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The Friday after Thanksgiving in the US is known as black Friday - the first day in the year when retailers traditionally go from being in the red to in the black as consumers flock to the shops to start their Christmas shopping.

For this reason I do not think we will have a black Friday this Friday - but keep an eye on those US sales figures over the weekend.

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PPT won't allow it to happen, they'll be moving today to ensure no crash.

If it gets really bad overnight I wouldn't be surprised if Bernanke announced before market open that every US citizen is to receive a free house and $1 million in cash.

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The Friday after Thanksgiving in the US is known as black Friday - the first day in the year when retailers traditionally go from being in the red to in the black as consumers flock to the shops to start their Christmas shopping.

For this reason I do not think we will have a black Friday this Friday - but keep an eye on those US sales figures over the weekend.

Different explanation in wiki!!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Friday_(shopping)

Origin of the name "Black Friday"

Black Friday as a term has been used in multiple contexts, going back to the nineteenth century, where it was associated with a financial crisis in 1869. The earliest uses of "Black Friday" to mean the day after Thanksgiving come from or reference Philadelphia and refer to the heavy traffic on that day. The earliest known reference to "Black Friday" (in this sense), found by Bonnie Taylor-Blake of the American Dialect Society, refers to Black Friday 1965 and makes the Philadelphia origin explicit:

JANUARY 1966 -- "Black Friday" is the name which the Philadelphia Police Department has given to the Friday following Thanksgiving Day. It is not a term of endearment to them. "Black Friday" officially opens the Christmas shopping season in center city, and it usually brings massive traffic jams and over-crowded sidewalks as the downtown stores are mobbed from opening to closing.[11]

The term Black Friday began to get wider exposure around 1975, as shown by two newspaper articles from November 29, 1975, both datelined Philadelphia. The first reference is in an article entitled "Army vs. Navy: A Dimming Splendor," in The New York Times:

Philadelphia police and bus drivers call it "Black Friday" - that day each year between Thanksgiving Day and the Army–Navy Game. It is the busiest shopping and traffic day of the year in the Bicentennial City as the Christmas list is checked off and the Eastern college football season nears conclusion.

The derivation is also clear in an Associated Press article entitled "Folks on Buying Spree Despite Down Economy," which ran in the Titusville Herald on the same day:

Store aisles were jammed. Escalators were nonstop people. It was the first day of the Christmas shopping season and despite the economy, folks here went on a buying spree. ... "That's why the bus drivers and cab drivers call today 'Black Friday,'" a sales manager at Gimbels said as she watched a traffic cop trying to control a crowd of jaywalkers. "They think in terms of headaches it gives them."

Usage of the term has become more popular in the Midwest since 2000.

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Different explanation in wiki!!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Friday_(shopping)

Origin of the name "Black Friday"

Black Friday as a term has been used in multiple contexts, going back to the nineteenth century, where it was associated with a financial crisis in 1869. The earliest uses of "Black Friday" to mean the day after Thanksgiving come from or reference Philadelphia and refer to the heavy traffic on that day. The earliest known reference to "Black Friday" (in this sense), found by Bonnie Taylor-Blake of the American Dialect Society, refers to Black Friday 1965 and makes the Philadelphia origin explicit:

JANUARY 1966 -- "Black Friday" is the name which the Philadelphia Police Department has given to the Friday following Thanksgiving Day. It is not a term of endearment to them. "Black Friday" officially opens the Christmas shopping season in center city, and it usually brings massive traffic jams and over-crowded sidewalks as the downtown stores are mobbed from opening to closing.[11]

The term Black Friday began to get wider exposure around 1975, as shown by two newspaper articles from November 29, 1975, both datelined Philadelphia. The first reference is in an article entitled "Army vs. Navy: A Dimming Splendor," in The New York Times:

Philadelphia police and bus drivers call it "Black Friday" - that day each year between Thanksgiving Day and the Army–Navy Game. It is the busiest shopping and traffic day of the year in the Bicentennial City as the Christmas list is checked off and the Eastern college football season nears conclusion.

The derivation is also clear in an Associated Press article entitled "Folks on Buying Spree Despite Down Economy," which ran in the Titusville Herald on the same day:

Store aisles were jammed. Escalators were nonstop people. It was the first day of the Christmas shopping season and despite the economy, folks here went on a buying spree. ... "That's why the bus drivers and cab drivers call today 'Black Friday,'" a sales manager at Gimbels said as she watched a traffic cop trying to control a crowd of jaywalkers. "They think in terms of headaches it gives them."

Usage of the term has become more popular in the Midwest since 2000.

Yes, all very well but... that does not negate the fact that US retailers refer to the Friday after Thanksgiving as Black Friday for the reasons I mentioned.

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FWIW, the index futures are open with the SP500 down about 2%.

Shares won't be in the black, that's for sure.

If tomorrow does turn black in the United States then it'll make for an interesting day watching their media. Black Friday is traditionally the day when they glory in the purchasing of the usual junk for Xmas.

US breakfast TV will be full of 'Black Friday' (go buy more junk proles) spin in the morning, only for the realisation that they have inadvertently prophecised something horrific to dawn on them once markets open. I'll find it funny anyway. :lol:

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I have to say I'm uber-bearish on the stockmarket for the next 3 months. It was horrendously overbought (you have to go back to Oct 87 for the last time that it gotwas that extended). My short position is nicely inprofit and I expect to be adding to it in the short term.

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It could be an interesting day for sterling too.

FT Blog

“We do expect the Dubai government to step up efforts to raise capital via real estate sales, and sales of their UK assets in particular,” James Lewis, a member of the Gulf capital markets team at property consultant Knight Frank told Reuters.

May be wrong, but Friday looks stormy to me...

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We seem to have a definitional problem .....

- Light grey = 300 Dow points

- Dark grey = 600 Dow points

- Black = 900 Dow points

I would be surprised if we get to a dark grey Friday to-morrow let alone a black Friday .......

Edited by LuckyOne
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Up early. Cup of tea. Eagerly anticipating the end of the rediculous optimism seen this summer.

I know it's been said alot on here, but the tide does seem to have changed. There are still lots of properties going SSTC in the areas that i'm monitoring, but actual completed transactions are currently down 85% (from 400 p/m to 50-60 p/m).

The next leg down starts here...

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I just looked at Dow futures on Bloomberg and it looks like it's down 225 points. I'm not sure if I'm looking at the right thing, though, since I couldn't find the website I used to look at for this info.

Edited by blankster
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