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Injin

Labour Faces New Super Union Threat

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http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/poli...icle6835133.ece

The Labour Party could find itself beholden to a second super-union after it emerged that two of the party’s biggest donors are in merger talks, The Times can reveal.

Negotiations have begun to combine the GMB, the "general" union which represents blue-collar workers in companies such as Asda, and Unison, the public sector workers’ union, officials on both sides confirmed.

Such a move would create a single organisation with a combined annual income of over £260 million which, initially at least, would be Labour’s biggest donor.

A merger would give union officials bigger muscle in negotiations with companies and governments. But the move is likely to worry some elements in the Labour Party and will inevitably mean greater scrutiny over the extent the party’s policy agenda mirrors that of a particular donor. Senior members of the Labour Party are aware of the plans.

Paul Kenny, general secretary of the GMB, told The Times that the two organisations had a lot in common and already approached things in a similar manner. Their officials also often work together and believe their culture is broadly compatible. Asked directly about a merger, Mr Kenny said: "I would never rule it out."

The plan could, in the long run, be bad news for the Labour Party.

Seventy per cent of Labour funding is provided by 15 unions, but the bulk comes from four: Unite, which gave the party £6.17 million in 2007-08, Unison, which donated £5.3 million, the GMB, which gave £2.78 million, and the CWU, which donated £1.17 million.

A combined Unison-GMB would also have a majority of the votes in the union section of any leadership election. The general secretary of the new organisation could have a significant influence on the direction of the party.

Officials at the GMB and Unison have watched the troubled merger of Unite, the existing super-union and vowed not to repeat the same mistakes.

Unite, created in 2007 by combining Amicus and the T&G, has since maintained two separate headquarters half a mile away from one another in London and has joint general secretaries, one from each of its former wings.

Its two leaders have a notoriously bad relationship, prompting the union to be nicknamed "disUnite" by many.

A single general secretary will not be elected until next year, possibly before the general election.

Officials at Unison believe that in the event of a merger with the GMB, they would combine all their administrative and executive functions from the start to prevent similar infighting.

Fun times. :)

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Guest absolutezero
Course, it means there would be no longer any large scale private sector employment.

That's a shame, isn't it?

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That's a shame, isn't it?

Yes, the economy will completely collapse and if they don't knock it off millions will starve to death.

Edited by Injin

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Guest absolutezero
Yes, the economy will completely collapse and if they don't knock it off millions will starve to death.

State failure. You jizzing yourself yet?

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State failure. You jizzing yourself yet?

After watching Gordon do his dyspraxic scottish chairman mao bit I'm incredibly despondent, tbh.

This isn't just about state failure, this is also about state capture, a descent into totalitarianism. It's a race between violent lunacy and national bankrupcy and the good option is bankrupcy.

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Ha ha, even having to bump your own posts now injin?

NPD getting the better of you?

I thought we were supposed to have descended into violent chaos everywhere by now?! :lol:

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I wouldn't worry, the Unions are utterly irrelevent nowadays except in the public sector, which is itself is largely equally irrelevent.

When they close them down they'll go on strike. I always did enjoy that particular piece of intelligence.

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Guest absolutezero
I wouldn't worry, the Unions are utterly irrelevent nowadays except in the public sector, which is itself is largely equally irrelevent.

When they close them down they'll go on strike. I always did enjoy that particular piece of intelligence.

You're a full blown capitalist though, so I would expect you to say that.

Besides, I think you mean 'irrelevant'.

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Bad News for public sector workers if this does happen.

The GMB (boiler makers) were always the more sensible compared to Unison (formerly NALGO). Back in the mid 1990's loads of NALGO members defected to the GMB when NALGO became known as NOWGAY as it transformed from a trade union into a single interest campaign group - Union publications back to back gay and lesbian issues.

In general I would agree they are feckin useless from all angles. After my scam redundancy from local govt the Union was useless - so I researched the law, put in an unfair dismissal claim and won. :)

In the private sector now and would never ever go back unless starvation was the other choice.

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