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Union Strike Threat At Major Energy Sites

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Britain faces a new threat of fuel shortages and power cuts as workers at some of the country's biggest oil refineries and power stations prepare to strike.

Shutdowns could come after union members voted over whether to stage official action over the hiring of cheaper foreign labour.

The result of a ballot of GMB union members was revealed to employers earlier this week, including energy groups BP and Shell.

Sky News understands that the vast majority of the 7,000 GMB union members at seven locations across the country have voted in favour of industrial action.

The ballot follows months of wildcat strikes sparked by the use of foreign workers at the Lindsey oil refinery in Lincolnshire.

Fellow union Unite, which represents the remainder of the 30,000-strong workforce, has also been balloting its members.

The results are to be announced next week, but Sky News has been told that they will show overwhelming member support for strike action.

Union officials are due to meet with employers later but it is understood that workers' leaders are determined to take action to force companies to stick to national collective pay deals.

The unions are also pushing for a pay rise, a national register of workers' skills and an agreement to allow union representatives to bring up grievances on sites.

It is likely the two unions will co-ordinate any decision over walkouts.

The seven sites at risk are BP's Forties pipeline facility at Grangemouth, the Ineos refinery at Grangemouth, Sellafield, Shell's refinery at Stanlow, RWE's power plants at Staythorpe in Nottinghamshire and Aberthaw in South Glamorgan and Chevron's refinery in Pembroke.

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/Business/...115374810?f=rss

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I cannot see too many in the private sector having any sympathy for those in the Trade Unions and/or the Public Sector.

Whether this is right or wrong for the workscape of the UK in the long term people are pretty pissed in the private sector at cushty pensions, increased pay deals (for eg the fuel tanker drivers last year) and in this case threatening power.

Might have worked in previous years but in the face a recession will their be a backlash against strikes etc – especially if the public sector get arsey about the needed cuts sure to be imposed by the Conservatives?

Two tribes go to war

Edited by Brave New World

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Well if the power goes off then computer will be saying no all round the UK.

This is when all those Disaster Recovery planners will find out that the back up generators in the the Data Centres are essentially useless if all the end user devices such as PCs, ATMs. Tills etc plus all the intervening routers have no power.

The effect would be faster and much morer devastating than in the 1970s when so much of the world was literally hand cranked.

Better get the tinned food in now.

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I cannot see too many in the private sector having any sympathy for those in the Trade Unions and/or the Public Sector.

Whether this is right or wrong for the workscape of the UK in the long term people are pretty pissed in the private sector at cushty pensions, increased pay deals (for eg the fuel tanker drivers last year) and in this case threatening power.

Might have worked in previous years but in the face a recession will their be a backlash against strikes etc – especially if the public sector get arsey about the needed cuts sure to be imposed by the Conservatives?

Two tribes go to war

How the f*ck do manage to involve the public sector into this story.

None of the workers mentioned are employed by the state and have not been so since the 1980s.

Nor are Trade Unions public sector bodies. They are mutual organisations, paid for and run by their members.

In fact many have their origins in the 19th Century.

The only two tribes going to war here are Capital and Labour and its pretty clear which side you are on.

Socialism for the rich (bailouts for banks etc) and capitalism for the poor.

Edited by up2nogood

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Guest absolutezero
I cannot see too many in the private sector having any sympathy for those in the Trade Unions and/or the Public Sector.

Whether this is right or wrong for the workscape of the UK in the long term people are pretty pissed in the private sector at cushty pensions, increased pay deals (for eg the fuel tanker drivers last year) and in this case threatening power.

Might have worked in previous years but in the face a recession will their be a backlash against strikes etc – especially if the public sector get arsey about the needed cuts sure to be imposed by the Conservatives?

Two tribes go to war

Or alternatively the non-unionised people could grow some balls, realise their bosses are not nice, philanthropic people and join a union themselves instead of being shafted up the **** all the time.

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Or alternatively the non-unionised people could grow some balls, realise their bosses are not nice, philanthropic people and join a union themselves instead of being shafted up the **** all the time.

Indeed. As the economy gets smaller, and resources get tighter, I expect union membership to rise significantly.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable
Excellent news. It'll do wonders for global warming.

Kentish wine has gone downhill since the 1600s.

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Whilst I generally hate unions they have a point. At the rate we are going we will have a country with the indigenous population on the dole and foreign labour shipping all the money abroad. How do we pay for everything then e.g. police, hospitals etc. or does it become every man for themselves?

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Whilst I generally hate unions they have a point. At the rate we are going we will have a country with the indigenous population on the dole and foreign labour shipping all the money abroad. How do we pay for everything then e.g. police, hospitals etc. or does it become every man for themselves?

I think you are a few years behind some others.

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Guest absolutezero
Indeed. As the economy gets smaller, and resources get tighter, I expect union membership to rise significantly.

I expect so too.

