Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Sybil13

Are Any Of You Aware Of The Implications Of Breaking An Energy Saving Light Bulb?

Recommended Posts

Don't want to come over as completely OTT but my daughter broke an energy saving light bulb tonight and I had NO IDEA about the dangers, never heard anything about what to do if you break one, nothing on the box.

Take a look at some of this stuff and tell me why we are not told about this?

Dangers of CFL Light Bulbs

Handle Those Bulbs with Caution

Spills Site Clean Up Disposal

We only read this stuff afterwards and don't know what to do to be honest.

Do we throw the hoover and washing machine out (hoovered up the breakage washed daughters clothes )?

Do we throw the carpet out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have 100 x 100W incandescent light bulbs arriving tomorrow in the post! Order them while you can. They're only 23p each.

Tut tut - they're "BAD" for the environment don't you know (unlike those mercury tainted energy saving light tubes)

ps: where did you get them from? :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Don't want to come over as completely OTT but my daughter broke an energy saving light bulb tonight and I had NO IDEA about the dangers, never heard anything about what to do if you break one, nothing on the box.

Take a look at some of this stuff and tell me why we are not told about this?

Dangers of CFL Light Bulbs

Handle Those Bulbs with Caution

Spills Site Clean Up Disposal

We only read this stuff afterwards and don't know what to do to be honest.

Do we throw the hoover and washing machine out (hoovered up the breakage washed daughters clothes )?

Do we throw the carpet out?

Oh and keep your thermometer out of reach of your daughter as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to add a sense of perspective:

The danger to children from broken energy-saving light bulbs is utterly insignificant compared to the brain damage that most of us older than 30 or so suffered during our childhoods as a result of the use of leaded petrol, which continued way longer than it should have done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just to add a sense of perspective:

The danger to children from broken energy-saving light bulbs is utterly insignificant compared to the brain damage that most of us older than 30 or so suffered during our childhoods as a result of the use of leaded petrol, which continued way longer than it should have done.

Not sure this is true. I always thought that unleaded petrol came out because it was cheaper to make (albeit damaging to engine life) and that the health and environmental benefits claimed were somewhat spurious. Happy to be enlightened however. Anyone out there work for BP?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh and keep your thermometer out of reach of your daughter as well.

Because we all have a mercury thermometer in every room and they're always breaking.

When my current stash of proper bulbs eventually runs out (10+ years) I will switch onto rough use bulbs, 59p plus VAT. These aren't going anywhere as they're not intended for normal domestic use and cannot be replaced with the flourescent ones.

http://www.lyco.co.uk/Light-Bulbs/Regular-...lbs/sc1340.aspx

I presume as they're rough use they will last longer, but as it will be Hobsons choice then no matter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh and keep your thermometer out of reach of your daughter as well.

I believe that they stopped using Mercury in domestic thermometers many years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Europe, all CFL lamps have to be disposed as special waste under EWC Code 20 01 21-Fluorescent tubes and other mercury-containing waste. Furthermore, as part of its obligations under the EU’s WEEE Directive1, the European lighting industry has set up a European-wide recycling infrastructure for all gas discharge lamps (including CFLs), capable of recycling mercury, as well as other metals, glass, etc. All CFL lamps are provided with the crossed-out wheeled dustbin logo, indicating that consumers should deposit the product separately, making use of the existing, local waste depots.

Follow these guidelines to dispose your CFL properly:

Like paint, batteries, thermostats, and other hazardous household items, CFLs should be disposed of properly.

Do not throw CFLs away in your household garbage if better disposal options exist.

If your local waste management agency offers no other disposal options except your household garbage, place the CFL in a plastic bag and seal it before putting it in the trash.

If your waste agency incinerates its garbage, you should search a wider geographic area for proper disposal options such as your local tip. Never send a CFL or other mercury containing product to an incinerator.

For more information about the WEEE directive and to contact your national ELC member partner see www.elcfed.org.com/weee

3.What should I do if I break a CFL lamp?

If you break a CFL, do not panic and take the following steps:

Ventilate the room for 20-30 minutes.

Use gloves to remove all the bits.

All the items used in cleaning up the spill should be treated as "universal waste" or disposed at your local lamp recycling point.

Remove all broken lamp components from the luminaire before reusing the luminaire.

ALWAYS switch off the mains before removing the remaining lamp components!

The original links I posted said the carpet and clothes should be thrown away along with the hoover if you hoovered up the fragments , do any of your energy bulbs say this on the box?

Do your boxes have a crossed out wheelie bin on them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh and keep your thermometer out of reach of your daughter as well.

Maybe all the mercury will react with the aliminuim waste they put in our drinking water and cal it floride.

Hittler and startlin both used floride to dump down populations but we don't get to read much about that in our history books do we.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we had mercury all over the desk at chemistry class....great to watch it flow and coagulate, bash it around with our rulers. oh how we laughed.

kids miss so much fun these days because of Elf and Safety

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not sure this is true. I always thought that unleaded petrol came out because it was cheaper to make (albeit damaging to engine life) and that the health and environmental benefits claimed were somewhat spurious. Happy to be enlightened however. Anyone out there work for BP?

