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If The Public Sector Went On Strike...


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You would if a 4 hour wait in A&E became 4 days.

Strained my achilles tendon and although I have private medical insurance, was told I needed to go to A&E who'd refer me. Despite telling the staff all I needed was a referel, was kept there for 6 hours as my cases wasn't deemed serious enough. Got my referel, and next to f' all else, phoned the local private hospital and had an operation 4 days later.

I was told the op, as not urgent treatment, would have taken 18 months on NHS. So I have had my quality of life enhanced by paying £1600 a year (for my whole family). as far as I am concerned, the NHS could burn down and I wouldn't give a flying ruck.

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Strained my achilles tendon and although I have private medical insurance, was told I needed to go to A&E who'd refer me. Despite telling the staff all I needed was a referel, was kept there for 6 hours as my cases wasn't deemed serious enough. Got my referel, and next to f' all else, phoned the local private hospital and had an operation 4 days later.

I was told the op, as not urgent treatment, would have taken 18 months on NHS. So I have had my quality of life enhanced by paying £1600 a year (for my whole family). as far as I am concerned, the NHS could burn down and I wouldn't give a flying ruck.

But you still use the NHS A&E if you have an emergency.

Private health care is a parasite on the NHS at present - the NHS trains the consultants, then they go and use these skills on private patients, often in NHS time.

If the NHS 'burned down' the cost of private health care would rocket as its NHS subsidy would no longer exist!

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Roughly speaking I'd say 60% of public sector workers are 'key' workers that we would sorely miss. (Doctors, nurses, firemen, front line staff). The other 40% could probably be made redundant without any drop in the main services.

- corrected for you

that seems to be about right from my insider observations

My place is cutting approx 2000 jobs over the next few years - and they are getting private consultants in to tell them who to get rid of!! :lol: (I reckon i could do the same job in a day or two - unfortunately one of them would be me)

As for the NHS, all you need to do is look at the NHS jobs site, where there are literally 100's of new jobs a day advertised, of which I reckon 50% have nothing to do with front line service delivery - this is why the budget has doubled

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But you still use the NHS A&E if you have an emergency.

Private health care is a parasite on the NHS at present - the NHS trains the consultants, then they go and use these skills on private patients, often in NHS time.

If the NHS 'burned down' the cost of private health care would rocket as its NHS subsidy would no longer exist!

No, I use the A&E as it has a monopoly.

I can afford it and would prefer to pay for my own treatment. I'd also add it does work in America. Insurance would be higher, probably 3 times a shigh, but to me the sacrifice is worth it for the increased efficiency.

The NHS is not all that.

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Strained my achilles tendon and although I have private medical insurance, was told I needed to go to A&E who'd refer me. Despite telling the staff all I needed was a referel, was kept there for 6 hours as my cases wasn't deemed serious enough.
You should have gone to a private A&E:

http://www.casualtyplus.co.uk/page.php?n=40

"The company behind the unit, due to open in October, believes there will be more than enough people willing to pay to avoid the lengthy waits in NHS A&E departments."

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You should have gone to a private A&E:

http://www.casualtyplus.co.uk/page.php?n=40

"The company behind the unit, due to open in October, believes there will be more than enough people willing to pay to avoid the lengthy waits in NHS A&E departments."

Thanks for the link; if there was one in my area, I'd use it in a blink. A friend of mine cut his hand open cleaning a very sharp knife his wife had put in the washing up bowl, hidden by foam. He entered A&E at 7AM and got home at 2pm. all they did was wrap his hand up tightly and told him to wait for a doctor to see him.

That's just unacceptable...

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Yes, we've all been f****d by the financial industry (PRIVATE SECTOR!)

whom the govt (public sector) managed to get in a huge lot of debt to because they thought the boom was real

And now they want far more taxes from me and my children than the bankers. scum.

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I can afford it and would prefer to pay for my own treatment. I'd also add it does work in America. Insurance would be higher, probably 3 times a shigh, but to me the sacrifice is worth it for the increased efficiency.

