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Owners Of Uninsured Cars Face New Fines Under New Government Curbs

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/news/6...ment-curbs.html

Motorists who leave their cars uninsured face fines of up to £1,000 even if they are locked away in a garage or kept on a driveway.

Taxed but uninsured cars left on a public road could be clamped or seized under the new laws which are being unveiled by the Government.

The draconian new powers are intended to tackle an estimated two million uninsured motorists who, the Government says, are responsible for 160 deaths a year.

But the changes have angered civil liberty campaigners and also alarmed motoring groups who fear that law-abiding motorists could be penalised for innocent mistakes, such as allowing their insurance to lapse while they are on holiday.

At the moment, a motorist is only committing a crime if he or she drives while uninsured.

The new law will make it an offence to be the registered keeper of an uninsured car, whether or not the vehicle is being used and regardless of whether it has a valid tax disc or is kept on private property.

The only way to avoid a fine will be to go through the bureaucratic process of making a Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.

This can only be done if the owner can find somewhere to store the vehicle. Uninsured vehicles left in the road would be clamped or seized, penalising those without driveways or private garages.

Some have voiced concerns the scheme will do little to stop unscrupulous drivers who never bother to insure vehicles, but could instead hit law-abiding motorists who unwittingly allow their insurance to lapse when they are working abroad or taking a holiday. It will rely on the motor insurance industry database that is currently used by the police.

It looks like stealth fines are the way forward to increase revenue?

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Can't say I'm too fussed about people who are driving around uninsured getting fined or their vehicles crushed.

I don't think many of us would be too happy if an uninsured driver (they are often uninsured for a reason) hit and seriously injured loved one on a pedestrian crossing.

I would much rather see a crack down on uninsured drivers than people who don't have road tax, as insurance does serve a purpose, but road tax is just a revenue grab.

Why they don't include basic 3rd party cover in the road tax disc like some other European countries I'll never understand. :unsure:

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Can't say I'm too fussed about people who are driving around uninsured getting fined or their vehicles crushed.

I don't think many of us would be too happy if an uninsured driver (they are often uninsured for a reason) hit and seriously injured loved one on a pedestrian crossing.

I would much rather see a crack down on uninsured drivers than people who don't have road tax, as insurance does serve a purpose, but road tax is just a revenue grab.

Why they don't include basic 3rd party cover in the road tax disc like some other European countries I'll never understand. :unsure:

Because they are all on boards of insurance companies?

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Guest eight
So who is an uninsured driver and where are you likely to find him/her? Well, according to new statistics released by the Motor Insurer's Bureau it is more of an urban phenomenon than a rural one. Bradford emerges as the overall winner (or should we say loser) with three postcode entries in the top 10. In the BD3 area (Barkerend, Bradford Moor and Thornbury) a staggering two-thirds of car owners do not have insurance. That's six times the national average. In sixth place was the BD8 postcode. This includes the Girlington, Manningham and Lower Grange areas of Bradford where 51% of car owners do not possess an insurance policy. In BD9 39% of drivers are uninsured. In total, the West Midlands had six entries in the list.

What will be funny now is if someone comes along and accuses you of being racist, despite the fact they will have had to have drawn the same conclusions themselves to arrive at the accusation......

eight

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Can't say I'm too fussed about people who are driving around uninsured getting fined or their vehicles crushed.

I don't think many of us would be too happy if an uninsured driver (they are often uninsured for a reason) hit and seriously injured loved one on a pedestrian crossing.

I would much rather see a crack down on uninsured drivers than people who don't have road tax, as insurance does serve a purpose, but road tax is just a revenue grab.

Why they don't include basic 3rd party cover in the road tax disc like some other European countries I'll never understand. :unsure:

You lefties.

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You lefties.

Pragmatists more like ;)

If having it is statutory, and we (as insured drivers) will end up picking up the tab eventually, you might as well cut out the middle man and just pay up front.

It would also simply the process (and probably reduce the cost) of running a car for many younger drivers who don't want fire, theft or fully comprehensive insurance.

The real reason this happens is likely to be - as an earlier poster pointed out - the vested interests of the insurance companies.

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So, if someone dies and leaves a car as part of the estate and the insurance expires before probate is obained is that a quick £1,000 for the cyclopse?

Won't the insurance die with the person?

But it would come out of the estate?

Gawd knows.

but having to be SORN has been around for a long time.

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Pragmatists more like ;)

If having it is statutory, and we (as insured drivers) will end up picking up the tab eventually, you might as well cut out the middle man and just pay up front.

It would also simply the process (and probably reduce the cost) of running a car for many younger drivers who don't want fire, theft or fully comprehensive insurance.

The real reason this happens is likely to be - as an earlier poster pointed out - the vested interests of the insurance companies.

You mean no choice of insurer, just imposition by the state. You lefties.

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So, if someone dies and leaves a car as part of the estate and the insurance expires before probate is obained is that a quick £1,000 for the cyclopse?

