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Mikhail Liebenstein

Linux Pc - Arm Cpu, Usb2 And Ge, 512mb In A Plug

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http://www.plugcomputer.org/

http://www.marvell.com/products/embedded_p...g/release/1308/

Ok, this appeals to the Geek in me. But Marvell have created a ARM based Linux PC that fits into a plug.

I'm not sure what, but surely something really cool can be done with this. At $99 I may just have to buy some to play with.

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Guest DisposableHeroes
http://www.plugcomputer.org/

http://www.marvell.com/products/embedded_p...g/release/1308/

Ok, this appeals to the Geek in me. But Marvell have created a ARM based Linux PC that fits into a plug.

I'm not sure what, but surely something really cool can be done with this. At $99 I may just have to buy some to play with.

I know exactly what you mean. I want one, but I haven't got a bloody clue what I would use it for.

I really wanted a netbook, but eventually realised I have a laptop so why do I need one.

The gadgetry pressure is immense...where's my credit card!

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I know exactly what you mean. I want one, but I haven't got a bloody clue what I would use it for.

I suppose the obvious uses is to use it for torrent downloads, network storage and networking a printer or two.

I've seen people discussing putting other programs on it (Squeezecenter for squeezeboxes seems to be a favourite) but I think the processor has some limitations when it comes to dealing with floating point calculations.

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Guest DisposableHeroes
I suppose the obvious uses is to use it for torrent downloads, network storage and networking a printer or two.

I've seen people discussing putting other programs on it (Squeezecenter for squeezeboxes seems to be a favourite) but I think the processor has some limitations when it comes to dealing with floating point calculations.

True, but they aren't really killer uses to justify £50-£60. A couple of months ago I saw a Acer One 120gb for £150, that seems better value (complete pc).

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True, but they aren't really killer uses to justify £50-£60. A couple of months ago I saw a Acer One 120gb for £150, that seems better value (complete pc).

these things move fast. the standard format for a wintel PC - albeit a slow one - may well be mains-plug in the coming years. ??

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My current favourite is this 1.6GHz Intel Atom thingy with 1GB memory. Difficult to resist, but I have no idea why.

500px-Fit-pc2-art-large.jpg

Reminds me of the old Sun Workstation LX which a few years ago I couldn't resist buying a ton of on Ebay :blink:

cimg751715.jpg

Thankfully I am now fully recovered from hoarding junk.

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these things move fast. the standard format for a wintel PC - albeit a slow one - may well be mains-plug in the coming years. ??

Is that before or after you put a 23kg heatsink and fan on it?

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Guest Skinty

I remember hearing about technology where you could communicate to devices around the house through the mains supply. I can't remember the name of it but it's not new technology. The place I was working at were thinking of using it as a way of controlling smart devices. This plug would have opened up many more options if we had gone down that road. The computational linguists were wanting to use voice control for interacting with your household objects.

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Guest DisposableHeroes
I remember hearing about technology where you could communicate to devices around the house through the mains supply. I can't remember the name of it but it's not new technology. The place I was working at were thinking of using it as a way of controlling smart devices. This plug would have opened up many more options if we had gone down that road. The computational linguists were wanting to use voice control for interacting with your household objects.

Yes I remember seeing those:

http://www.uk-surplus.com/solwise-pl-85pe-...r/prod_226.html

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Got them!

Just plugin and work a treat.

Virgin cable router downstairs, connected to homeplug adapter to my wireless network upstairs.

Wonder if my neighbours could log in, if they bought one?

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Got them!

Just plugin and work a treat.

Virgin cable router downstairs, connected to homeplug adapter to my wireless network upstairs.

Wonder if my neighbours could log in, if they bought one?

Nice and secure. No matter what pc being used, it has to be plugged it to the mains (No point using laptop batteries at home), so it sounds like a great idea. I'm surprised it hasn't taken off more. It was a little pricey at the start if I remember, but now!

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Got them!

Just plugin and work a treat.

Virgin cable router downstairs, connected to homeplug adapter to my wireless network upstairs.

Wonder if my neighbours could log in, if they bought one?

Think not - you can get them to communicate if they are on different circuits within the same house (personal experience) but I think the signal won't get across your distribution board. Incidentally, they don't like surge protected trailing sockets either, which is a bit of downer in my house.

Anyway the data is encrypted (at least on the devolo units I'm using) by the hardware, so you need to keep the security codes to hand (or find them on the bottom of the plug, which is in the one wall socket you don't use behind the filing cabinet).

Of course, if your wireless router is not secure then that's another hole into your system.

But it's a great system - I had to install it when the wireless signal from 8 feet below the router got just too flaky. Dug out the old plugs, and just put them in and it Just Works.

You ought to be able to use those to interface with a control unit for household gadgets, but I think I shall be looking at a rather more ambitious setup, so I can patch together the phone, intercom, door entry and remote camera - when we get a new house. I've been trying to find a suitable system in the UK, but the best bet still looks like a thing from the US - fortunately they do an export model for European voltages.

Gadget lovers might like to contemplate the Ennovah Q-26/IPC (top of the range model) at

Quantometrix Ennovah

A mere $700 - plus VAT and import duty.

Ah, techno-lust!

db

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I use a acer one that I bought of ebay, It had a broken screen and I only paid 60 quid for it...

1.6 atom, 160gb hd, 1gb ram, I've double sided it to the back of my monitor. Power consuption 40W

Its running XP, but easy to install any OS...

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Guest DisposableHeroes
I use a acer one that I bought of ebay, It had a broken screen and I only paid 60 quid for it...

