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Average Size For 2 Bed Flat

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Can anyone tell me the average floorplan space for a 2 bed flat. (kitchen, lounge, 2 bedrooms, bathrrom etc)

800m2 or something like that.

Would be appreciated...

Average floor space for a flat is 70 m2 - although, that is an overall average of all flats, which works out an average of about 1.7 bedrooms.

In addition, there is considerable variability due to age - older properties are considerably larger, with new-builds being slightly larger than pre-2000s (the difference has been a tendency to include en-suite bathrooms in 2 bed flats, requiring a larger floor area, but reducing the available non-bathroom living area). Average size of all new builds in the UK is 74 m2 (and that includes houses, not just flats).

There's a really interseting report on this by the royal institute of british architects discussing some of the reasons for this.

Housing space standards: a national perspective

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Average floor space for a flat is 70 m2 - although, that is an overall average of all flats, which works out an average of about 1.7 bedrooms.

You want space, go for a flat in a large Victorian house. There are alternatives in some areas: for example, regency, but in most of the country Victorian is the best available unless you're a multi-millionaire.

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All my family are in the UK and I have lived in the US for the past 13 years. Both my brother and I are at that stage in our lives when we have bought houses. Everytime my brother asks how big my house is I tell him in square feet. But he always wants to know how many bedrooms it has. I tell him but also state it doesn't matter that much because you can always redesign from the inside but short of an extension cannot change the square footage.

When I ask him about the size of his house we have the reverse conversation. Even after buying a place he has no idea how big or small it actually is. All he knows is how many bedrooms it has! I kept telling him he should ask for this information when he was looking but all he said was that they don't do things like that in England. I can't help but think that people are getting ripped off and this is THE major contributor to what appears to me to be very small new builds in the UK.

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All my family are in the UK and I have lived in the US for the past 13 years. Both my brother and I are at that stage in our lives when we have bought houses. Everytime my brother asks how big my house is I tell him in square feet. But he always wants to know how many bedrooms it has. I tell him but also state it doesn't matter that much because you can always redesign from the inside but short of an extension cannot change the square footage.

When I ask him about the size of his house we have the reverse conversation. Even after buying a place he has no idea how big or small it actually is. All he knows is how many bedrooms it has! I kept telling him he should ask for this information when he was looking but all he said was that they don't do things like that in England. I can't help but think that people are getting ripped off and this is THE major contributor to what appears to me to be very small new builds in the UK.

Quoting overall size is beginning to catch on in the UK: you see it sometimes at rightmove et al.

I remember it from many years ago when house-hunting in Germany. There you'd describe the flat I got as "2 1/2 rooms, 79 sq m plus two balconies". The number of rooms and floorsize are both quoted, and small rooms (that a typical London landlord would describe as "large double" if they didn't subdivide them) were counted as half a room.

[1] Two bedrooms and the living room. Kitchen, bathroom and loo don't get counted in that.

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Average floor space for a flat is 70 m2 - although, that is an overall average of all flats, which works out an average of about 1.7 bedrooms.

Average size for a small estate of very-slightly-posher-than-average 1990's built 3 bed semis round our way is 69 m2 (755sq ft) each. Detatched 4 bed are only 20% larger. My 55m2 2 bed flat (200 year old) somehow feels more spacious than any of the above, so layout / room size is definitely an important factor too.

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many new places are so small that carrying a shopping bag in each hand is a danger to the walls of the hallway.

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All my family are in the UK and I have lived in the US for the past 13 years. Both my brother and I are at that stage in our lives when we have bought houses. Everytime my brother asks how big my house is I tell him in square feet. But he always wants to know how many bedrooms it has. I tell him but also state it doesn't matter that much because you can always redesign from the inside but short of an extension cannot change the square footage.

When I ask him about the size of his house we have the reverse conversation. Even after buying a place he has no idea how big or small it actually is. All he knows is how many bedrooms it has! I kept telling him he should ask for this information when he was looking but all he said was that they don't do things like that in England. I can't help but think that people are getting ripped off and this is THE major contributor to what appears to me to be very small new builds in the UK.

It is a pain, but any houses I am interested in I drawn a floor plan (if one is not available) and work it out myself.

