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Trees Dying Everywhere.

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I've noticed in the last few weeks that lots of trees seem to be dying - leaves shrivelling up like brown paper. Yes...I know it's autumn and leaves would be turning yellow / brown anyway, but this looks different. Most badly affected are horse chestnuts, all the local ones seem to have been affected by leaves shrivelling up and going brown like dried tobacco. I know that chestnuts are one of the first trees to turn in autum too, but it's more than this.

Then I noticed a fine row of poplars, about 20 years old, went from healthy and green to totally dead brown within a week or so. The Leylandii hedge in our garden is getting brown patches (it's a nice, neat hedge, I don't want to lose it and my neighbours all like it too). I've noticed that some sycamores are showing the shrivelled brown paper leaf look too.

Is there a widespread multi-species tree epidemic going on, masked by the fact that it's the beginning of autumn? It's been quite dry but not drought conditions, so I don't think it can be lack of water.

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I've noticed in the last few weeks that lots of trees seem to be dying - leaves shrivelling up like brown paper. Yes...I know it's autumn and leaves would be turning yellow / brown anyway, but this looks different. Most badly affected are horse chestnuts, all the local ones seem to have been affected by leaves shrivelling up and going brown like dried tobacco. I know that chestnuts are one of the first trees to turn in autum too, but it's more than this.

Then I noticed a fine row of poplars, about 20 years old, went from healthy and green to totally dead brown within a week or so. The Leylandii hedge in our garden is getting brown patches (it's a nice, neat hedge, I don't want to lose it and my neighbours all like it too). I've noticed that some sycamores are showing the shrivelled brown paper leaf look too.

Is there a widespread multi-species tree epidemic going on, masked by the fact that it's the beginning of autumn? It's been quite dry but not drought conditions, so I don't think it can be lack of water.

Many Horse Chestnuts seem to suffering for quite a few years (3 or so), whatever is causing it seems to progressive year on year effects on the trees until this year some of them little/no decent green leaves at all during the summer period.

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Many Horse Chestnuts seem to suffering for quite a few years (3 or so), whatever is causing it seems to progressive year on year effects on the trees until this year some of them little/no decent green leaves at all during the summer period.

It's been a particularly dry summer and water tables are way down. Good news for me living in a 300 year old pile of blotting paper,bad news for trees.

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I've noticed in the last few weeks that lots of trees seem to be dying - leaves shrivelling up like brown paper. Yes...I know it's autumn and leaves would be turning yellow / brown anyway, but this looks different. Most badly affected are horse chestnuts, all the local ones seem to have been affected by leaves shrivelling up and going brown like dried tobacco. I know that chestnuts are one of the first trees to turn in autum too, but it's more than this.

Then I noticed a fine row of poplars, about 20 years old, went from healthy and green to totally dead brown within a week or so. The Leylandii hedge in our garden is getting brown patches (it's a nice, neat hedge, I don't want to lose it and my neighbours all like it too). I've noticed that some sycamores are showing the shrivelled brown paper leaf look too.

Is there a widespread multi-species tree epidemic going on, masked by the fact that it's the beginning of autumn? It's been quite dry but not drought conditions, so I don't think it can be lack of water.

A lot of trees suffer serious root damage by utility companies laying pipework far too close - look for the tell-tale signs of patched trenches. Lots of trees compensate for the damage by throwing new growth lower down the trunk - it often takes several years for a tree to die and as a result those responsible aren't usually traced.

We have had a very dry spell since early June with little or no rain and this coupled with global warming will impact on plants at the marginal edge of their existence.

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Its Lord Mandelson's fault.

His presence in this country is turning sap into blood and leaves into little more than scorched suicide letters.

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Its Lord Mandelson's fault.

His presence in this country is turning to sap into blood and leaves into little more than scorched suicide letters.

Politicians and gardeners question time:

"Can the panel recommend a way to ensure my phlox flower regularly?"

Well I think it's a matter of endogenous growth, so I'd stimulate the economy of the plant whilst aiming to keep public sector spending tightly controlled.

Do you keep it in a shady spot?

Is it on a bank?

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It's been a particularly dry summer and water tables are way down. Good news for me living in a 300 year old pile of blotting paper,bad news for trees.

:blink:

****** me. You must be living in a lucky part of the UK !! Well apart from the water tables and all..

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Errr...I can assure you that the period between June and early September was anything but dry in the Midlands.

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I'm in South West. Although the ground is beginning to dry - grass going slightly brown in places, but not as much as most years.

And....has anyone else noticed it's yet another year with very few wasps? I think it's about 4 years now since we had a noticeable wasp season.

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And....has anyone else noticed it's yet another year with very few wasps? I think it's about 4 years now since we had a noticeable wasp season.

Loads of the buggers around a couple of weeks ago, in fact I got stung for the first time in years. Not seen many around for the last week or so though.

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I'm in South West. Although the ground is beginning to dry - grass going slightly brown in places, but not as much as most years.

And....has anyone else noticed it's yet another year with very few wasps? I think it's about 4 years now since we had a noticeable wasp season.

Loads in Dorset when I was on holiday. Get away from my Pimms gaarrrgh !

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Its Lord Mandelson's fault.

His presence in this country is turning sap into blood and leaves into little more than scorched suicide letters.

He IS the Witch King of Hartlepool, after all.

As well as plants dying, expect civilizations to crash and fell creatures to roam the night.

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He IS the Witch King of Hartlepool, after all.

As well as plants dying, expect civilizations to crash and fell creatures to roam the night.

Argh! Amy Winehouse!

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:blink:

****** me. You must be living in a lucky part of the UK !! Well apart from the water tables and all..

East Anglia has been dry - ground is bone dry right now.

The leaves will fall early if the summer has been dry

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:blink:

****** me. You must be living in a lucky part of the UK !! Well apart from the water tables and all..

Yeah, they must be in Kent, where they have had scorched lawn grass. Us 'ere int' South West have been 'persisted' down on, all summer. :rolleyes:

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It's been a particularly dry summer and water tables are way down. Good news for me living in a 300 year old pile of blotting paper,bad news for trees.

Ahem, my family farm's water table is higher than it has been for years and years and years. End-of-winter levels. (this is in Wales).

OP, have you had any strong winds recently, do you live near the sea?

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Painful, isn't it?

Yes it is. It wasn't as bad as the time I was stung on the inside of my lip after swigging orange juice straight from the carton...that stung enough believe me.

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