Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

0q0

Older Hpcers, Was Corporate Spelling Poor In The 40s And 50s?

Recommended Posts

Very common to see spelling errors in corporate Britain. Most weeks I see an error here or there on the news services, usually on a sub-title. Errors such as dependant instead of dependent are common, even Royal Mail can't get it right http://www.royalmail.com/portal/rm/content...ediaId=15500190

For social customers sending an item overseas - Social customers can claim the market value or replacement cost of the missing or damaged item dependant on the item being new or used.

Where has the education budget gone?

I first had suspicions of this when using a dating website where the advertisers' own words are unedited.

I would read the ad profile from people who had put their occupation as Teacher or College Lecturer and find they would frequently mis-spell and not even know the difference between your and you're.

It seems standards are getting lower and lower and yet they claim exam grades have never been higher.

We have a less well-educated generation teaching in our schools and universities, as far as I can tell. It seems true to say now that unless the student has a really strong will to learn on their own, as I did in the years after I left formal education, that no return to the levels of proficiency seen in former decades is likely to come about.

My education was fairly ordinary, yet I find that I am in a minority of native Brits that have a high standard of written English. That just should not be the case given what our tax pounds go on.

Under Labour education seems to be even worse than it was under the Tory cuts I suffered in the 1980s. Universities and employers testing newcomers will tell you fairly often the numeracy and literacy of applicants is anything from obviously incomplete to downright shameful and makes anyone with an ounce of common sense wonder how the exam grades were achieved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Very common to see spelling errors in corporate Britain. Most weeks I see an error here or there on the news services, usually on a sub-title. Errors such as dependant instead of dependent are common, even Royal Mail can't get it right http://www.royalmail.com/portal/rm/content...ediaId=15500190

Where has the education budget gone?

I first had suspicions of this when using a dating website where the advertisers' own words are unedited.

I would read the ad profile from people who had put their occupation as Teacher or College Lecturer and find they would frequently mis-spell and not even know the difference between your and you're.

It seems standards are getting lower and lower and yet they claim exam grades have never been higher.

We have a less well-educated generation teaching in our schools and universities, as far as I can tell. It seems true to say now that unless the student has a really strong will to learn on their own, as I did in the years after I left formal education, that no return to the levels of proficiency seen in former decades is likely to come about.

My education was fairly ordinary, yet I find that I am in a minority of native Brits that have a high standard of written English. That just should not be the case given what our tax pounds go on.

Under Labour education seems to be even worse than it was under the Tory cuts I suffered in the 1980s. Universities and employers testing newcomers will tell you fairly often the numeracy and literacy of applicants is anything from obviously incomplete to downright shameful and makes anyone with an ounce of common sense wonder how the exam grades were achieved.

I have highlighted your statement above, since I believe this is the key to real education: volition and self-motivation.

As a grammar school pupil (Very demanding school; Greek and Latin in the first few years), who started secondary education in 1953 - and thus started primary in 1946 - I would agree completely.

I served as a Secondary School County Council Co-Opted Governor just after the new Thatcherist regime of LMS (Local Management of Schools) was implemented in the early 1990s. It was a problem school and I was recruited by a County Councillor friend to assist with turning the school around.

Now logically, if kids are starting the 11+ syllabus in their first year of secondary school, it follows their education standard must be to at least to 11+: in this case, not at all. 90% of ALL new pupils hovered around 7 to 7+!

The school enjoyed the services of a superb remedial teacher who took the 90% for just six months; two hours twice per week; and in that six months, she had 90% of the 90% up to 12+ in terms of the essential core subjects: reading, writing, arithmetic, and comprehension.

The LEA (Local Education Authority) however suddenly decided to cut the budget; justification, "It was not required" !!!

The inescapable conclusion to this was that both Primary and Junior Schools in the main had failed and failed abysmally.

Some time after this I was asked to become a tenured External Examiner and Moderator to a local University Business School at MBA level: interesting!

The standard of Written English was again abysmal!

Quite a few years ago, an Oxford professor wrote an English grammar primer, as he was appalled at the lack of English skills of undergrads joining Oxford! And let's remember, these students were the crème de la crème........

In my everyday dealings with people and particularly large businesses each day, the standard of letters I receive are pathetic: incomplete sentences for example, lacking an active verb and often a subject and an object.

The secret to business documentation is communication: succinct, accurate and non-ambiguous.

Written English in business is an amazingly powerful tool.

Poorly written gobbledegook simply cheapens image and thus credibility and fails to powerfully convey desired messages and ethos.

Textspeek is increasingly common, with no capitalisation.

