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How Old Are You?

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Just wondering how many of you (potential FTB's) on HPC are in your mid to late twenties or older, and why didn't you get on the property ladder in the late 90's when prices were very much affordable?

I have many friends who could have bought themselves a place 6 or 7 years ago but chose to stay at home and piss it up every week because they didn't want all the hassle of getting a mortgage/moving out. Now they are 30+ and still living with their parents.

They do curse the current state of affairs but deep down they know that they only have them selves to blame for taking the easiest option.

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I'm 30, bought my first place in Feb 2000, part exchanged in Dec 2001, made almost f*** all on my new house, sold in March 2005.

Didn't have enough deposit to buy until Feb 2000, and in hindsight should've kept my first house, but the GF at the time wanted something bigger to buy together.

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Just wondering how many of you (potential FTB's) on HPC are in your mid to late twenties or older, and why didn't you get on the property ladder in the late 90's when prices were very much affordable?

I have many friends who could have bought themselves a place 6 or 7 years ago but chose to stay at home and piss it up every week because they didn't want all the hassle of getting a mortgage/moving out. Now they are 30+ and still living with their parents.

They do curse the current state of affairs but deep down they know that they only have them selves to blame for taking the easiest option.

I'm old enough to remember Tron the movie.

And I believe that they didn't buy because they thought it was expensive.

:lol::lol:

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and you now belive yourself to be a financial wizard.

Not at all, and I thought it was a pretty simple question.

If you had better things to do when you were younger thats fair enough. Many thousands of youngsters preferred not to tie themselves down.

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I'm old enough to remember Tron the movie.

And I believe that they didn't buy because they thought it was expensive.

:lol:  :lol:

You're such a smarmy twit!

Edited by OzzMosiz

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I’m old enough to remember the first run of Star Trek. I can be described as a baby boomer, but as I married late in life I’m a FTB and those bloody baby boomers are in my way too

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I'm old enough to remember Tron the movie.

And I believe that they didn't buy because they thought it was expensive.

:lol:  :lol:

You could be right, but that means that they will probably never buy anything now.

And Tron was a great movie.

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I am 25.

Rent = £150 per month.

Deposit = £40K (maybe £70K if i want to put the lot down)

Earnings circa £65K per annum at the moment.

didnt buy before = too young and still in education.

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In answer to your question I have had a ball over the last 10 years, many of my friends did buy homes with all the associated costs:

Council tax

Electricity

Gas

etc etc

but they were unable to go out as much sports cars holidays etc

I pay £120 a month which suits my parents, I respect their decisions and they understand my position. this has enabled me to save a good deposit as well. the decision now facing a lot of people in this age bracket is to stay in the UK or not.

The people with little or no debt, no kids and no morgage are truly free.

Whats your age & motive for this thread ;)

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Just wondering how many of you (potential FTB's) on HPC are in your mid to late twenties or older, and why didn't you get on the property ladder in the late 90's when prices were very much affordable?

I'm 26 and I started work in the summer of 2000. Looking back, TTRTR is right: I did think things were expensive then which put me off. My regret is actually that I didn't buy a house when at Uni and rent out a couple of rooms to mates. That would have been very profitable (with hindsight!). The problem is that when you're a student, most normal people don't think about house prices and invesments, they're more worried about having fun! And quite right too.

By the time I started thinking about house prices and saving for a deposit, it was 2002 and prices were just getting stupid so I really think I would have regretted buying then.

I really hate it that everyone has to by a financial expert in order not to get ripped off. I'm not interested in making money at others' expence (be that through BTL or just cashing in on a house crash). All I want is a sensible sized house at a sensible price.

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In answer to your question I have had a ball over the last 10 years, many of my friends did buy homes with all the associated costs:

Council tax

Electricity

Gas

etc etc

My close group of friends, all in their early 30's are split into 2 groups, those that did buy and those that didn't.

Those that did buy are tied down by a large mortgage and nagging wives :) while us house free group have continued to live the high life.