Only double actually!:

Country Spend on health (%of GDP)

US 16% (medicare + medicaid + private)

French 11% reckoned to be one of the best in the world, a mixe of pulblic & private providers via compulsory health insurance. It's not a single-payer system like the

UK 8% (NHS)

IMO it seems like a compulsory health insurance model works best. (if you can't pay it the government susidises it for you). This way you have the best of both worlds - real competition amongst hostipals and A&Es, so reducing waste, whilst retaining the social model of healthcare for all.

The open market insurance in the US is often abused - people get CT scans every 5 minutes so the hospital can charge the insurer!

Or the Swiss system:

The insured person has full freedom of choice among the recognised healthcare providers competent to treat their condition (in his region) on the understanding that the costs are covered by the insurance up to the level of the official tariff. There is freedom of choice when selecting an insurance company (provided it is an officially registered caisse-maladie or a private insurance company authorised by the Federal Act) to which one pays a premium, usually on a monthly basis.

Overall I think for our 8% of GDP, our health care should be better than it currently is.

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I'd only notice if the private sector went on strike if the supermarket shut. I don't need nuffin else from it.

:lol:

Remember when the (private) tanker drivers went on strike for a few days a bit back. The country was on its knees in about.... a day.

Only reason you'd ever notice the public sector striking is because of their monopoly.

On the subject of technological advancement most of the actual innovation comes from the private sector. The government sponsored scientific effort is the equivalent of throwing mud at a blanket in the hope that some sticks. With a huge blanket, and lots of mud.

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The government sponsored scientific effort is the equivalent of throwing mud at a blanket in the hope that some sticks. With a huge blanket, and lots of mud.
The exception that proves the rule:

The Nevis Engine, prototype internal combustion engine, can double BHP (or half petrol comsumption if you're a tree-hungger). Recently invented with a Italian government grant.

Not sure if it a flyer, but very interesting! Fill yer boots (if you could buy the shares) - this is where the private sector investment comes in...

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The exception that proves the rule:

The Nevis Engine, prototype internal combustion engine, can double BHP (or half petrol comsumption if you're a tree-hungger). Recently invented with a Italian government grant.

Not sure if it a flyer, but very interesting! Fill yer boots (if you could buy the shares) - this is where the private sector investment comes in...

fiat have always been pretty innovative (I guess it's them or related to them), in automotive of various kinds. still run a loss tho. and i bet govt-non-subsidised Merc, BMW etc do just as good r and d

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The exception that proves the rule:

The Nevis Engine, prototype internal combustion engine, can double BHP (or half petrol comsumption if you're a tree-hungger). Recently invented with a Italian government grant.

Not sure if it a flyer, but very interesting! Fill yer boots (if you could buy the shares) - this is where the private sector investment comes in...

Completely irrelevant to this thread but I just read your signature. Bug bear of mine. Why do you compare your financial situation in paying rent to you landlords financial situation?

Surely his finances are irrelevant to you? Supposing he bought the house for half it's current "value" doesn't that make it a relatively good investment at the moment? His income is increased by £1350 (less expenses) every month.

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Completely irrelevant to this thread but I just read your signature. Bug bear of mine. Why do you compare your financial situation in paying rent to you landlords financial situation?
Because it shows that asset class is overvalued, and will likely drop in value to restore the yield to something normal.
Surely his finances are irrelevant to you? Supposing he bought the house for half it's current "value" doesn't that make it a relatively good investment at the moment?
Only if you have a time machine and can choose to buy the house now at it's historic value.

In reality, right now, he can sell for a profit, and invest in something safer that has a higher yield. Like government bonds. No brainer.

So bearing this in mind, if all landlords like mine sell up, prices will drop... Which is very relevant for me!

His income is increased by £1350 (less expenses) every month.
He actually brought in the 1960s for £4000!, so his 'historic' yield for this year is 270%! But he could have sold in 2007 for 500k, bagging a £496,000 profit in one month.