Perhaps the greatest gifts my school gave me were an appreciation of the English language, both the language and grammar itself and decent literature: and above all else, a foundation in Grecian Logic.

Today, however, kids are taught by rote and worse, multiple-choice approaches.

You know: "Two and Two are Four!"

"Why Miss?"

"Because they are; now shut up and get on with your work!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No doubt that it's worse. All-time favourites from my local Asda's (printed signs) include 'Rasers are now in the shampoo aisle' and 'New Zeeland Chedder'. (Both on the same day).

And a few years ago, every single trolley in the huge shop was carrying an ad for Pot Noodles: 'Snacking at it's most intense'. I was daft enough to write to Head Office about this - they brushed it off as 'poetic licence'.

Yesterday, on the back of a relatively new book jacket from a big publisher, I saw 'riviting'.

And around last Mothers' Day I saw a card saying, 'If Mum's Were Flowers, I'd Pick You.'

Not sure it's true that all children were so perfectly taught in the past, though.

Daisy Ashford (l881-1972) wrote her delightful little novel 'The Young Visiters' when she was about 11 and it was published with her own spelling and (lack of) punctuation intact.

"You look rather rash my dear your colors dont quite match your face.'

"It was a sumpshous spot all done up in gold with plenty of looking glasses.'

"Oh I see said the Earl but my own idear is that these things are as piffle before the wind."

"Take me back to the Gaierty hotel."

Not to mention the delicious:

"Mr Salteena was an elderly man of 42."

:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the standard of written English has declined. Here are my main theories as to the cause:

1. Relativism in education. There seems to be a widespread belief that there's no such thing as 'correct' spelling, grammar etc. People trot out the old adage 'yeah but language evolves' whenever you try to correct them.

2. Greater numbers of people in jobs that involve writing. In a service economy, most jobs will have some kind of clerical aspect to them; hence the greater likelihood of poor spellers.

2. Technology. Prior to the 1990s, if you wanted a printed sign, you went to a printer, whose livelihood depended on correct spelling. Similarly, a typist who could not spell would not last long. With the advent of DTP, anyone could print a 'professional' looking sign or document riddled with errors. The spread of digital communication has had this effect as well, with 'textspeak' etc and a confusion between written and spoken English. Emails compound the problem, because they are instantaneous, making errors harder to spot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the standard of written English has declined. Here are my main theories as to the cause:

1. Relativism in education. There seems to be a widespread belief that there's no such thing as 'correct' spelling, grammar etc. People trot out the old adage 'yeah but language evolves' whenever you try to correct them.

2. Greater numbers of people in jobs that involve writing. In a service economy, most jobs will have some kind of clerical aspect to them; hence the greater likelihood of poor spellers.

Combine the 2 and you get the real answer - lots of thick teachers. People who struggled to pass Maths and Englisgh GCSEs, yet somehow got the magic PGCE and became teachers.

I realise this is not true for the majority but it must apply to many of the primary schools. Added to that we have the influx of EU and other legal migrants, plus the illegals' kids from god knows what third world country, and you have the dogs dinner that is today's education system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest absolutezero
Combine the 2 and you get the real answer - lots of thick teachers. People who struggled to pass Maths and Englisgh GCSEs, yet somehow got the magic PGCE and became teachers.

I realise this is not true for the majority but it must apply to many of the primary schools. Added to that we have the influx of EU and other legal migrants, plus the illegals' kids from god knows what third world country, and you have the dogs dinner that is today's education system.

I do despair at the quality of a lot of newer, younger teachers - some of them are bloody good though.

It comes to something when I have corrected the spelling on a poster that an English teacher has made.

And me, a science teacher!

Part of the problem is kids in the 80s didn't have their spelling corrected because it damaged self-esteem.

My spelling is perfect (my typing isn't necessarily so ;)).

I think I can spell properly because I read a lot as a child, which is something kids tend not to do these days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are right, such things are worse, but it is the consequence of an inflation in communication. So many people are writing so much and more of it goes uncorrected by another person. The medium has changed too. When I started work, letters were drafted in manuscript and typed by young women. Now I can send this with much less reflection and a greater chance of getting it rong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you very much to all of you who read my post and replied with their own thoughts on this. I very much enjoyed reading your posts, one of the best reads I've had in a while! It's good to know I'm not alone in my observations and that there are some pretty great and alike minds on the forum. By no means do I consider myself an academic, but I have noticed that even my own relatively standard level of literacy has these past 15 or 20 years come to be the exception rather than the rule (but believe me, I very much would like to be wrong on that).

TLB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   291 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.