But seriously, it's easy to look back and say why didn't I do this and that, but for most of my 20's I was in a seriously low paid job, despite the fact property was cheap by today's standards I don't think any of my group of friends could have raised the capital back then.

I for example was earning less than £10k a year so I had no chance of buying back then, most of my other friends were at Uni.

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Well just to piiss on your parade.

I bought my first property when I was 27 in 1979. A very nice 2 bed maisonnette in a nice part of West London.

I got married when I was 32 and had first child at 37.

My first property cost £22,600 and I got an 18k mortgage on it when I was earning about 9k in a very average job.

Between leaving school and the age of about 35 I had a great time - life was one long party - and that included after I bought my flat. I was lucky.

If you bought before the latest madness - you were lucky, not shrewd. If you are one of those saddos who keep going on about its always been hard etc and you have to make sacrifices ... if you're one of those saddos that has let your youth pass you by paying off a massive mortgage instead of having fun - well tough luck, you never get your youth back.

You might be wealthy when you're older - like the bloke next door to me. Married young, retired at 62 after a career in banking, big house, lots of money, good pension - and BORED RIGID.

I'd rather have had my life than his.

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I'm 33.

I didn't buy in the 90's because what was on offer for £40-140K IMO was $hite.

Nothing has changed, those houses are still $hit, just over valued $hite.

I wanted a place with land but I didn't want to get into debt for it, I've done it.

Oh yeah, this was when living in the countryside wasn't fashionable, before 'Down to Earth' and other such TV gob $hite. I paid cash.

I had years of being told I live like trailer trash by terrace dwelling FTB's. Now that my neighbours are the super rich, (neighbours are 1/4 mile away)all those people who laughed wish death on me, in a few years todays BTL gloaters will be the same towards the debt free people on this forum.

For me nothing has changed.

If you can't control whats going on around you, you can at least control how you feel about it.

You can't tell people they missed the boat, it is simply not true.

Will you be saying the same thing to the unborn generation of FTB in 25 years?

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Guest uberstuka

I left home at 16 and I've never been back (as in lodging with my parents). I lived the Rock and Roll dream from `86 to `01, and yes I had a LOT of fun :) All of my friends are either actors or musicians and they, too, followed various dreams and stuck two fingers firmly up at the establishment! None of them are destitute, all now have families and mortgages and none regret taking time out to explore life before tying themselves down to property.

My nomadic lifestyle wasn't conducive to house buying and the thought of purchasing didn't even cross my mind until around a year ago. I've rented since 1986, and still do. The money I have paid out in that time is not `dead money', it helped me live the way I wanted to and achieve much of what I hoped for.

You will never hear me whine about paying rent.

Speaking of which: my rent is £280 per month and we've more than enough saved that buying a house and putting down some roots is an option, but after educating myself fully as to the pros and cons of doing so in 2005 I (with my partner) decided to sit this one out for at least another 2/3 years; whereupon we'll have another £50/60K+ saved up and we `should' be able to buy that 3/4 bedroomed Victorian/Edwardian property we both have our eyes on for at least £50K less.

But who said: Men make plans: God Laughs.

I hope this all comes to fruition, though I could easily drop dead tomorrow.

Edited by uberstuka

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I'm 29

Straight out of uni in 98 to a job in London (Starting on £11K) Rent was £375 a month so it was impossible for me to save a deposit and house prices were to much for me back then. No rich parents to fall back on either and ask for a £50K loan/gift.

Now earning £30K ish so am able to save the deposit but in the last 5 years HPI has overtaken me. If I was 5 to 10 years older I'd be a smug ******* now sitting on a pot of cash which I did nothing to earn.

Lifes a bitch ain't it

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Well I had no option but to get a place of my own when I was 22. That was 8 years ago.

I'm glad I did it, but I'd like to move and the high prices also make it difficult for me to get somewhere bigger/better/greener without taking on more debt.

If I was 22 now I wouldn't dream of getting a 6 figure mortgage.