No, you just complete a SORN - Statutory Off Road Notification - and return the one page (very simple) form telling the DVLA the vehicle is off the road until further notice. It's free.

Some people will fail to notice the tax / insurance is up though, and a fine will probably end up being issued, although I guess the person being fined is dead in this instance, so it won't trouble them too much.

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You mean no choice of insurer, just imposition by the state. You lefties.

The state would spread the 'joy' across a pool of insurers.

Most people would then top-up with theft (always required if you bought the car via credit of some sort), or fully comprehensive (often required if the car was purchased via a lease, etc. and not fully paid for).

If you accept that 3rd party insurance should be mandatory then it makes sense to combine it's administration with road tax.

If you don't accept that insurance should be mandatory, you are wasting my time and yours with a pointless argument.

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'... regardless of whether it has a valid tax disc or is kept on private property.'

Kinell. Great news for insurance companies and ex-ministers who will sit on their boards but another kick in the cobblers for the long-suffering citizenry.

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What will be funny now is if someone comes along and accuses you of being racist, despite the fact they will have had to have drawn the same conclusions themselves to arrive at the accusation......

eight

There may be a statistical correlation between failure to tax road vehicles and some characteristic of the local population - to say any more would be very dangerous. Perhaps the areas are so peaceful and the drivers so safe and curteous that the locals feel no need for insurance?

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The state would spread the 'joy' across a pool of insurers.

Most people would then top-up with theft (always required if you bought the car via credit of some sort), or fully comprehensive (often required if the car was purchased via a lease, etc. and not fully paid for).

If you accept that 3rd party insurance should be mandatory then it makes sense to combine it's administration with road tax.

If you don't accept that insurance should be mandatory, you are wasting my time and yours with a pointless argument.

It's all getting complicated now. You lefties.

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better to add it (the cost of compulsory third party insurance) to the cost of fuel because you have to have fuel (you can easily avoid road tax (no I haven't worked out what happens if a BILKer crashes into you)). It then acts as a further incentive to get a more economical car.

As for the Bradford postcodes, it's not a surprise. It's also not dissimilar in Wolverhampton, Blackburn, Leicester and E London. I am not going to draw any conclusions, but I suppose it may be possible to.

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4 years ago i was hit by an uninsured driver. it nearly wrote off the car due to the insurance not wanting to pay out, and took me 8 months to get the money, the uninsured driver fled the scene before the police got there (after telling me he had no insurance) and was never caught.

i don't have a problem with this at all, because as they say in the article:

The only way to avoid a fine will be to go through the bureaucratic process of making a Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.

if you have no intention to drive a car ie it is not insured, you wouldn't tax it. declaring sorn is 30mins in a post office or 5 mins online. hardly a big task... although i do think we should adopt systems that they have in other countries where the person is insured to drive, not a specific car. but then thats harder to fine and police ;)

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They love complication

Let's keep it simple.

We dismantle the state, drop any requirement for insurance and I run you over - proper like - and leave you to die squirming in agony from your injuries.

Your family die in abject poverty having lost the wage earner (although I do send a Christmas card every year with some soothing words).

Edited by redalert

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better to add it (the cost of compulsory third party insurance) to the cost of fuel because you have to have fuel (you can easily avoid road tax (no I haven't worked out what happens if a BILKer crashes into you)). It then acts as a further incentive to get a more economical car.

Yes, that's probably a better idea - it would mean that people who do high mileages pay proportionally more.

Only problem is if/when electric vehicles get popular.

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Only problem is if/when electric vehicles get popular.

agreed, but that won't be for bloody ages to be honest. Imagine how much the national grid would need to be upgraded to cope with the extra demand - and that's without millions of charging points (you can't realistically run cables from your house to the street and using lamp posts is a joke of an idea and many people don't have garages or off road parking).

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Only problem is if/when electric vehicles get popular.

agreed, but that won't be for bloody ages to be honest. Imagine how much the national grid would need to be upgraded to cope with the extra demand - and that's without millions of charging points (you can't realistically run cables from your house to the street and using lamp posts is a joke of an idea and many people don't have garages or off road parking).

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So, if someone dies and leaves a car as part of the estate and the insurance expires before probate is obained is that a quick £1,000 for the cyclopse?

Or a spell in hospital, called away on business for an unexpected time, anything really out of the ordinary, or just simply forgetting - ok you shouldn't but it does happen.

This is primarily targeted to catch the law-abiding, not to tackle the real problem - too difficult for that. Make a comparison with the fines for actually driving without insurance handed out by the courts.

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/news/6...ment-curbs.html

It looks like stealth fines are the way forward to increase revenue?

This is punishment for a thought crime. If you do not intend to use the car and its off the road until such time as it will be reinsured there should be no need to inure it against a liability that does not exist.

Let us hope the court of Human Rights straightens New Labour out on yet another big briother peiece of evil.

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