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I've bought and rented a few flats in my time, and it infuriates me when estate agents fail to put the square footage of the flat on the schedule/particulars. I'd say a 1 bed is normally between 500 and 650 sq ft and 2 bed 600 to 850 sq ft.

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Disagree

Studios 300sq. ft

1 bed 350-450 sq. ft

2 bed 500-650 sq ft

Yet to see anything larger

650 sq ft is perfectly adequate for 2 bed. Recently I saw new built 2 bed bungalow in MK , 375 sq ft for 159K. Not kidding.

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You want space, go for a flat in a large Victorian house. There are alternatives in some areas: for example, regency, but in most of the country Victorian is the best available unless you're a multi-millionaire.

You want space, go for a flat in a different country. Almost any different country.

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60 sqm will give 2 reasonably sized double rooms and a good sized kitchen and separate lounge.

A good thing about older conversions is that they tend to have higher ceilings.

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A good thing about older conversions is that they tend to have higher ceilings.

Which is good because you can build platforms and double the floor space?

We've only viewed houses. Viewed on where the door didn't shut in the little bedroom because there was a bed in the way. Another woman said that you could put a wardrobe in the little bedroom if you took the door off.

Oh how we laughed.

Mind you she was the woman who said she never used the gas fire in the front room as it was too expensive.

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Which is good because you can build platforms and double the floor space?

We've only viewed houses. Viewed on where the door didn't shut in the little bedroom because there was a bed in the way. Another woman said that you could put a wardrobe in the little bedroom if you took the door off.

Oh how we laughed.

Mind you she was the woman who said she never used the gas fire in the front room as it was too expensive.

PM me for your Mezzanine floor quote!

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Disagree

Studios 300sq. ft

1 bed 350-450 sq. ft

2 bed 500-650 sq ft

Yet to see anything larger

650 sq ft is perfectly adequate for 2 bed. Recently I saw new built 2 bed bungalow in MK , 375 sq ft for 159K. Not kidding.

I'd agree... flat sizes especially new builds are smaller than you think.... the only flat I have is a victorian mansion flat which is three beds and 1 recep and is 1300 sq ft... that feels spacious...

Size is another reason of the very many not to touch a new build if your life depended on it... flat or house... for your own wealth and well being .. don't do it.... it's more stupid than buying a house in june 2007.

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I'd agree... flat sizes especially new builds are smaller than you think.... the only flat I have is a victorian mansion flat which is three beds and 1 recep and is 1300 sq ft... that feels spacious...

Size is another reason of the very many not to touch a new build if your life depended on it... flat or house... for your own wealth and well being .. don't do it.... it's more stupid than buying a house in june 2007.

I agree too...too small a place is no place to live with 2 adults, tired with work and baby at home...its a surefire fight causer....add in money worries and small flats are a human rights disgrace.

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Can anyone tell me the average floorplan space for a 2 bed flat. (kitchen, lounge, 2 bedrooms, bathrrom etc)

800m2 or something like that.

Would be appreciated...

Depends which country.

Here in Hong Kong the average flat (for say a family of say 4 or 5) is 750ft²

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Depends which country.

Here in Hong Kong the average flat (for say a family of say 4 or 5) is 750ft²

in English size terms thats about 1500 sq ft. Chinese are tiny.

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I'm sure many of you will have already seen this:

http://www.cabe.org.uk/press-releases/new-...r-everyday-life

New homes are too small for everyday life, say residents

11 August 2009

Jane Barraclough, 020 7070 6771, jbarraclough@cabe.org.uk

New homes are failing to provide enough space for everyday activities, according to new research conducted with the owners of 2,500 private new homes.

The findings, published in CABE’s Space in new homes: what residents think, revealed that private homes do not provide enough space to prepare food easily, have friends round for dinner or find a quiet place to relax. All of the residents surveyed lived in homes that had been built between 2003 and 2006 and they included flats, houses and bungalows.

The findings showed that in all households:

Forty four per cent said that there wasn’t enough space for small children to play safely in the kitchen while meals are being prepared;

Forty seven per cent don’t have enough space for all the furniture they have, or would like to have;

Thirty five per cent said they didn’t have enough kitchen space for the appliances they need, such as a toaster or a microwave;

Thirty seven per cent said they or their children do not have enough space to entertain guests privately;

Fifty seven per cent don’t have enough storage; and

Seventy two per cent said they did not have enough space for the three small bins required to recycle properly.

