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Guest Disposable Heroes

It Makes Me Sad To Think Another Generation, Priced Out.

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I really thought everything was falling into place and economic reality would realign the cost of a home for people. It hurts me to think many people being conservative and trying to do the right thing are getting burnt. Many reckless people living on the edge not having to pay a thing for a mortgage while others struggle.

That's life I guess, you've just got to make the best of your relative situation.

Indeed. You have to adapt to take advantage.

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Guest Dizzy Rash Call

I really thought everything was falling into place and economic reality would realign the cost of a home for people. It hurts me to think many people being conservative and trying to do the right thing are getting burnt. Many reckless people living on the edge not having to pay a thing for a mortgage while others struggle.

That's life I guess, you've just got to make the best of your relative situation.

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this correction will draw out over 10 years. the blow is being softened for the boomers (core vote govt have to pander to) and being paid for by the younger generations. UK is, short term, fecked

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Guest Dizzy Rash Call

Indeed. You have to adapt to take advantage.

While trying to maintain decency and moral ethics, I'm not going to let myself be corrupted by it.

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Indeed. You have to adapt to take advantage.

If I was in the priced-out generation, I would be adapting by taking my labour to another country.

Many of our brightest and best will do this, leaving us with proportionally more of the dimmest and worst.

Nice one, Gordon.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

If I was in the priced-out generation, I would be adapting by taking my labour to another country.

Many of our brightest and best will do this, leaving us with proportionally more of the dimmest and worst.

Nice one, Gordon.

Terribly sorry, lovely lady from an Australian recruitment agency has offered to fly us both out for a week to see if we like the place, expenses paid.

Following on from this, we'll get well paying jobs, a car and accommodation, and the opportunity to move around South Australia every few months to see if we like it.

Oh, and the currency is worth more against the pound than it was.

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Guest Dizzy Rash Call

So you are going to sit there and moan for the rest of your life?

No I bought a house around four years ago, I'm still interested in the economy and to be honest I like the crack in off topic. It does make me sad to hear young people and others for whatever reason, priced out though (through no fault of their own). Strange thing is I should be happy things are picking up (housing market, I don't want to see a depression), but I'm not, I'd have rather have seen it fall to the floor and give some people a chance.

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Guest Dizzy Rash Call

If I was in the priced-out generation, I would be adapting by taking my labour to another country.

Many of our brightest and best will do this, leaving us with proportionally more of the dimmest and worst.

Nice one, Gordon.

I can understand this point of view, but it's difficult to do with family commitments and friends. It just goes to show how far some people have been pushed.

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If I was in the priced-out generation, I would be adapting by taking my labour to another country.

Many of our brightest and best will do this, leaving us with proportionally more of the dimmest and worst.

Nice one, Gordon.

Can't say I am the best and brightest, but am seriously considering my options with an eye to a move in the next few years. Starting to think even teaching English abroad is preferable to living in the UK

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No I bought a house around four years ago, I'm still interested in the economy and to be honest I like the crack in off topic. It does make me sad to hear young people and others for whatever reason, priced out though (through no fault of their own). Strange thing is I should be happy things are picking up (housing market, I don't want to see a depression), but I'm not, I'd have rather have seen it fall to the floor and give some people a chance.

I used to get very concerned, but came to realise there is little that can be done.

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Can't say I am the best and brightest, but am seriously considering my options with an eye to a move in the next few years. Starting to think even teaching English abroad is preferable to living in the UK

Same here, I'm lucky in that I have a few options but unlucky in that not many of them include Britain, my preferred one would Britain but I finding it hard to commit to staying at the moment. If some form of certainty isn't forthcoming in the next 2 years I'll be off to Holland, Germany, Switzerland or Canada, maybe Australia. Even through all the trials of my life and the last few years I always knew ways to get through them but I have no idea what I'm doing right now and that is unusual for me. Just glad I have more options now than ever thanks simply to past experience and investing in my skills while waiting for sanity. It may be time to start planning an escape from the asylum. :unsure:

Edited by godless

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Guest Dizzy Rash Call

I used to get very concerned, but came to realise there is little that can be done.

