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If The Public Sector Went On Strike...


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As a single parent with a school age child, I'd have major problems if the teachers went on strike. I'd have to either stop working (I'm self-employed) or pay for expensive child care. Not to mention the effect on my son's education.

May I suggest - are there neighbours you could sort an arrangement out with, or perhaps family? Everyone would be in the same boat and maybe a lady down the road would fancy earning a bit of money that way - or just people rally round to help each other?

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Is there a better version of that anywhere i.e. one that scales so I can actually read it?

Thanks

Andy

This is a much better version of the UK public spending map:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/interac...g-larry-elliott

You can also download the pdf from that page.

The thing that strikes me about it is how little we actually spend on the kind of thing that gets Daily Mail readers' blood up as a proportion of the total. I'm not saying there's no scope for cuts, no doubt there is, but on the whole it looks reasonably well organised. How efficiently the money is actually spent is another question of course.

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May I suggest - are there neighbours you could sort an arrangement out with, or perhaps family? Everyone would be in the same boat and maybe a lady down the road would fancy earning a bit of money that way - or just people rally round to help each other?

Oh, I guess there are other possibilities, though it wouldn't be that easy. All of my family and most of my neighbours are in full-time employment themselves, and as for the ones that aren't - well, I'm not sure I'd necessarily want to entrust the care of my 5 year old son to them, or, indeed, that they would want to do it.

I'm sure we'd find a way to muddle though somehow, but to say, as some have done, that we wouldn't notice the effects of a public sector strike is simply ludicrous.

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Because it shows that asset class is overvalued, and will likely drop in value to restore the yield to something normal.

Only if you have a time machine and can choose to buy the house now at it's historic value.

In reality, right now, he can sell for a profit, and invest in something safer that has a higher yield. Like government bonds. No brainer.

So bearing this in mind, if all landlords like mine sell up, prices will drop... Which is very relevant for me!

He actually brought in the 1960s for £4000!, so his 'historic' yield for this year is 270%! But he could have sold in 2007 for 500k, bagging a £496,000 profit in one month.

Or if he wanted the income as you say, he could use the proceeds to buy a 20Y gilt that was yielding 5%, paying him a monthly cash income of £2,067 risk free, with zero costs, and zero hassle, guaranteed by every taxpayer in the land!

My type of landlord where stupid not to sell. Their only upside was another boom on top of the biggest boom we've ever seen.

Don't want to hijack the thread, but would you be happy if an ex-BTL'r had a sig something along the lines of "Bought my portfolio in 1999, sucked the renting mugs dry to pay off the mortgages, sold in 2007 at 3x the original purchase price. Thanks sucka's!"?

Want happens if your LL does decide to sell and retire to the Phillipines? Your ass is on the pavement my son!

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Your financial situation is completely independent of his.
To make a market you need two people, a buyer (me) and a seller (private or landlord). My financial situation is dominated by the price of houses. That price is dictated by the financial situation of both counterparties.

So I couldn't disagree more. What do you think caused the crash? The financial situations of both counterparties changed. Some people couldn't remortgage cheaply. Buyers could borrow less than before.

Overall the market clearing price is set in such a way as to balance the financial situations of the counterparties.

If you think the price is indepent of the the financial situations of the counterparties you are clearly mad!

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No, I use the A&E as it has a monopoly.

I can afford it and would prefer to pay for my own treatment. I'd also add it does work in America. Insurance would be higher, probably 3 times a shigh, but to me the sacrifice is worth it for the increased efficiency.

The NHS is not all that.

So you agree that private health care costs would rocket if the NHS was scrapped?

And 60 million Americans (including Obama) think it doesn't work there.

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To make a market you need two people, a buyer (me) and a seller (private or landlord). My financial situation is dominated by the price of houses. That price is dictated by the financial situation of both counterparties.

So I couldn't disagree more. What do you think caused the crash? The financial situations of both counterparties changed. Some people couldn't remortgage cheaply. Buyers could borrow less than before.

Overall the market clearing price is set in such a way as to balance the financial situations of the counterparties.

If you think the price is indepent of the the financial situations of the counterparties you are clearly mad!

You're talking generalities here. Of course the price is set by the balance of the counter parties. However what I was taking exception to is that you compare your financial wellbeing to a single individuals wellbeing as if his financial situation makes you better off.

Whether your landlord paid £4000 or £400,000 for the house you currently rent is irrelevant to your financial situation.