In fully occupied properties the situation is worse - for instance, 58 per cent don’t have enough space for all the furniture they have, or would like to have. A fully occupied home is one where the number of bed spaces matches the number of inhabitants aged ten or over. A single bedroom counts as one bed space and double bed as two. The fact that 90 per cent of the homes surveyed had a spare bedroom adds extra weight to this research.

The research points to lower-income households suffering from more of the problems associated with a lack of space than wealthier households. This in turn may impact upon health and educational attainment.

Richard Simmons, CABE chief executive, comments: ‘This research brings into question the argument that the market will meet the demands of people living in private housing developments. We need local planning authorities to ensure much higher space standards before giving developments the go-ahead.’

CABE believes that the implications of these findings are wide-reaching. Increased space in homes has direct implications for national policy priorities such as health and well-being, education and recycling. For example, dining as a family could encourage healthier eating habits and stronger family relationships. Children without space to entertain friends will do so outside the home, beyond parental supervision. Privacy at home is vital too - there are links between lack of space and mental health and well-being.

The government’s 2007 Waste Strategy for England includes a target for 40 per cent of household waste to be recycled by 2010. Without the space for waste separation such targets will be very hard to meet.

CABE recommends that local authorities should use their existing powers to only approve developments that include sufficient space in new homes. CABE also believes that private housebuilders and estate agents should provide better information for buyers about space, using net floor area rather than the number of rooms; and that the Homes and Communities Agency should seize the opportunity to produce new cross agency standards for space.

Notes for editors

The research was jointly commissioned by CABE and English Partnerships, with RIBA to explore residents’ views on the adequacy of internal space in their homes. HATC Ltd. commissioned Ipsos MORI to undertake a self-completed postal survey, asking residents about the space available to them for performing everyday activities at home. Questionnaires were sent out to homes built between January 2003 and 2006 in London or within one hour’s travel distance from London. 2,488 were completed.

Minimum space standards have been enforced in social housing and for development on publicly owned land for many years. Both the Homes and Communities Agency set and enforce minimum requirements on all housing schemes that they funded. The Greater London Authority is currently developing policies for minimum space standards in public housing provision in the capital and a number of planning authorities have already adopted their own space standards for both social and market housing.

CABE is the government’s advisor on architecture, urban design and public space, and design reviews about 350 schemes a year. As a public body, we encourage policymakers to create places that work for people. We help local planners apply national design policy and offer expert advice to developers and architects. We show public sector clients how to commission buildings that meet the needs of their users. And we seek to inspire the public to demand more from their buildings and spaces. Advising, influencing and inspiring, we work to create well-designed, welcoming places.

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I've viewed 1 beds from 300 sq ft to 1,000 sq ft in my time. I generally consider 500 sq ft to be the livable minimum, but you pay a premium for that in Central London. Even so, my 550 sq ft 1 bed flat doesn't have space for a separate kitchen.

Edit

I wouldn't buy a 2 bed under about 700 sq ft.

Edited by RealtyFisch

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PM me for your Mezzanine floor quote!

So what's to stop you mezzanining a normal house? OK you'd only be able to house dwarfs [1]

If you've ever noticed the heat rises to the ceiling and that would be the warmest part of the room. Why we insist on having tall rooms at all I don't know.

[1] All references to dwarfs in jest only and no offence intended to people of restricted height.

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Didn't brimingham council the other day reject the "opportunity" to take on some of the flats currently unsold but previously on the market to the BTL brigade as executive love hutches or some such.

the council I think described them as being unfit for their tenants..... says all you need to know about new builds I think.

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Disagree

Studios 300sq. ft

1 bed 350-450 sq. ft

2 bed 500-650 sq ft

Yet to see anything larger

650 sq ft is perfectly adequate for 2 bed. Recently I saw new built 2 bed bungalow in MK , 375 sq ft for 159K. Not kidding.

I rented a bungalow previouse that was about 400sq ft, 2 bedrooms. It had about 12 sqft hallways connecting the rooms. Its not a problem if you take it for what it is.

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