People will get fed up of having the piss taken out of them and look for backup. Strength in numbers and all.

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I expect so too.

People will get fed up of having the piss taken out of them and look for backup. Strength in numbers and all.

Like dogs fighting over the scraps?

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I expect so too.

People will get fed up of having the piss taken out of them and look for backup. Strength in numbers and all.

I was always brought up to be anti union. (My dad was a policeman dealing with striking miners)

But now having worked a number of years, I can see how employers really do take the piss and are not to be trusted. So yes Id join a union if there was ever the opportunity.

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Or alternatively the non-unionised people could grow some balls, realise their bosses are not nice, philanthropic people and join a union themselves instead of being shafted up the **** all the time.

Yes, they should fight tooth and nail for a higher wage, threaten their employer with bankruptcy, so they can dutifully increase their contributions to your pension.

The easiest way to raise net wages would be to reduce taxes.

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Guest absolutezero
Yes, they should fight tooth and nail for a higher wage, threaten their employer with bankruptcy, so they can dutifully increase their contributions to your pension.

The easiest way to raise net wages would be to reduce taxes.

Oh look. Here he is. :rolleyes:

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Sweet motha. It was a point of discussion. What was all that bleating yesterday about lack of debate yesterday and posts descedinging into slanging matches?!

“Whether this is right or wrong for the workscape of the UK in the long termâ€

Never mind hay – suppose it just shows how nervous certain section of the public sector and Unionised industries are.

For my own point is now an appropriate time to be demanding a pay rise in light of record unemployment and pay freezes and in some cases pay cuts.

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Well we need some practice for bigger power cuts later, on account of not building enough new nuc's or wind farms.

Would the 3G network fail during the blackouts? I could sit in the car with a laptop and dongle but I don't know if 3G masts have back up generators.

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Guest absolutezero
Sweet motha. It was a point of discussion. What was all that bleating yesterday about lack of debate yesterday and posts descedinging into slanging matches?!

“Whether this is right or wrong for the workscape of the UK in the long termâ€

Never mind hay – suppose it just shows how nervous certain section of the public sector and Unionised industries are.

For my own point is now an appropriate time to be demanding a pay rise in light of record unemployment and pay freezes and in some cases pay cuts.

Make of Stars what you will but I find him to be a bit of a ass.

I'll deal with his points below.

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Guest absolutezero
Yes, they should fight tooth and nail for a higher wage, threaten their employer with bankruptcy, so they can dutifully increase their contributions to your pension.

The easiest way to raise net wages would be to reduce taxes.

Who mentioned pensions? Oh. You did. You seem to be obsessed with it.

1. If an employer won't pay decent wages (at the going rate or better to retain staff) they don't deserve to be in business and deserve to go bankrupt. The private sector is the epitome of business practice after all. :rolleyes: If you can't cut the mustard you go under.

2. If you think trade unions are only about higher pay, you are hideously mistaken.

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Who mentioned pensions? Oh. You did. You seem to be obsessed with it.

1. If an employer won't pay decent wages (at the going rate or better to retain staff) they don't deserve to be in business and deserve to go bankrupt. The private sector is the epitome of business practice after all. :rolleyes: If you can't cut the mustard you go under.

The government introduces extra costs to being productive. It isn't a matter of 'deserving' or being worthy, a business is in in business if it is in business and the extra costs that you inflict, make it less likely that it will be.

2. If you think trade unions are only about higher pay, you are hideously mistaken.

I never said they were

The best way to improve the lives of workers is to reduce or eliminate the fines placed on them for working.

Edited by Stars

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Guest absolutezero
The government introduces extra costs to being productive. It isn't a matter of 'deserving' or being worthy, a business is in in business if it is in business and the extra costs that you inflict, make it less likely that it will be.

Such as decent wages and decent working conditions perhaps?

I never said they were

The best way to improve the lives of workers is to reduce or eliminate the fines placed on them for working.

Or pay them more wages?

Best from whose point of view? The workers or the greedy fatcat bosses?

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With what the banksters have got away with I find it difficult to criticise any person or group using their leverage to blackmail the population/employer/supplier of funds.

Precedent has been set on a scale, type and for a less deserving group than has ever been done before. There are going to be serious moral, social and financial ramifications for decades for what the banksters have done and everything else is pretty insignificant. If these crooks can get away with it why not everyone else?

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With what the banksters have got away with I find it difficult to criticise any person or group using their leverage to blackmail the population/employer/supplier of funds.

Precedent has been set on a scale, type and for a less deserving group than has ever been done before. There are going to be serious moral, social and financial ramifications for decades for what the banksters have done and everything else is pretty insignificant. If these crooks can get away with it why not everyone else?

FFS, stop waffling on about 'bankstas'. We can see elsewhere the real 'bankstas' were those on £15k p.a. who fiddled applications.

The government has got us into this mess and the sooner it goes the better.

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