Or if he wanted the income as you say, he could use the proceeds to buy a 20Y gilt that was yielding 5%, paying him a monthly cash income of £2,067 risk free, with zero costs, and zero hassle, guaranteed by every taxpayer in the land!

My type of landlord where stupid not to sell. Their only upside was another boom on top of the biggest boom we've ever seen.

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As a single parent with a school age child, I'd have major problems if the teachers went on strike. I'd have to either stop working (I'm self-employed) or pay for expensive child care. Not to mention the effect on my son's education.

Hmm, yes. He'd miss out on all that vital stuff about Mary Seacole, man made global warming, and the meaning of Divali... ;)

Has anyone attempted to get an idea of what the actual amount paid to 'non-jobs' actually is? I recall there was a huge list on here at one time of all the 'one legged tap dancing outreach coordinator' type jobs showing salaries.

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I recall there was a huge list on here at one time of all the 'one legged tap dancing outreach coordinator' type jobs showing salaries.

You mean the Taxpayer Alliance non-job of the week awards ?

e.g. 38,087 - £44,433 per annum plus £2,000 per annum London Weighting,RDA National Evaluation Manager, North West Development Agency

To programme manage and coordinate the implementation of the Impact Evaluation Framework and production of the next Regional Development Agency (RDA) Impact Report by the nine English RDAs and to work with RDA Evaluation leads to share best practice and improve and embed their approach to evaluation of programmes, projects and policies.

or

“Publicity Manager

£40,000 - £50,000

We need a creative and motivated person to run high profile campaigns that really make a difference for people in Surrey.

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As a single parent with a school age child, I'd have major problems if the teachers went on strike. I'd have to either stop working (I'm self-employed) or pay for expensive child care. Not to mention the effect on my son's education.

Yeah, but according to some of the fruit and nuts in this thread, you wouldn't notice. If the entire public sector was shut down tomorrow, it would be the birth of a wonderful free market age in which choice and competition drove up standards and cut prices for education, health, pensions, roads, environmental protection, the courts, police, fire, military etc etc. As we all know from dealing with the private sector, there is no chance that many of these activities would become organised in such a way as to screw as much money out of vulnerable people as possible by exploiting market imperfections while providing the minimum level of service. No indeed.

By the way, this is what we actually spend, make of it what you will:

guardian-graphic2-1023x685.png

Edited by bearly legal
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Because it shows that asset class is overvalued, and will likely drop in value to restore the yield to something normal.

Only if you have a time machine and can choose to buy the house now at it's historic value.

In reality, right now, he can sell for a profit, and invest in something safer that has a higher yield. Like government bonds. No brainer.

So bearing this in mind, if all landlords like mine sell up, prices will drop... Which is very relevant for me!

He actually brought in the 1960s for £4000!, so his 'historic' yield for this year is 270%! But he could have sold in 2007 for 500k, bagging a £496,000 profit in one month.

Or if he wanted the income as you say, he could use the proceeds to buy a 20Y gilt that was yielding 5%, paying him a monthly cash income of £2,067 risk free, with zero costs, and zero hassle, guaranteed by every taxpayer in the land!

My type of landlord where stupid not to sell. Their only upside was another boom on top of the biggest boom we've ever seen.

I agree with your synopsis of where your landlord has gone "wrong" assuming you know all of his personal details - but you don't. So his choice is his choice. Maybe he's planning on giving his house to children/ grandchildren in a few years time. Plus it's rather unfair to highlight, using hindsight, the highpoint of the market as the time when he should have sold.

Your financial situation is completely independent of his. His "bad" decisions are no help to you individually. The fact that he hasn't sold surely indicates that he won't. £16,200 rent each year.

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Yes, everybody knows that doctors, nurses, teachers, firemen, police etc don't actually do anything. The public sector is, by and large, fantastically good value. For £1500 per person per year we get a national health service which will provide you with any healthcare you need and never send you a bill. There is no way a private health system could do the same for that price.

So what happens to the rest of my taxes?

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