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what I was taking exception to is that you compare your financial wellbeing to a single individuals wellbeing as if his financial situation makes you better off.
As you say I'm using it as an example to illustrate a generally stupid situation. My landlord's rental yield is typical in London. QED.
Whether your landlord paid £4000 or £400,000 for the house you currently rent is irrelevant to your financial situation.
Absolutely right. All you should care about is the current yield on the current market value of your assets, and compare this to the opportunity cost... e.g. of buying gilts instead.

If you made money in capital appriciation in previous years, you should write to P&L at the time.

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As you say I'm using it as an example to illustrate a generally stupid situation. My landlord's rental yield is typical in London. QED.

Absolutely right. All you should care about is the current yield on the current market value of your assets, and compare this to the opportunity cost... e.g. of buying gilts instead.

If you made money in capital appriciation in previous years, you should write to P&L at the time.

So to conclude. You'd suggest that the majority of landlords should sell to crystallise gains (for them). This should therefore decrease the price of property (say by 10%). But equally decrease the stock available to rent. Ceteris paribus rental prices would increase. Equilibrium being where selling prices have fallen so that the new increased rental contracts result in a 7% yield.

Unless you buy you are therefore even worse off as instead of paying £1350 per month you now have to find £1600 (approx).

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I'm sure we'd find a way to muddle though somehow, but to say, as some have done, that we wouldn't notice the effects of a public sector strike is simply ludicrous.

To say YOU wouldnt notice is ludicrous, to say I wouldnt notice is a fact. But Im glad you appreciate all the services I pay for and never wanted or use. <_<

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Guest absolutezero
I can't wait to the Dormouse Preservation Officer having to fend for themselves. I'm sure some neighbours can get together to preserve their own dormice if the mean so much to them. If we used to pay these people 25k, (as I remember from the job advert), then we can put them on jobseekers allowance and save a bundle. Who knows, they might get a job in pet shop or something!

Please tell me you made that job up. :blink:

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Nop, sorry, it was for Bath County Council ! Around 22k or thereabouts depending on experience, as I remember. it was on HPC a while ago.
Actually that must have been the full time job, but you can do part-time for 10k

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2005/oct/14/p...localgovernment

Bath and North East Somerset council, already under fire for overspending, is advertising a £10,000-a-year part-time job as a dormouse officer, whose duties would include "supporting communities, groups and individuals to identify, look after and celebrate dormouse heritage".
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Nop, sorry, it was for Bath County Council ! Around 22k or thereabouts depending on experience, as I remember. it was on HPC a while ago.
Actually that must have been the full time job, but you can do part-time for 10k

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2005/oct/14/p...localgovernment

Bath and North East Somerset council, already under fire for overspending, is advertising a £10,000-a-year part-time job as a dormouse officer, whose duties would include "supporting communities, groups and individuals to identify, look after and celebrate dormouse heritage".
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Fur flies over dormouse officer

The post is a part of a joint project with English Nature

Plans to hire a dormouse conservation officer for the Bath area are being condemned as a waste of money.

The part-time position is being advertised by Bath and North East Somerset (Banes) council with a pro rata salary of up to £21,500.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/somerset/4337196.stm

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:lol:

Remember when the (private) tanker drivers went on strike for a few days a bit back. The country was on its knees in about.... a day.

Only reason you'd ever notice the public sector striking is because of their monopoly.

On the subject of technological advancement most of the actual innovation comes from the private sector. The government sponsored scientific effort is the equivalent of throwing mud at a blanket in the hope that some sticks. With a huge blanket, and lots of mud.

Those tanker drivers used to be public sector before bp was privatized.. :P:P

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Working in the public sector is the same as being on benefits, except you are of less benefit to society. That's why people who could earn more in the public sector choose to actually work in the private sector. They can feel like they are actually contributing, sleep better at night and are not surrounded by inefficiency and idiocy day in day out.

I must try working in the public sector, because you description sounds exactly like every private sector job I have had (Software Engineer/Programmer)

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Edit: I'd rather save them than the banksters!

ex-fukin-zacterly

What a bunch of miserable philestines are the whiners on this thread. For gods' sake, do you value nothing and decry and villify any attempts to actually try to make the world a slightly less grim place ? A dormouse officer looks like one of the better uses of cash - far better than some slimy twunt of a banker's bonus, and more useful to the world in general than the pay of a McD's operative

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  • 441 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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