Scraping the memory barrel to the dregs here, but ..

When the problem caused by atmospheric poisoning by lead was first mooted, the oil companies said:

1) It would be much too expensive to take the lead out of petrol, and the motorist would not stand for the increase in the price of fuel.

2) The lead was in such small quantities that it couldn't possibly make any difference to the atmosphere, and the science behind it was all bogus, and the (I think I have the right man) Derek Bryce-Smith in particular was a crank, if not a fraud.

3) The lead in petrol contributed so much to the performance of a car, that motorists would never consent to the sluggish performance to which they would be condemned, if the lead were taken out of petrol.

In the end they managed to take the lead out without it breaking the bank, as you can tell by comparing the cost of petrol in different countries all of which use unleaded petrol. They vary widely showing that taking the lead out of petrol is not a crucial price determinant.

They managed to improve the performance of engines, so that everything goes quite fast enough for most European and US road speed limits.

I have one friend who maintains that the crucial political events were the riots in the early 80s, which were fiercest in places where the young people involved had grown up closest to motorways - suggesting that lead in the atmosphere might have been a factor. This, he believes, is why the Thatcher government decided to pass legislation requiring the presence of unleaded petrol on the forecourt.

As you can see the cars are OK, and the oil companies are not suffering any more than the rest of us, and considerably less than most. Whether our health is better, I can't say. I seem to have got older since the 80s, but I'm not sure whether a cleaner atmosphere earlier would have slowed that down at bit. :)

db

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not sure this is true. I always thought that unleaded petrol came out because it was cheaper to make (albeit damaging to engine life) and that the health and environmental benefits claimed were somewhat spurious. Happy to be enlightened however. Anyone out there work for BP?

Unleaded petrol has benzine in it which can cause cancer if exposed to it at the pumps filling up. In the USA all the pumps have a vapour suck back device on the nozzles, nothing like that here. Also I read that if you are stuck in a jam in a petrol car the benzine can end up in the car to be breathed in by you. Another reason to get a diesel car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scraping the memory barrel to the dregs here, but ..

When the problem caused by atmospheric poisoning by lead was first mooted, the oil companies said:

1) It would be much too expensive to take the lead out of petrol, and the motorist would not stand for the increase in the price of fuel.

2) The lead was in such small quantities that it couldn't possibly make any difference to the atmosphere, and the science behind it was all bogus, and the (I think I have the right man) Derek Bryce-Smith in particular was a crank, if not a fraud.

3) The lead in petrol contributed so much to the performance of a car, that motorists would never consent to the sluggish performance to which they would be condemned, if the lead were taken out of petrol.

In the end they managed to take the lead out without it breaking the bank, as you can tell by comparing the cost of petrol in different countries all of which use unleaded petrol. They vary widely showing that taking the lead out of petrol is not a crucial price determinant.

They managed to improve the performance of engines, so that everything goes quite fast enough for most European and US road speed limits.

I have one friend who maintains that the crucial political events were the riots in the early 80s, which were fiercest in places where the young people involved had grown up closest to motorways - suggesting that lead in the atmosphere might have been a factor. This, he believes, is why the Thatcher government decided to pass legislation requiring the presence of unleaded petrol on the forecourt.

As you can see the cars are OK, and the oil companies are not suffering any more than the rest of us, and considerably less than most. Whether our health is better, I can't say. I seem to have got older since the 80s, but I'm not sure whether a cleaner atmosphere earlier would have slowed that down at bit. :)

db

Lead was only needed for engine protection when cast iron cylinder heads were used in pre 70s cars. The main purpose of lead was as a cheap octane booster. I'd say the advent of electronically controlled fuel injection and ignition, around the early 80s, plus the US CARB laws, gave the oil companies a chance to increase profits by removing the lead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last time I looked into the CFL-mercury issue, someone pointed out that, given that coal based generation chucks shed loads of mercury into the atmosphere, the use of CFLs results in a net reduction in mercury released into the environment.

I guess this maths doesn't apply in France (nuclear) or in the future when we move to renewable based generation. But for now in the UK, it's pretty sound.

On the micro, domestic level, it's a non-issue. Once we start getting het up about the rare breakages of sealed bulbs that pose a tiny risk of mercury release which, in turn, pose an infinitesimal risk of health damage, we are really heading down the health and safety madness route.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have 100 x 100W incandescent light bulbs arriving tomorrow in the post! Order them while you can. They're only 23p each.

They had the 40w and 60w one's on special offer at Tesco this week. 2 x packs of 3 for £2.

I backed up the truck, so should be ok for 10 years or so. By which time either everyone's dead from mercury poisoning or there's a chance the law will have changed.

As for the broken merc. one's, doesn't it say to return them to your MP for recycling on the side of the box? I'm sure I read that.............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
we had mercury all over the desk at chemistry class....great to watch it flow and coagulate, bash it around with our rulers. oh how we laughed.

kids miss so much fun these days because of Elf and Safety

You used rulers? We used our hands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   291 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.