective sacrifice (take note BA trolley pushers :P ) with half of the staff on a 3 day week and the other half on 4 days.

This lasted for just a month and currently everyone is on a 4 day week.

Hopefully this illustrates fairly succinctly the typical state of the industry at present, it would be fairly safe to extrapolate my experiences throughout most of the construction trade I'd have thought. It's been a shit year, but were still going, when you read about public sector expecting pay rises it certainly feels like a smack in the chops. Still maybe when taxes go up they'll have the money to pay for it :blink:

Unless we're all claiming by then of course.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought I'd share my experiences of the last 18 months or so in architecture.

In Summer '08 our practice had approx 16 staff, order books were full and from the start of the year our balance sheet was projecting a bonus for everyone of a least a months wages. Work started to get cancelled, scaled back or put 'on hold'. We had a big increase in bad debts and by the start of '09 we were struggling to break even with very little work on the horizon. A round of redundancies was started and 3 people were made redundant, we'd also had a high level of natural wastage over this period so by summer '09 we were down to 7 staff.

To cut costs we relocated our offices, and also made serious attempts in diversifying our client base.

However by June it was becoming clear that the figures still weren't stacking up, voluntary redundancies were called for, none were forthcoming so all staff jointly agreed to a 12% pay cut, sacrifice 5 holidays and our early finish on fridays. Redundancies were on the table again in October, so again they were avoided by a collective sacrifice (take note BA trolley pushers :P ) with half of the staff on a 3 day week and the other half on 4 days.

This lasted for just a month and currently everyone is on a 4 day week.

Hopefully this illustrates fairly succinctly the typical state of the industry at present, it would be fairly safe to extrapolate my experiences throughout most of the construction trade I'd have thought. It's been a shit year, but were still going, when you read about public sector expecting pay rises it certainly feels like a smack in the chops. Still maybe when taxes go up they'll have the money to pay for it :blink:

Unless we're all claiming by then of course.....

Thanks for that - it was enlightening. It sounds like you have sensible staff at your place and hopefully you'll survive for when things improve.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess maybe also the fact that rental contracts stop you keeping pets might have an effect, seeing as more younger people will be renting nowadays as well.

Yep even if they could afford a pet's health insurance, they couldn't keep them anyway, because of rental rules. Its basically a no-brainer when you own rental units to say no pets.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Vets fortunes depend very largely on farmers, who are not discretionary customers. Significant falls might indicate changes in food production.

Vets no longer depend on farmers. Vets got into bed with insurance companies and if you do not have insurance nowadays a vet is very very expensive visit if your dog, cat, wabbit, gerbil, etc, gets ill.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought I'd share my experiences of the last 18 months or so in architecture.

My cousin is totally fecked though, in that no architect firms are hiring, and I believe there is a LONG experience requirement, he couldn't find a did his masters and is about to graduate, again possibly to no job.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 434 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.