1.6 atom, 160gb hd, 1gb ram, I've double sided it to the back of my monitor. Power consuption 40W

Its running XP, but easy to install any OS...

Great idea, brilliant for £60.

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http://www.plugcomputer.org/

http://www.marvell.com/products/embedded_p...g/release/1308/

Ok, this appeals to the Geek in me. But Marvell have created a ARM based Linux PC that fits into a plug.

I'm not sure what, but surely something really cool can be done with this. At $99 I may just have to buy some to play with.

Any spare small form factor PCs I have are used to run Skype and as an interconnected media server/hifi.

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I remember hearing about technology where you could communicate to devices around the house through the mains supply. I can't remember the name of it but it's not new technology.

Back in the 1970s my grandmother had a two-way intercom system with her neighbour that sent the signal through mains electricity cables rather than wirelessly.

My current favourite is this 1.6GHz Intel Atom thingy with 1GB memory. Difficult to resist, but I have no idea why.

It looks a sorely tempting piece of kit from a power consumption standpoint, but from the specs it appears to have no graphics card, meaning that you'd need to add a USB one in order to connect it to a monitor. I'd imagine that would add an extra 20-30 watts to the overalll consumption straight away.

My main home PC draws about 400 watts when running (I use it for video editing, and so it has a fast processor, 4gb of memory, five hard drives and three optical drives in it). Often when I get home in the evening I put the thing on, do an email check and then go away and do the ironing, have supper or whatever while leaving it running; and then spend about another 30 minutes or so in it before bedtime. I'm conscious that this isn't the most energy efficient usage pattern in the world, but £300 is a lot to pay for something that would probably only save me £30-40 a year on electricity.

However, if something like this gizmo were available for around £100 and included a built-in graphics card (even a basic one), then for low-intensity use where the power and storage space of my main PC wasn't needed I'd be very tempted.

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It looks a sorely tempting piece of kit from a power consumption standpoint, but from the specs it appears to have no graphics card, meaning that you'd need to add a USB one in order to connect it to a monitor. I'd imagine that would add an extra 20-30 watts to the overalll consumption straight away.

My main home PC draws about 400 watts when running (I use it for video editing, and so it has a fast processor, 4gb of memory, five hard drives and three optical drives in it). Often when I get home in the evening I put the thing on, do an email check and then go away and do the ironing, have supper or whatever while leaving it running; and then spend about another 30 minutes or so in it before bedtime. I'm conscious that this isn't the most energy efficient usage pattern in the world, but £300 is a lot to pay for something that would probably only save me £30-40 a year on electricity.

However, if something like this gizmo were available for around £100 and included a built-in graphics card (even a basic one), then for low-intensity use where the power and storage space of my main PC wasn't needed I'd be very tempted.

These are the graphic specs

* Intel GMA500 graphics acceleration

* Full hardware video acceleration of H.264, MPEG2, VC1, and WMV9

* DVI Digital output up to 1920 x 1080 through HDMI connector

So seems more than acceptable to me.

Looks good but has similar specs (processor and ram) to the Acer Aspire One I'm using, performance is acceptable for a very small PC but it does struggle with on-line streamed video at times. You can accept that for the portability but not sure I'd be happy with it on my main PC.

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Back in the 1970s my grandmother had a two-way intercom system with her neighbour that sent the signal through mains electricity cables rather than wirelessly.

It looks a sorely tempting piece of kit from a power consumption standpoint, but from the specs it appears to have no graphics card, meaning that you'd need to add a USB one in order to connect it to a monitor. I'd imagine that would add an extra 20-30 watts to the overalll consumption straight away.

My main home PC draws about 400 watts when running (I use it for video editing, and so it has a fast processor, 4gb of memory, five hard drives and three optical drives in it). Often when I get home in the evening I put the thing on, do an email check and then go away and do the ironing, have supper or whatever while leaving it running; and then spend about another 30 minutes or so in it before bedtime. I'm conscious that this isn't the most energy efficient usage pattern in the world, but £300 is a lot to pay for something that would probably only save me £30-40 a year on electricity.

However, if something like this gizmo were available for around £100 and included a built-in graphics card (even a basic one), then for low-intensity use where the power and storage space of my main PC wasn't needed I'd be very tempted.

Channel Five recently reviewed a bunch of "Net Top's."

http://fwd.five.tv/gadget-show/videos/jon-...on-test-nettops

One was able to play HDTV full screen, at acceptable quality. Can't remember which one.

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I've just ordered a pair of the Ethernet over Power adapters - £40 on Amazon, And a pair of Plug PCs £120.

What we really need is to have the EoP combined with the plug PCs. But for now I am going link the PCs using the PoE adapters and a spare NetGear Hub to give me an extra port to make a terminal connection through.

I'll then look into what I/O functions I can achieve via the USB port - web cam would be a obvious start.

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These are the graphic specs

* Intel GMA500 graphics acceleration

* Full hardware video acceleration of H.264, MPEG2, VC1, and WMV9

* DVI Digital output up to 1920 x 1080 through HDMI connector

So seems more than acceptable to me.

Looks good but has similar specs (processor and ram) to the Acer Aspire One I'm using, performance is acceptable for a very small PC but it does struggle with on-line streamed video at times. You can accept that for the portability but not sure I'd be happy with it on my main PC.

Another ACER Aspire One user. I have two, and have bough several as presents - they are selling like hot cakes.

The Intel Atom is a really good CPU - good performance for such a tiny power envelope.

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