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Well I had no option but to get a place of my own when I was 22. That was 8 years ago.

I'm glad I did it, but I'd like to move and the high prices also make it difficult for me to get somewhere bigger/better/greener without taking on more debt.

If I was 22 now I wouldn't dream of getting a 6 figure mortgage.

Exactly why house price crash would be good for you, decrease the margin for your next step up!

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Thats true, and we all know that everything is overpriced (except mine ;) ).

I wouldn't want to see it happen because of high interest rates though, seeing people you know lose their homes is not a good thing and anyone who dreams of profiting from repossessions is a wrong'un.

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35, emigrated from UK in 1993. Move countries every few years for work, so no point to buy PPR.

Property in UK or Vancouver makes no sense as investment at present, when it does, may buy.

Family members in UK have stayed sensible (parents bought first house only when they retired, for cash. One sister has no mortgage, other sister is very quickly paying hers down, as mortgage rates dropped, they both kept repayments same)

Anecdotal comment from elder sister - many in their area have MEW'ed for cars & holidays.

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Just wondering how many of you (potential FTB's) on HPC are in your mid to late twenties or older, and why didn't you get on the property ladder in the late 90's when prices were very much affordable?

I have many friends who could have bought themselves a place 6 or 7 years ago but chose to stay at home and piss it up every week because they didn't want all the hassle of getting a mortgage/moving out. Now they are 30+ and still living with their parents.

They do curse the current state of affairs but deep down they know that they only have them selves to blame for taking the easiest option.

Not sure if you're trying to wind people up, but I'll give you the benefit of the doubt. The problem with the "only got themselves to blame" bit is that it relies on hindsight.

People on here are often accused of being jealous that they didn't (think to) buy at the right time, when in fact those accusers never thought to either. They just did, because their circumstances dictated that they were at that stage in their lives.

I bought in 1999, and it was purely because I was ready to do so. I couldn't care less that my property is twice as expensive now apart from the fact that I would like to get a place with a garden and I want the prices to come down in order to narrow the price differential (since those places have also doubled but started off higher in the first place hence increasing the differential).

Many people who did buy at the right time think they are some sort of genius now, and dole out advice to younger naive friends and colleagues. Those who clearly were lucky (with the timing (I did say "were". They are in for a shock.)) are those who have MEWed and blown it on toys, because they clearly have no concept of how it all works.

I know that I could MEW and get my hands on substantial sums, but I also know that I then owe that money back, because it ain't free. You can't withdraw equity and spend it AND still have the equity. I think that point is missed by many people.

Undoutedly there are people who bummed around a bit and now wish they hadn't, the kind of people you talked about. But I'm sure there are far more people who were too young to buy at the optimum time (e.g. still at school) or had various other legitimate reasons for not buying.

This is where having cyclical markets in something so vital as housing can really punish people unfortunate with timing. If we could have steady year on year growth of, say <inflation>% a year, every year in housing then everyone would be far better off.

But no, our esteemed leaders, through short-termism (i.e. winning elections), deliberately encourage these cycles so that it benefits their terms, and hinders the terms of the opposition when they get in at the other part of the cycle.

Goodness, I have rabbitted on.

BTW, to answer your question, I'm 4 weeks old as you can clearly see in my avatar.

Edited by aclwalker

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I'm 28

Graduated 2000

suffered after Dotcom crash, no work = unable to buy

I would have bought, but realised that house price where getting out of hand,

So stayed where I am a saved ever since, have nice deposit between my Partner and I,

not in well paid job, But i'm starting a another new business which if goes ok will put me in postion to buy in 3-4 years time with either no or nice mortgage (depends on how far prices come down)

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Here is a picture of me and me mates when we first visited the UK.

lorback.jpg

Of course a lot has changed since then. Back then I could have bought a nice two bedroom complete with stable for a single denarius. My missus wanted to go back to Rome. That was THE place to be at the time

If only I could go back in time :D

Of course Charlie the Tramp can vouch for me. He was there at the time :P

Edited by GCS15

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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