Yes that's the sad thing I find reading some of the threads. Especially when you hear sensible good people saving hard for a deposit, waiting to buy a house they can sensibly afford, doing the right thing. I kind of want to tell people "look just stop dwelling on it and get on with your lives" (was said to me on many occasion), much easier said than done though.

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this correction will draw out over 10 years. the blow is being softened for the boomers (core vote govt have to pander to) and being paid for by the younger generations. UK is, short term, fecked

Perhaps, in the longer term, the UK is fecked.

In the shorter/medium term, it seems to me that cash rich boomers are the only ones buying property at the moment. And they are buying as investments rather than leave their money in the bank.

So, BTL continues. Not on the same scale and not using borrowed money (to the same extent). But enough to keep the market up and youngsters priced out.

I can't see much changing in the near future unless the boomers' cash runs out. No sign yet.

The madness continues - along vaguely generational lines. Homes under the Hammer (current series) is still full of people buying at auction, doing up and renting. There seems to be an infinite demand for rented property.

What would be good is if 100,000 young people gave notice to quit their rented properties, on the same day, and moved home with mum and dad.

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this correction will draw out over 10 years. the blow is being softened for the boomers (core vote govt have to pander to) and being paid for by the younger generations. UK is, short term, fecked

Will you give over with the boomer stuff? Most of us have seen our private pensions trashed by the city and taxed by Brown, many of us lost company pensions to the likes of Maxwell , our savings return less than the observable rate of inflation. Anything more than a basic state pension, and you're still paying income tax.We don't escape council tax. There's a few flat rate benefits offered to all, because the government runs scared of means testing, but it doesn't amount to much. When we die, our assets are taxed highly above the threshold, which for most, is falling in relative terms as house prices rise. Is this one reason that the government is so desperate to keep HPI pumped?

The government has a desperate need to raise revenue. The only people they can effectively tax are those, who at the end of their working lives, have assets and savings that can be stolen, er, I mean taxed. Any young person is completely tapped out trying to pay for a house, or saving the deposit to pay for a house. So we get these cackamannie schemes floated, like £20K flat tax to pay for our care when we retire (conveniently lifting the money out of the lump sum from private pensions), regardless of whether we need care or not.

The government propaganda is that the greys have stolen all the wealth, to misdirect the blame away from the real villians, the Browns, Applegarths and their ilk. We are being primed for a massive tax hike on ordinary pensioners, to pay for the financial services industry malignancy, and to support the 5% who own 95% of the land in this fair country.

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What would be good is if 100,000 young people gave notice to quit their rented properties, on the same day, and moved home with mum and dad.

Perhaps the same mum and dad who are also amateur landlords?

This is actually happening in my family: My little bro and his significant other are moving in with my parents to save money on exhorbitant rents..... my parents own a starter (2 bed semi) house which they rent out in the same town that my little bro cant afford to live in.

Stuff goes around and comes around....

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Can't say I am the best and brightest, but am seriously considering my options with an eye to a move in the next few years. Starting to think even teaching English abroad is preferable to living in the UK

Same here. Main difficulty for us will be proximity to childminding services family, so realistically that would mean France, and I think that les frogs are not quite as fcuked as here, but heading that way.

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Will you give over with the boomer stuff? Most of us have seen our private pensions trashed by the city and taxed by Brown, many of us lost company pensions to the likes of Maxwell , our savings return less than the observable rate of inflation.

I hate to break this to you, but those private pension were never EVER going to be able to return enough for you to have a comfy life for the 30 years you plan to spend in retirement. It was basically a pyramid scheme which relied on you conning you children into joining the same scheme, and then spending their money and either leaving the pot empty for when they retire or forcing them to con their children into paying in as well.

The catch is... because you've forced up hosue prices/rent so high, plus the £5 TRILLION state pension liability you handed to them, your children can't afford to save for a private pension, and will struggle to keep a roof over their heads and clothes on their backs, and mostly wont have children who they could con into paying their pensions for them.

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If I was in the priced-out generation, I would be adapting by taking my labour to another country.

Many of our brightest and best will do this, leaving us with proportionally more of the dimmest and worst.

Nice one, Gordon.

Quite , life is what you make of it... owning a house isn't a right and if it doesn't work currently for some then they have no option but to find their own route.

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I hate to break this to you, but those private pension were never EVER going to be able to return enough for you to have a comfy life for the 30 years you plan to spend in retirement. It was basically a pyramid scheme which relied on you conning you children into joining the same scheme, and then spending their money and either leaving the pot empty for when they retire or forcing them to con their children into paying in as well.

The catch is... because you've forced up hosue prices/rent so high, plus the £5 TRILLION state pension liability you handed to them, your children can't afford to save for a private pension, and will struggle to keep a roof over their heads and clothes on their backs, and mostly wont have children who they could con into paying their pensions for them.

The above is reminiscent of the kind of rhetoric the Nazis used...

I's just utter, paranoic nonsense - people 'conning' their children into taking out pensions?

And it's those who work in the civil service who enjoy final-salary pension schemes at the taxpayers' expense. Why are 'boomers' to blame for that?

Get a grip and think about what you're saying before you type.

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Quite , life is what you make of it... owning a house isn't a right and if it doesn't work currently for some then they have no option but to find their own route.

Owning your own home should be a right otherwise its servitude or impoverishment, currently we have both in mild doses but things aren't getting any better. Thats not to say a home is a house simply that everyone should have the right to there own property either built by their own hands or paid to others to build it for them free from tax and land pricing.

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Quite , life is what you make of it... owning a house isn't a right and if it doesn't work currently for some then they have no option but to find their own route.

Correct, its a privilege. A privileged few own the housing stock and they reserve the right to indebt everyone else from here to eternity so that they can gain access to it.

stop this sort of nonsense then you stop most of the crap that we put people through just to get a home.

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And it's those who work in the civil service who enjoy final-salary pension schemes at the taxpayers' expense. Why are 'boomers' to blame for that?

Because boomers benefited from their pension stoppages going straight back into general taxation (or being used as a discount on their costs of employment, depending on the accounting mechanics involved). If the money had been saved and put away, there would still be a problem but not on anything like the same scale and reform would be much easier. Its pretty simple, the costs of their pensions were deferred because you didn't want to pay for them at the time. So now you are on the hook for what you didn't pay + interest. You make out they are stealing from you, you actually stole their time and labour (opportunity costs, blah blah) if you have no intentions of paying them what you owe. You are doing exactly what you were criticising others for btw.

Edited by Cogs

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Get a grip and think about what you're saying before you type.

How about taking your own advice?

Some of us could see pensions as a pyramid scheme 25 years ago, and declined to put our own money in to it. I wasn't blogging in the 1980s, but here's from before the "credit crunch": http://bahumbug.wordpress.com/2007/04/03/pensions-blame/

It’s fundamentally a numbers game dictated by demographics. As the number of pensioners grows, so does the cost of providing for them, even if pensions per person actually shrink. A savings pot accumulated over one’s working life works fine when it’s only a few who have it, but when you try to extend that to everyone, you’re up against a more fundamental problem of supply and demand. No matter how much money the pensioners have saved, you need working people to supply their needs. And only so much of the economy can be devoted to pensioners without collapse in the rest of it.

So the basic scam was the promise heavily marketed to us in the 1980s. It was doomed from the start. I declined to invest in it, because I thought it blindingly obvious that the system then in operation could not last through to my retirement. No, I didn’t predict how 1980s-style pensions would collapse; just that it would inevitably happen. My generation will not enjoy the generous pensions of our elders, because there are simply too many of us. My own expectation is that I’ll go on working for as long as my health allows it.

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